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May 12, 1940 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1940-05-12

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

PAGE ITWO

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

University Day
Set ForMay 18
Union Will Conduct Dance
And Tours On Campus
Approximately 150 high school
students from areas surrounding Ann
Arbor will be guests of the Union on
University Day, May 18, Carl, Rohr-
bach, '42, newly appointed member
of junior executive staff, announced
yesterday.
University Day is the traditional
get acquainted opportunity for many
prospective University students who
reside in the state. May 18 will be
the second such event held this se-
mester, the first having been held
on MVarch 30 attended by 150 high
school seniors.
Tours of the campus conducted
by staff members of the Union andI
consultations with the heads of dif-
ferent departments of the Univer-
Sity will feature the morning's ac-
tivity. This will be followed by a
luncheon at the Union.
Tentative plans for the afternoon
program include free games and a
radio dance, Rohrbach said.
University Day, according to Rohr-
bach, is valuable in that it gives pros-
pective students an insight into life
at the University.
LONDON, May 11. -(A")- Dutch
housewives took vengenace on cap-
tured German parachute troops un-
lucky to land in a suburban market
place. They beat them thoroughly
with knives, clubs and rolling pins,
a London Daily Express correspon-
dent reported.

Most Crucial Week-End Ruth Chatterton
Of Conflict Is Predicted Will Play Lead

Clavus Of Old Egyptian Tunic
Included In Elsburg Collection

I

By KIRKE L. SIMPSON
(Associated Press staff Writer)
Political developments in Britain
and France, of grim meaning for
Germany, usher in the most crucial
weekend of the eight-month-old Eu-
ropean war.
Challenged by Nazi invasion of
Lhe neutral low countries, Britain
swept Adolf Hitler's arch foe, Win-
ston Churchill, to supreme power as
prime minister of a coalition cab-
inet welded into unity by the crisis.
France matched that with a cabinet
shakeup of similar purport.
Hitler cannot fail to read in the
elevation of Churchill to the key
power post of the Allied war effort
a Franco-British resolution to fight
it out with him to the death.
The last faint hope in Germany
hat an "appeasement" mood in Eng-
land might afford a weak link in
Allied determination to crush Hit-
lerism died with Neville Chamber-
lain's surrender of his seals of of-
fice. There has never been an ap-
peasement thought in the head of
Britain's pudgy but powerful new
war leader as he contemplated Hit-
ler's rise.
In recasting their political ma-
chinery, France and Britain have
given German invaders of the low
countries a sterner answer than the
battle front itself in war-flooded
Holland and Belgium yet yields. At
a stroke, by that invasion, Hitler
accomplished for his foes what eight
months of political bickering in both
countries had failed to achieve-sol-
idarity on the home fronts.

I

The crisis has been met swiftly
by the western Allies by reorganiza-
tions on their slowest-moving and
weakest lines. With the war at their
own gates in full course, Britain and
France have resolved first of all to
submerge political bickering and get
on with the war with single-minded
intentness on victory, whatever the
cost.
It is of small import whether
Chamberlain was driven from office
or stepped out voluntarity. The re-
sult is the same and Britain's own
war helmsman, Churchill, is a life-
long apostle of aggressive and daring
action at the front.
Berlin misjudged the temper ofj
the low countries and their will and
readiness to resist as badly as it
misjudged Britain's reaction when
Poland felt the first crushing weight
of the Nazi war machine. That could
be a fatal error.
It seems certain that even before
the battle lines can stabilize on the
new front, the low countries must
be the unwilling victims of a raging
war of the air over their territory.
Germany must achieve air mastery
quickly to balk Allied help in force
that might leave her again stale-
mated on a water-guarded low coun-
try front.
Students will find copies of all
state absentee-voting laws on a re-
served shelf of the Bureau of Gov-
ernment Library, placed there by the
local chapter of the College Repub-
licans of America.

t

ii.1 . Y "IIIa oIIuI Part of a clavus from a linen tunic.
found in the Fayoum Province in
(Continued from Page 1) Egypt, shown in the accompanying
--- --- --_column is one of the pieces of the H.
tians, Madge Evans. Diana Barry- A. Elsberg collection of Coptic -and
more, John Emery, Hiram Sherman,Islamic Textiles now on exhibition in
Whitford Kane and Joseph Holld'nd.the galleries of the Rackham Build-
A highlight of the Season will be ing 2-5 daily till May 18.
the American premiere of St. John The design of the specimen, woven
Ervine's new play. "Boyd's Shop," of green and red wool and undyed'
-- linen thread, is that of roundeis con-
taining four heart-shaped leaves,
separated by paired quadrupeds.
The Eisberg collection was recent-
ly acquired by the Fine Arts Depart-
ment of the Uniersta. It is com-;
posed of 144 exampls one war-
ing fotund im Eg'. anmd , efuily as-
sembled over mny yea , bs the late
Mr. Elsberg of New York City, a
famous collector of arcint Near
Eastern, Euronen and Peruvian tex-
tles.
The textiles were selected to illus-
trate the history of the art of weav-C
ing found in Egypt from the third or
fourth c:nt ies A.. ' he collection
demcnstrates the evolution of weav-
ing from early Helleistic examples,
to later Coptic cloths, through the
transition period, and shows the grad-
ual change in taste afer the Arabi
conquest of Egypt in 641 A.D. to a
new style of decoration which became
popular under the Fatimid dynasty.
Two of the latter pieces are in-
LOUIS CALHERN scribed with the name of the Abba-
sid caliph al-Mogtadir and are dat-
which has been available for en- ed A.D. 917 and 925.
gagement because of Ervine's great Egypt has been recognized for more
interest in the drama festival. than a century as a most favorable

