100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

May 30, 1940 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1940-05-30

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MHtft CAN DAILY

NTI ~ ~w N 0'.-i

rT

Stud
Tu
The
Scienc
Degree
oral A
by As
burne.
The
cent T
The si
mentc
time o
half of
presen
a com.
metho
ferent
social]
pology
appoin
Prof
anin

nait oCult ctence femtnars
In Degree Pro gram Announced
(y Topics Ani Faculty al applications have been received
Nam d-Sumand provision may be made to ac-
ors Nases; Summer cept several more students for the
madln Courses Givenj Degree Program at the beginning of
next semester.
final seminars in the Social Other seminars for juniors which
es for juniors and seniors in the have already been announced are
e Program for Honors in Lib- "The Development of Social and Po-
krts was announced yesterday litical Institutions," tutored by Prof.
sistant Dean Lloyd S. Wood- Howard B. Calderwood; "The Devel-:
opment of the Scientific Attitude,"
Junior Seminar is titled "Re- tutored by Prof. B. D. Thuma; and
trends in the Social Sciences." a seminar in "Literature" led by Dr.
tudents will trace the develop- Otto Graf.
of the social sciences from the Senior Seminars include, . "Litera-
f Herbert Spencer in the latter ture in An Age of Intellectual Crisis,"
f the nineteenth century to the led by Dr. John Arthos; "The Emer-
t. The group will undertake gence of Modern Concepts of the
parative study on the concepts, Nature of NVuatter," conducted by
ds and objectives which dif- Prof. Byron A. Soule; and "The Place
date sociology in general from of the State in Economic Life," tu-
psychology and social anthro- tored by Prof. E. C. Simmons.
ted tutor for this seminar.
*. Prof. Mischa Titiev has been LI-lft ap-
. Richard C. Fuller has been jt)
)L d fitn nt C ho Z-itQv

Allies Prepare For Vast Coitter-A ttack
ENGLAND ZEEBRUG NETHERLANDS
-OOSTEND* // eANTWERP
UVER *BRUj '!/ /
D JNKERQUE BRUG GHENT (r
CALAIS DUNKIRK ///
YPR ES /Lj/ *A/ N / MAASTRICHT
COUTRA BRUSSELS
BOULOGNE4 CURTRAIM R
HAZEBROUCK LILLE.* TR NLIEGE
LA BASSEE , 1" 5 NAMUR Z
BERCK e rBE VOf ti'///
DIEP E 5aA PE Ote P.1
ARRASDOUAI
ABBEVILLE 1I G/ IVE
CAMBRAI+e
PERONN
DIEPPE AMIEN$" ST QUENTIN ST MICHEL
.LA FERE /7/
LAON p
ROUEN OETHEL 0 A ONGW
""i p
' , OI SSONS !
REIMS 2 o
. e ~PARIS MLE
All the fury of Allied arms was reported being primed for what may be the beginning of the decisive
battle of the war. This Associated Press map indicates positions after the capitulation of the Belgians.
1. The narrow pocket where the British forces are trapped. The troops redoubled efforts to fight south-
ward to the Somme. Channel ports of Ostend and Dunkerque were apparently still open for flight. 2. French
armies renewed pressure on the Somme front in a fight to relieve pressure on the armies in the pocket.
3. The full might of the Allied forces, estimated at nearly 650,000 men, was believed ready to smash at the
Nazis along the Aisne River to force withdrawal of Germans from the north. Shaded area indicates terri-
tory now under German control. The gap separating the Allies in the Peronne-Arras sector apparently has
been widened to almost 35 miles. The broken line ar ound the shaded area is the approximate battle line.

