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May 14, 1940 - Image 6

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1940-05-14

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY
eo

tESnAY, MAY 14, 1940

Fisher To Give
First Address
At Conferencei
National Extention GroupI
Starts Annual Four-Day
Parley HereThursday
Convening Thursday through Sat-
urday, the National University Ex-
tension Association will conduct its!
25th annual four-day conference on
the theme "Objectives of University
Extension in the Next Quarter Cen-
tury." Fifty-two members of the
Association will be represented.
Director Emeritus Leon J. Rich-
ardson of the University of California
will preside over the opening session
at 2 p.m. in the Rackham Building at
which Dr. Charles A. Fisher, director
of University Extension Service, will
give ' a welcoming address. At 2:30
p.m., after a response by Prof. Louis
E. Reber, formerly of the University
of Wisconsin, a past president's panel I
forum will be conducted by Prof. H.E
G. Ingham of the University of Kan-
sas. The subjects to be treated in
the forum will be the contributions
of various colleges, the development
of visual instruction, and the philoso-
phy and objectives of university ex-
tension.
Celebration of the Association's
silver anniversary will be held at a
banquet at 7 p.m. In the Union Ball-
room. With Prof. B. C. Riley of the
University of Florida presiding, the
banquet will hear remarks by Presi-
dent Alexander G. Ruthven and Prof.
Emeritus W. D. Henderson of the Uni-
versity.
Activities Thursday and Friday will
include general sessions on the broad-
functions of extension work and group
meetings on the sundry educational
techniques. Luncheons, picnics, and
breakfast round tables will be special
features.
Perspective's Correction
The design on page 4 of Sunday's
issue of Perspectives was erroneous-
ly credited to Howard Whalen. Bar-
bara L. Carritte, '43A, was the artist.

t
'

Health Service Discovers Three
Students Strilken By Trichinosis
Dread i esie Contlracted the mouth as the larvai cysts of The
iFrolm Poor-ly (Cookeel trichina imbedded inhWe meat are
Por, Dr.taken in with the food. From the
Pork, Dr. Gates Says cysts tiny worms develop in the in-
Infections of trichinosis, a formid- testinal tract, are carried by the blood
able parasitic disease, have been dis- stream until they come to rest be-
coveed arstdiseastthaeestuentis-tween the tissues of the arm and leg
covered in at least three students muscles. Here they multiply and
within recent weeks, Dr. Lloyd Gates produce serious effects similar to
of the Department of Hygiene and pouesrosefcssmlrt
I thelicHeattmevealedHyeedan severe attacks of rheumatism, Dr.
Public Health revealed yesterday. Gates said. Cases which are allowed
Though those cases which have to advance, he added, may result in
been discovered are not likely to be death.
fatal, he said, the persons will be Dr. Gates emphasized the fact
interned for more than four months that students should be wary of
of intensive treatment. eating half-raw pork in any form.
Probable source of the infection Because three per cent of all pork is
was given as improperly cooked pork normally infected, he pointed out,
served in hamburgers or pork steaks, one can never be certain that the
Because microscopic inspection meat which he is eating, regardless

Final Examination Schedule
zecond emeaer, 1939-40
College of Liteauaire, Ecience, a Od the Arrs

Time
Wed.,
Mon.,
Tues.,
Mon.,
Mon.,
Sat.,
Thurs.
Mon.,
Tues.,
Thurs.
Fri.,
Tues.,
Fri.,
Sat.,

REGULAR
of ExAtmioation
June 5, 9-12
June. 3, 2- 5
June 4, 9-12
June 3, 9-12
June 10, 9-12
June 1, 9-12
June, 6, 9-12