SUNDAY, MAY 12, 1941)
Churches Plan
For Mother's
Day Services
imel SSermons Special
Music Wil IPay Annual
Tribute To Mlotherhood
Mother's Day, annual tribute to
the nation's motherhood, and Pente-
cost, birthday of the Christian
Church, will be observed with special
sermons and music in the morning
worship services of local churches.
Honoring mothers of the First
Methodist Church congre':ation, mem
bers of Kappa Phi, Methodist soror-
ity will act as ushers, and Dr. Charles
W. Brashares will deliver his ser-
mon "Old and New", at the morning
services. Special solos will be given
by Miss Thelma Newell of the School
of Music.
Emphasizing the importance of the
family, Rev. C. H. Louckes will preach
on "The Christian Home." The Con-
gregation of the First Congregational
Church will hear Dr. Leonard A. Parr
speak on "Miniry of Beautiful" at
the special services at 10:45 a.m.
Worship service of the First Presby-
terian Church will feature vocal solos
and Dr. W. P. Lemon's sermon, "A
Day of Worth-Ship."
Celebration of the Pentecost com-
memorating the descent of the Holy
Spirit on the Apostles will feature
the Whitsunday services in the Cath-
olic, Lutheran, and Episcopal church-
es.

RARE TEXTILE

spot for the preservation of ancient
stuffs because of its advantageous
climatic conditions.

HANDY SERVICE DIRECTORYI

DAILY

OFFICIAL BULLETIN

SUNDAY, MAY 12, 1940

Handy Service
Advertising
Rates
Cash Rates
12c per reading line for one or
two insertions.
10c per reading line for three
or more insertions.
Charge Rates °
15c per reading line for one or
two insertions.
13c per reading line for three
or more insertions.
Five average words to a reading
line. Minimum of three lines per
insertion.
CONTRACT RATES QN REQUEST
Our Want-Advisor . will be de-
lighted to assist you in composing
your ad. Dial 23-24-1 or stop at
the Michigan Daily Business Office,
420 Maynard Street.
TYPING- 18
TYPING-L. M. Heywood, 414 May-
nard St., Phone 5689. 374
RADIO and
MICHIGAN Cabs

TYPING-Experienced. Miss Allen,
408 S. Fifth Ave. Phone 2-2935 or
2-1416. 34

STRAYED, LOST,
LOST Monday on
billfold; address
Please return and

FOUND - 1
Campus-black
528 Packard.
receive reward.
422

HELP WANTED
SUMMER Positions-In Northeast-
ern Michigan. Prefer men of farm
experience. Interview in Michigan
Union Wednesday, May 15. 430
FOR RENT
TO RENT for Summer-seven-room
furnished house. Available June
15. Call 2-3643. 428
WANTED-TO RENT-6
WANTED TO RENT-House for 15
students, starting in September.
Write Box 12, Mich. Daily. 429
STUDENT COUPLE desires to re-
serve furnished apartment for next
fall. Write c/o Box 7, The Mich-
igan Daily. 427
LAUNDERING-9
LAUNDRY - 2-1044. Sox darned.
Careful work at low prices. 16

MISCELLANEOUS-20
CANARIES - Guaranteed singers.
Finches, bird cages, foods, pet sup-
nlies. Mrs. Ruffins, 562 South
Seventh, Phone 5330. 426
ARTICLES FOR SALE-3
FOR SALE-Northern Michigan ho-
tel in ideal location for club or ex-
clusive summer cottage. Write
Box 9, Michigan Daily. 431
FOR SALE-Ford 5-passenger con-
vertible; 1931; good condition;
$85.00. No trades. Phone 8675-
1402 Stadium. 425
FOR SALE-Building sites-4 miles
out. $100 per acre-gorgeous view
-low taxes. Call owner evenings,
6196. 414
COUNTRY ESTATE-212 acres near
Ann Arbor. Colonial design, oil
heat, recreation room, 3-car ga-
rage, orchard. An excellent buy.
Ph. 2-1822, 2-1126. 423
- MOVING -
ELSIFOR MOVING
& STORAGE CO.
Local and Long Distance Moving
Storage - Packing - Shipping
Every Load Insured
310 W. Ann Phone 4297
WANTED-TO BUY-A
HIGHEST CASH PRICES paid for
your discarded wearing apparel.
Claude Brown, 512 S. Main Street..
146
ANY OLD CLOTHING-PAY $5.00
TO $500. SUITS, OVERCOATS,
FURS, MINKS, PERSIAN LAMBS,
DIAMONDS, TYPEWRITERS, &{
CASH FOR OLD GOLD. PHONE
SAM-6304. SUNDAY APPOINT-
MENTS PREFERRED. 3591
TRANSPORTATION -21
WISE Real Estate Dealers: Rim list-
ings of your vacant houses in The
Daily for summer visiting profes-
sors. Dial 23-24-1 for special
rates.
WASHED SAND AND GRAVEL -
Driveway gravel, washed pebbles.
Killins Gravel Company. Phonej
7112. 13