I

Jappmnuea umor o fme enUorb emi-
nar which is titled "Labor." The
group will undertake a detailed study
of the origin and development of
the labor movement, the emergence
of labor organizations, and some of
the attendant social legislation.
All groups will be given supplemen-
tary reading to do during the sum-
mer in preparation for their semin-
ars next fall. A number of addition-

Student Loan
ILibrary Aids

I

DAILY OFFICIAL
BULLETIN

(Continued from Page 4)
of Fluids." Friday, May 31, 2:00
p.m., 3301 E. Eng. Chairman, G. G.
Brown.
Lectures
The Hopwood Lecture will be given
by Henry Seidel Canby this after-
noon, May 31, at 4:15 p.m. The title,
"The American Tradition, and Con-
temporary Literature." Announce-
ment of the Hopwood prizes will be
made immediately following the lec-
ture. The meeting is open to the
public.
R. W. Cowden
Coming Events
Wesley Foundation: Tea and Open
House for students in the Assembly
Room of Wesley Hall from 3:30 to 5:30
p.m., Friday, May 31. Members of
all Guilds are cordially invited.

Gives Analysis
Journalist Features Article
On Housiig Problems.
A complete page analysis of Amer-
ica's housing problem-opinion and
analysis--is featured in today's edi-
tion of the Michigan Journalist, lab-
oratory newspaper of the department
of journalism.
Outstanding are articles on Pon-
tiac's Oakland Housing Corporation,
which, according to the interview with
its manager and architect, "have
greatly increased the possibility of
success of housing projects organ-
ized under private corporations," on
public housing in Detroit and the
United States Housing Act.
Also featured are interviews with
Prof. Benjamin W. Wheeler, of the
history department, on the gloomy
future for democracy in Europe, with
Prof. Roy W. Sellars, of the philoso-
phy department and with Prof. Arth-
ur W. Bromage, of the political sci-
ence department.
The paper was published for the
Department of Journalism by the
Pontiac Daily Press, Pontiac.
Elects New Members,
Iota Alpha, graduate engineering
fraternity, elected new officers and
committee members at a banquet giv-
en last week. Robert F. Thomson
was chosen president, R. C. Porter,
vice-president, and T. G. Hanson, re-
cording secretary.

500_Annually
More than 500 financially poor
students are aided each semester by
loans of text books from the Student
Loan Library of the University.
The Library was begun in 1937
with the aid of faculty members and
gifts from interested alumni. In
the two and one-half years that it
has been in existence more than $2,000
has been given to it for the purchase
of new books.
But the demand, according to Dean
Erich Walter of the College of Liter-
ature, is far in excess of the supply
of books which the Library owns.
Most of the Library's reserve fund,
Dean Walter explained, is in endow-
ments, the income of which is used
to replenish the stock of texts. The
income, he said, is not great enough
to pay for all those books which ar
needed.
Students on campus frequently
find themselves at the end of the
semester with books which they are
neither able to sell because of their
condition or which are no longer
used at the Uniyersity. In either
case, Dean Walter urged, the Loan
Library is eager to accept such books.
Books for the Loan Library may be
left at the charge desk of any library
branch on campus, Dean Walter said.
They are repaired, rebound if neces-
sary, and turned in to the Loan Li-
brary in the Angell Hall Study Hall.
Here they are made available to
needy students.
Books are loaned to students only
after a recommendation has been
received from a dean, professor, or
student counsellor. If it is decided
that a book may be loaned to a stu-
dent, he is given a slip which he may
present at the Angell Hall Study Hall
for his book.
PARTY
PICTURES
for the whole year
STILL AVAILABLE
Place your order NOW for
those pictures you forgot
during the year.
"Bob"'Gach
14 Nickels Arcade