.,

June
June
June
June
June
June
June

Legal Review
To Be Issued

10, 2- 5
4, 2- 5
6, 2- a
7, 2- 5
11, 9-12
7, 9-12
8, 2- 5
SPECIAL

EXAMINATIONS
rime of Exercise
Mon. at 8
Mon. at 9
Mon. at 10
Mon. at 11
Mon, at I
Mon, at 2
Mon. at 3
Tues. at 8
T'ues at 9
Tues. at 10
Tues. at 11.
Tues. at 1
Tues. at 2
Tues. at 3
EXAMINATIONS
Special Period
No. Time of Examination
1. Wed., June 5, 2- 5
IT. Sat, June 8, 9-12
II]L Tues., June 11, 2- 5
IV. Sat., June 1, 2- 5

Iowa
(n

Professor Writes
Law Curriculum

alone will reveal the presence of tri-
china, Dr. Gates explained, those
restaurants which have been serving
the meat are not to be blamed entire-
ly for the infections. The negligence
of the student in accepting meat
which has not been thoroughly cooked
accounts for all the disease, he said.
Trichinosis is contracted through
. .r
EiohYlth Techni
Will Go On Sale
New Issue Will Feature
EngineeringProgress
Featuring stories by noted engin-
eers, professors and students, the
Michigan Technic will make its
eighth appearance of the year tomor-
row.
The leading article was written by
William B. Stout, president of the
Stout Engineering Laboratories in De-
troit on "Engineering Housing." In
it he warns the architect that he
may find his position threatened by
the "ever broadening field of engin-
eering."
J. H. Scaff, '29, has written an
article entitled "The Chemist in Com-
munication" which describesthe pro-
gress of the chemical engineer in
such fields as telephone, telegraph
and radio.

of its course, is
disease.

absolutely free of the

gpch 49ewla
Sound motion pictures in techni-
color describing some of the thrills
of automobile racing will be offered
to members of the Society of Auto-
motive Engineers and the American
Society of Mechanical Engineers in
a joint meeting at 7:30 p.m. today in'
the amphitheatre of the Rackham
Building.
A meeting of the Engineers' Coun-
cil will be held tomorrow to decide up-
on officers for the coming year. The
Council now consists of six members,
two additional members will be add-
ed next September. Members, of
the Council now are George P. Hogg,
'41E, Donald E. Hartwell, '41E, Rob-
ert G. W. Brown, '42E, Richard C.
Higgins, '42E, William W. Hutcher-
son, '43E, and Richard Gillion, '43E.
Newly elected officers of Triangles,
Junior Engineering College honor-
ary society, are Robert Sibley, '42E,
president; Robert Collins, '42E, sec-
retary; and Robert Wallace, '42E,
treasurer. They will replace Edward
King, '41E, Peter Brown, '41E, and
Charles Heinen, '41E.

Courses
French 1, 2, 12, 32, 71,
111, 112, 153.
Speech 31, 32.
Political Science 1, 2, 51, 52.
German 1, 2, 31, 32.
Spanish 1, 2, 31, 32.
Zoology 1, Botany 1,
Psychology 31.

IRREGULAR EXAMINATIONS
English 1 and 2 shall be examined on Saturday, June 1, 9-12.
Economics 51, 52 and 54 shall be examined on Saturday, June 8, 2-5.
Economics 122 shall be examined on Saturday, June 8, 9-12.
It shall be understood that classes entitled to the regular examination
periods shall have the right-of-way over the above-mentioned irreg-
ular examinations and that special examinations will be provided for
students affected by such conflicts by the courses utilizing the irreg-
ular examination periods.
And deviation from the above schedule may be made only by mutual
agreement between students and instructor and with the approval of
the Examination Schedule Committee.
Second Law Institute To Mee Here