Phones
3030 or 7000

SEN IORS!
Phone Your
CAP and GOWN
ORDERS
at once
Moes Sprt S2os
6915 7296

IfII

featuring
Lovely Chinese Linens
EMBROIDERED and APPLIQUED
in pastel shades
Beautiful Mandarin Coats
GAY and COLORFUL
at the
Oriental Gift Shop
300-B South State Street

SUNDAY, MAY 12, 1940
VOL. L. No. 161
Notices
Student Tea: President and Mrs.
Ruthven will be at home to students
Wednesday afternoon, May 15, from
4 to 6 o'clock.
To the Members of the University
Senate: There will be a meeting of
the University Senate on Monday,
May 20, at 4:15 p.m. in the Rackham
Lecture Hall.
Louis A. Hopkins, Secretary
Faculty, College of Engineering:
There will be a meeting of the Facul-
ty of this College on Thursday, May
16, at 4:15 p.m., in Room 348,
West Engineering Building. Agenda:
Nomination of panel of three to re-
place Professor A. H. White on Ex-
ecutive Committee. Present mem-
bers:
A. H. White to June, 1940.
R. H. Sherlock to June, 1941.
E. L. Eriksen to June, 1942.
R. L. Morrison to June, 1943.
Nomination of member to replace
Professor B. F. Bailey on University
Council.BPresent members:
B. F. Bailey, term expires 1940.
A. Marin, term expires 1941.
E. M. Bragg, term expires 1942.
R. A. Dodge, term expires 1943.
Routine Business.
A. H. Lovell, Secretary.
To the Members of the University
Council: There will be a meeting
of the University Council on Mon-
day, May 13, at 4:15 p.m. in Room
1009 A.H.
AGENDA :
Approval of the Minutes.
Report of the Advisory Committee
to the University Extension Service,
C. A. Fisher.
Report of the Advisory Committee
to the Military Department, A. H.
Lovell.
Report of the Advisory Committee
to the Bureau of Appointments and
Occupational Information, G. E.
Myers.
Report of the Board in Control of
Student Publications, W. A. Mc-
Laughlin.
Report of the Committee on
Rhodes Scholarships, A. L. Cross.
Report of the Committee on the
Henry Russel Award, R. L. Miller.
Report of the Committee on Uni-
versity Lectures, L. M. Eich.
Subjects Offered by Members of
the Council.
Reports of the Standing Commit-
tees:
Program and Policy, E. B. Stason.
Educational Policies, . S. Duf-
fendack.
Student Relations, A. Marin.
Modern
MO& dW&%

Public Relations, S. W. Allen.
Plant and Equipment, C. S. Schoe-
pfle.
Louis A. Hopkins, Secretary
The University Bureau of Appoint-
ments and Occupational Information
has received notice of the following
Civil Service examinations. Last date
for filing application is noted in each
case:
UNITED STATES

Administrative Analyst,
$3,800, June 3.

tion, 201 Mason Hall. Office hours:
9-12 and 2-4.
German Departmental Library: All
books due not later than May 15.
Phi Beta Kappa: The keys for the,
(Continued on Page 4)
L.

salary

Today All Seats 35c
Today and Monday!

Associate Administrative Analyst,
salary $3,200, June 3.
Assistant Administrative Analyst,
salary $2,600, June 3.
Chief Administrative Analyst, sal-
ary $6,500, June 3.
Principal Administrative Analyst,
salary, $5,600, June 3.
Senior Administrative Analyst,
salary $4,600, June 3.
Student Dietitian, salary, $4,200
(less maint.), June 3.
Student Physiotherapy Aide, sal-
ary, $420 (less maint.), June 3.
MICHIGAN
Attendant Nurse B2, salary range
$90-110, May 25.
CITY OF DETROIT
Secretary and Chief Examiner, sal-
ary, $6,000, May 24.
Complete announcements on file
at the University Bureau of Appoint-
ments and Occupational Informa-

10

71.

i

E

xtra

0

"NITE CLUB WAS MARCH OF TIME
A STICK" NEWS OF THE DAY
COMING! "BUCK BENNY RIDES AGAIN"

Shows Today at 1-3-6-7-9 P.M.

F p pp
I "'1

.

1940 DR1MqTIC

SERSON

5 Weeks
Ruth Chatterton
in
o pre-Brocadway production of
"Prg//ww "
Mon. thru Sat.: Eves. at 8:30 - Mat.: Thurs. & Sat. at 3:15
TICKETS: 2.00 -$1.50-, $1.10 -75c

... COMING ... HORACE McNALLY

I

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