Mack Praises
Tutorial Work
For Congress
Scih(lastie Assistance Is
Given By Thirty-Eight
Student Study-Helpers
With the close of the Congress tu-
torial system for this semester, Rob-
ert Mack, '42, chairman of the schol-
arship committee, expressed thanks
of Congress publicly to those stu-
dents who offered their services as
tutors.
The tutors are John Allen. '42, Fred
Arnold, '42A, Ray Barnes, '40E, Hen-
ry Barringer, '42. Merrill Batchelder,
'42P, Arthur Biggens, '42, Innes Bou-
ton, '40E. Erwin Bowers, '41, Claude
Broders, '40E, Richard Briggs, '43,
Donald Carson. '40E, Arthur Carter,
'42E, Frank Conway, '40E, Klaus Deh-
linger, '42, Robert Deland, '40E, Frank
Feely, '40E, Charles Forbes, '40E.
Other tutors are Yale Forman, '42,
Harold Goeller, '42E, Richard Gros,
'40E, Benjamin Kamberg. '41E, Rob-
ert Kieber, '42Spec., Martin Kiehle,
'40E, Russel LaFrance, '42, Daniel
Levine, '42, Henry Levinstein, '42,2
Albert Ludy, '42, Robert Mack, '42,
William Mallick, '42, Philip Mandel,
'42E, William Newton, '41, Fred Os-
berg, '40E.
The list continues with Robert
Phillips, '42, Fred Shands, '40E, Rich-
ard Shuey, '42E, Robert Slepian, '42E,
Douglas Tracy, '40E and Chester
Weger, '42E.

Expect Cornered Foes'

apitulation

(Continued tron Page 1)

Germans engulfed the Belgian chan-
nel port of Ostend, passed Bruges
and reached Dixmude; occupied
Langemarck; raised the swastika over
Armentieres, near Lille; broke up a
fortified French border position near
Cassel through a rearguard attack,
and stormed Ypres anid Kemmel, of
tragic World War memory.
Street fighting was reported in
Dunkerque (presumably between the
Allies and advanced Nazi armored
columns).
Dunkerque, the Germans say, has
been burning for three days. It re-
mainsbtheonly port where it is bare-
ly possible to embark British forces.
German speedboats infest the
Channel waters while the dive-bomb-

ing Stukas plummet down to pick "throw bombs aimlessly" over wes-
off British ships seeking the coast. tern Germany.
Moreover, the Germans are report- Precise lists are being compiled of
ed in dispatches from the front to every death and wound from these
be raining shells into the British from r raids, it was stated, and DNB, the
Lille to the sea. official news agency, added, "Eng-
It is admitted, however, that the land had better watch herself."
British are fighting back desperately
at several points.
Germany's press has been taking To Appeas Soviet
such a bitter turn toward France LONDON, May 29. -(A')-- Win-
in recent days, especially as regards ston Churchill, Britain's new prime
the alleged "torture" of German prisminister, was reported tonight to be
oners, that it is guessed widely that mnsewsrpre oih ob
the end of fighting on the northern seeking to "appease" Soviet Russia
front will be followed by a giant drive by naming Sir Stafford Cripps, left
on Paris. wing British laborite, as ambassador
This would take the place of the to Moscow.
long-expected assault on the British Informed quarters said Sir Staf-
Isles, for the time being. fod, already on his way to Moscow
To push on Paris, the Germans as a "special envoy" to conclude long-
must break the new French line on delayed trade negotiations with the
the Somme and Aisne Rivers, less Soviet, probably would be given full
than 100 miles north of the capital. ambassadorial rank in order to meet
However, German reports say the a condition of the Soviet for better
British' air force is continuing tof relations.

I
t
J

HANDY SERVICE DIRECTORY

LLL

Handy Service
Advertising
Rates
Cash Rates
12c per reading line for one or
two insertions.
1cu per reading line for three
or more insertions.
Charge Rates
15e per reading line for one or
two insertions.
13c per reading line for three
or more insertions.
Five average words to a reading
line. Minimum of three lines per
insertion.
CONTRACT RATES ON REQUES'r
Our Want-Advisor will be de-
lighted to assist you in composing
your ad. Dial 23-24-1 or stop at
the Michigan Daily Business Office,
420 Maynard Street.
TRANSPORTATION -21
WANTED: Passenger to California,
first week in June. Ralph Phillips,
1302 N. University, Phone 2-1626.
4911
WANTED: Passenger to help with
driving to Great Falls, Montana,
or points enroute; ,leaving June
12th. Edith L. Hoyle, Teacher,
University High School. Phone
9570, Sat. and Sun. evenings. 467
GOOD TH INGS TO EAT - 16
THE LANTERN SHOP, 1107 Willard,
will serve their regular hours
Memorial Day. 488
EXCELLENT " MEALS -- Monday
through Saturday during Summer
Session for $5.00 per week at Tri-
angle Fraternity House, 927 For-
est. Call 8974. 487
ARTICLES FOR SALE
FOR SALE: Buick coupe, $50.00.
Drive it home-sell for more. 310
No. Thayer.
FOR RENT
FOR SUMMER: 3-room furnished
apartment for two or three per-
sons. 515 Church. Phone 4373. 447