The May issue of the Michigan
Law Review, official publication of
the Law School, will appear on or
before May 17, Prof. Paul G. Kauper,
editor, announced yesterday.
The Law Review contains the com-
mentaries of noted professors in spe-
cial fields on significant develop-
ments and also the contributions of
students in the Law School. The
publication is distributed outside of
the campus and enables practicing
lawyers to keep in contact with con-
temporary problems as well as giv-
ing law students the opportunity to
receive practical training.
The feature article of the May issue,
by Prof. Philip Mechem of the Uni-
versity of Iowa, is a dissenting opin-
ion on the proposed four-year law
curriculum.
Morgan 1 rges Men
To te Democratic
Si Cooperatives
"The advice to pioneers in our day
is not 'go west,' but 'go cooperative,
young man, go cooperative,' Kenneth
Morgan, Director of the Student Re-
ligious'Association, explained in an
open meeting on cooperatives yester-
day in the Union.
Cooperatives, Morgan maintained,
attempt to instill in students the
democratic way of living, "something
that can be learned but not taught."
Students' rooming and boarding facil-
ities tend to influence their attitude
toward life morethan anything else
on campus, Morgan stated, because
the student has so much contact with
them. Cooperatives, he continued,
pruvide the democratic way to live,
since co-ops are the only places on
campus where students of all races
and creeds live together, every man
has one vote in the management and
p'licy of the house and the majority
vote always decides.

University Press
Arnoances Piano
Cuide Hook I~i
A new guide-book for the student.
teacher and lover of the piano, by
the late Prof. Arthur Lockwood of
the School of Music, was recently
published by the University Press,
Dr. Frank E. Robbins, assistant to
the President and managing editor
of the Press, announced yesterday.
"Notes on the Literature of the
Piano" consists primarily of 61 sep-
arate sections, each devoted to the
piano works of a prominent coin-
poser. Criticisms and comments have
been appended to each of these lists,
written with the authority of a man
who spent more than 30 years as
an artist and teacher.
Another section of the volume in-
cludes the names and principal piano
works of 244 other composers, classi-
fied according to nationalities. Com-
ments on selected works are also in
this section.
At the end of the volume are lists
of compositions for piano and or-
chestra, for two pianos and for young
people, concert etudes and the his-
torical programs arranged by Anto
Rubinstein, as well as a reference
bibliography on piano music.
The author, a pupil of Leschetitz-
ky with Garbrilowitsch and Schna-
bel, was a concert pianist of great
distinction, Doctor Robbins said. Pro-
fessor Lockwood's knowledge of piano
literature, according to Doctor Rob-
bins, was very extensive, as was his
ability to pass on to others the bene-
fits of his personal experience.
Bunting Talks At Capitol
Dean Russel W. Bunting of the
School of Dentistry, is leaviAg to
attend the eighth American Scien-
tific Congress in Washington, D.C.,
where he will speak tomorrow morn-
ing

The Law Institute, held for the first
time last year by the Law School,f
will continue June 20 through 22 thisI
summer as an annual event.
Recent developments in three sep-
arate fields of law will be considered
at the three-day meeting in the class
rooms of the School, namely "Pro-
cedure: Discovery before Trial,"

Lecturers will include Professors
Edson R. Sunderland and John E.
Tracy of the Law School as well as a
practicing attorney. The subject of
"Restitution," which is growing as a
branch of equity jurisprudence, will
be discussed during the Institute by
Prof. John P. Dawson of the School.
All sessions of the Institute will be

I I

lip, ----- --- -----=, 1

r
it

i

H. W. CLARK
English Boot and Shoe Maker
Our shoe repair department--the
best in the city. Prices t are right.
SOUTH FOREST AVENUE

''

"Some Problems in the Introduction held in the morning and early after-
of Documentary Evidence" and "Dis- noon, and attendance is open to any
covery of Assets after Judgment." lawyer.

' I

''

HANDY SERVICE DIRECTORY

Handy Service
Advertising
Rates
Cash Rates
12e per reading line for one or
two insertions.
1Oc per reading line for three
or more insertions.
Charge Rates
15c per reading line for one or
two insertions.
13c per reading line for three
or more insertions.
Five average words to a reading
line. Minimum of three lines per
insertion.
CONTRACT RATES ON REQUEST
Our Want-Advisor will be de-
lighted to assist you in composing
your ad. Dial 23-24-1 or stop at
the Michigan Daily Business Office,
420 Maynard Street.

TYPING-18
TYPING-L. M. Heywood, 414 May-
nard St., Phone 5689. 374
TYPING-Experienced. Miss Allen,
408 S. Fifth Ave. Phone 2-2935 or
2-1416. 34
HELP WANTED
WANTED: College men for Summer
employment. Apply Room 304,
Michigan Union, between 1 and
5 p.m. Tuesday, May 14. 433
SUMMER Positions--In Northeast-
ern Michigan. Prefer men of farm
experience. Interview in Michigan
Union Wednesday, May 15. 430
FOR RENT
TO RENT for Summer-seven-room
furnished house. Available June
15. Call 2-3643. 428

GOOD FOOD
at Thrifty Prices

FOR RENT: Three-room furnished
apartment, walking distance to
Northwestern University-to be
sublet for summer or exchanged
for similar apartment in Ann Ar-
bor for Summer Session. Write
Edward F. Obert, Northwestern
Technological Institute, Evanston,
Illinois. 432
WANTED-TO RENT -6
APARTMENT WANTED for summer
school for three boys. Call Bob
Wagner, 2-2565.
WANTED TO RENT-House for 15
students, starting in September.
Write Box 12, Mich. Daily. 429
LAUNDERING -9
LAUNDRY -- 2-1044. Sox darned
Careful work at low prices. 16
MISCELLANEOUS- 20
CANARIES - Guaranteed singers.
Finches, bird cages, foods, pet sup-
Wies. Mrs. Ruffins, 562 South
Seventh, Phone 5330. 426
ARTICLES FOR SALE-3
FOR SALE-Northern Michigan ho-
tel in ideal location for club or ex-
clusive summer college. Write
Box 9, Michigan Daily. 431
FOR SALE-Ford 5-passenger con-
vertible; 1931; good condition;
$85.00. No trades. Phone 8675-
1402 Stadium. 425
- MOVING -
ELSIFOR MOVING
& STORAGE CO.
Local and Long Distance Moving
Storage - Packing -- Shipping
Every Load Insured
310 W. Ann Phone 4297
WANTED-TO BUY-4
BEN THE TAILOR-More money fo
your clothes. Open evenings
122 E. Washington. 32f
HIGHEST CASH PRICES paid foi
your discardedwearing apparel
Claude Brown, 512 S. Main Street
146
ANY OLD CLOTHING--PAY $5.OC
TO $500. SUITS, OVERCOATS
FURS, MINKS, PERSIAN LAMBS
DIAMONDS, TYPEWRITERS, &
CASH rOR OLD GOLD. PHONE
SAM-6304. SUNDAY APPOINT-
MENTS PREFERRED. 359
TRANSPORTATION -21
WISE Real Estate Dealers: Run list-
ings of your vacant houses in The
Daily for summer visiting profes-

4

TO]
PEANUT BUTTER
Puree c
Choice of Salad or Dessert

DAY'S SPECIALS
NOON

and JELLY SANDWICH
f Pea Soup
Choice of Beverage 26c
Assorted Rolls or Bread

BREADED VEAL CUTLET

(Choice of ONE)
Baked Beans Macaroni Au Gratin
Mashed Potatoes Puree of Yelow Pea Soup
Peas Shoestring Carorts Kidney Beans
Choice of Salad or Dessert Choice of Beverage 39c
NIGHT
SAVORY MEAT LOAF with ONION SAUCE
Assorted Rolls or Bread

"MOMMNEWI
=3I t

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f {ll
is"::: ':}}' :. Wt:'r:"::// x.
1}yX:1{ .
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rs

Aerimcan FriedI
Macaroni Au
Baked Beans
Choice of Salad or

(Choice of ONE)
Potatoes Mashed Potatoes Peas
Gratin Cream of Tomato Soup
Shoestring Carrots Kidney Beans
Dessert Choice of Beverage 39c

Smokers by the millions are making Chesterfield
the Busiest Cigarette in America. . .. It takes the right
combination of the world's best tobaccos to give you

ROAST LEG OF LAMB and MINT JELLY
A.,*A ~DedI.^r ,. onr

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