FURNISH.9 APARTMENT: Four
rooms; two bedrooms; three or
four people; three-room apart-
ments. 341 E. Liberty. 481
ATTRACTIVE suburban apartments,
convenient to University. Unfur-
nished six I rooms, $35.50; five
rooms, $35.50; seven rooms, $40.50;
stove, refrigerator, electric water
heater, use of laundry, garage.
Other apartments :furnished and
unfurnished. Oril Ferguson, 928
Forest. Phone 2-2839. 480
- MOVING -
STEVENS
INTERSTATE MOVING
We Deliver In Anmy Direction
Our Own Vans
410 N. Thayer St. Phone 2-3802
ELSIFOR MOVING
& STORAGE CO.
Local and Long Distance Moving
Storage - Packing - Shipping
Every Load Insured
310 W. Ann Phone 4297
MISCELLANEOUS-20
WASHED SAND AND GRAVEL -
Driveway gravel, washed pebbles.
Killins Gravel Company. Phone
7112. 13
WISE Real Estate Dealers: Run list-
ings of your vacant houses in Thej
Daily for summer visiting profes
sors. Dial 23-24-1 for special
rates.
STRAYED, LOST, FOUND-1
LOST--A Retina Miniature Cam-
era-reward-call 2-4409 485

SITUATIONS WANTED -2
BY MAN AND WIFE as porter and
cook in Fraternity. First class lo-
cal reference. Phone 6764. 472
EXPERIENCED COOK: White wo-
man; A-1 references; keeps within
budget; wants connection with
fraternity or sorority. Box 222.
489
LAUNDERING--9
LAUNDRY -- 2-1044. Sox darned.
Careful work at low prices. 16
WANTED-TO BUY-4
BEN THE TAILOR-More money for
your clothes. Open evenings.
122 E. Washington. 329
HIGHEST CASH PRICES paid for
your discarded wearing apparel.
Claude Brown, 512 S. Main Street.
146
ANY OLD CLOTHiNG--PAY $5.00
DIAMONDS, TYPEWRITERS. &
FURS, MINKS, PERSIAN LAMBS,
TO $500. SUITS, OVERCOATS,
CASH FOR OLD GOLD. PHONE
SAM--6304. SUNDAY APPOINT-
MENTS PREFERRED. 359
TYPING - 18
TYPING-L. M. Heywood, 414 May-
nard St., Phone 5689. 374
TYPING-Experienced. Miss Allen,
408 S. Fifth Ave. Phone 2-2935 or
2-1416. 34
VIOLA STEIN-Experienced typist
and notary public-excellent work.
706 Oakland, phone 6327. 20
---- - - --------

f

F
Y~
(

LOW RAILROAD FARES
New Reclining Seat Coaches from Toledo
ONE-WAY COACH FARES FROM ANN ARBOR
NEW YORK $15.00
Pittsburgh . . $6.40 Washington $12.40
(oungstown ..5.10 Philadelphia . 13.05
olumbus .... 4.10 Akron .. ..4.55
Baltimore.. .12.40 Harrisburg ..1 1.30
(Via Ann Arbor Railroad Toledo, thence Pennsylvania Railroad)
PROPORTIONATE LOW FARES TO ALL DESTINATIONS
iLeave Ann Arbor 3:25 P.M.

DOUBLE ROOM for summer

and I

I

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan