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February 21, 1940 - Image 2

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1940-02-21

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PAGE TWO-G

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

VMDNt SDA4, ",

WAQE TWO IVEIrnZSDAZ

Student Senate
Considers Plan
To Enact Skit
Robertson Will Present
Report; Annual Spring
Parley To Be Disussed
Breaking into a new field of en-
deavor, the Student Senate will con-
sider a plan for presenting a short
playlet intended to illustrate the com-
mon faults and possible remedies of
the job-seeking collegian, at its meet-
ing at 7:30 p.m. tomorrow, according
to Arnold White, '41, secretary. s
A report of the plan, the so-called
"It's Your Life". program, will be
made by President Paul Robertson,
'40E, speaking for the Ways and
Means Committee. In addition to
the regular committee reports, Sen-
ator Robert Reed, '42, of the Peace
and Parley Committee, will outline
plans and call for suggestions for the
annual Spring Parley. The Parley
last year was held in April, and so
far, no date has been set, although it
has been tentatively set for soon after
Spring Vacation.
Another new angle in the Senate
set-up, relating to its finances, will
be explained by Senator Martin
Dworkis, '40, of the Finance Commit-
tee, who announced that never before
in the Senate's history has there been
steadier. financial well-being, and at-
tributed this to "a new source of in-
come." Senator Dworkis would not
say what the source was.
Clover To Show Movies
At Spanish Meeting Today
Colored moving pictures of the
Colorado Canyon will be shown by
Dr. Elzada Clover, of the botany de-
partment, as a feature of the meeting
of La Sociedad Hispanica, at 8:15, p.m.
today in Room 304 of the Union.
The Spanish Club is also holding
final tryouts for its annual play,
"Zaragueta," at 3 p.m. Friday.
Students to try out for the seven
men's parts and four women's parts
are still needed, and anyone is eligible
even though he is not taking Spanish
this semester.
As the thiv lecture sponsored by,
the Spanish ub, Prof. Jose M. Al-
baladejo, of the romance languages
department, spoke yesterday on archi-
tecture as an aspect of social life in
Spain.

Stockwell Hall Honors First
Coed, Prof. Litzenberg Says

-- Daily Air Photo By Bogle.

New Women's Residence
For 388, Libraries Ai
Madelon Louisa Stockwell Hall,
latest link in the University's newlyr
integrated chain of residence halls
for men and women, is a fitting tri-
bute to Mrs. Charles K. Turner, nee
Madelon Louisa Stockwell, the first
woman student who was permitted to
matriculate here, Prof. Karl Litzen-,
berg, director of residence halls, de-
clared yesterday.
Entering in 1870 with advanced
credits from Albion College, Mrs..
Turner graduated two years later re-
ceiving her ABB. degree. The Uni-
versity paid tribute to her pioneer
spirit by conferring upon her an hon-
orary M.A. degree irr-1912.
Mrs. Turner died June 7, 1924, in
Kalamazoo at the age of 79 years.
Her wants were simple and she lived
the life of a recluse il the last years.
of her life. Prior to her death, Mrs.
Turner had announced her intention
to leave a large sum of money to
Albion College for the building of a
woman's dormitory, where her father
was the first president. During the
investigation following her death, it
was found that Mrs. Turner had left
no will, so her desire to finance a
woman's residence hall could not be
fulfilled.
Stockwell Hall has rooming facili-
ties. for 388 women. At present 276
reside there. Of this number 117 are
freshman, 62 are sophomores, 34 are

17

Has Rooming Facilities
id Recreation Rooms
juniors, eight are seniors and 57 are
graduates.
Student waitresses serve the 900
meals whic hare prepared daily in the
central kitchen. Two large cafeteria
counters facilitate the serving of
breakfasts.
A laundry room, a library, a recrea-
tion hall and a reception room is,
located in each of the two wings
which comprise Stockwell Hall.
Prof. Remer To Talk
On Streit Proposals'
International organization and the
Streit Proposal will be the subject of
a lecture to be presented by Prof. C.
F. Remr of the economics depart-
ment in conjunction with a church-
men's dinner at 6:30 p.m. tomorrow
in the Congregational Church.
The plan for a federal union of
democracies to be discussed by Pro-
fessor Remer is the proposal outlined
in "Union Now" by Clarence Streit.
Dr. Leonard A. Parr will be master
of ceremonies and President C. A.
Sink of the music school will be in
charge of musical arrangements.
Reservations are still available.

New Volume
Will Discuss
Meeting Here
Publication On Commerce
Study, Edited By Phelps,
Is To Appear Saturday
Proceedings of a Conference on
Economic Relations with L a t i n
America, edited by Prof. D. M. Phelps
of the School of Business Adminis-
tration, will appear Saturday, as the
sixth number of the Michigan Busi-
ness Series issued by the Bureau of
Business Research.
In the publication are assembled
the opinions of national authorities
on this timely subject. said Professor
Phelps, chairman of the committee in
charge of the Conference. The Con-
ference was held here in the summer
of 1939 as a part of the Institute of
Latin American Studies, of which
Prof. Preston E. James of the geog-
raphy department was director.
Sessions considering the general
topics of" The Future of Foreign In-
vestment in Latin America" and
"Measures for Facilitating Trade Be-
tween the Americas," were led by
Henry F. Grady, assistant Secretary
of 'State, and William S. Culbertson,
former ambassador to Chile.
The introduction to the publica-
tion prepared by Culbertson, studies
the recent decision of the Mexican
Supreme Court on expropriation of
American oil companies' property.
Culbertson's contribution composes a
comprehensive review and interpre-
tation of many other important
events since the Conference, Profes-
sor Phelps said.
Greenman Delivers Talk
On Washtenaw Indians
Indians of Washtenaw County were
discussed by Dr. Emerson F. Green-
man, assistant curator, division of
Great Lakes of the University Mu-
seum of Anthropology, last night at
the regular meeting of the Washte-
naw County Historical Society in the
Rackham Building. Dr. Greenman's
talk kvas illustrated with lantern
slides.
The meeting was opened by Prof.
Lewis G. Vander Velde of the his-
tory department, director of the
Michigan Historical Collections and
president of the society.

Here Is
In

Summary

With a demonstration of finger-
printing at Slauson school, the Junior
Chamber of Commerce will inaugurate
its program of fingecrprinting childrenf
in the local public schools today.
Permission has been granted the
Chamber by the Board of Education
to take the fingerprints of all chil-
dren who have their parents' permis-
sion. Actual fingerprinting will begin
at Slauson school Friday.
Prints will be sent to the Federal
Bureau of Investigation for its civilian
files.
Announcement of the date of
the fifth annual Ann Arbor Civic
Night yesterday brought with it
the statement that Dr. Frederick
Alexander, head of Michigan
State Normal's Music Depart-
ment, will be the guest conductor
for the program, to be held April
3. The Civic Night is held an-
nually to encourage local music
groups and to foster participation
in music. General chairman is
Hardin A. VanDeursen of the
School of Music.
* *
State Superintendent of Education
Dr. Eugene B. Elliott will address the
bi-annual Washtenaw county school
officers meeting here Thursday on
"Better Schools" . . . Major Paul J.
Vevia. regular army instructor for
tle 126th regiment, located at Grand
Rapids, will give Co. K, Ann Arbor's
division of the Michigan National
Guard, its annual federal once-over
March 5. In preparation, all mem-
bers are being innoculated against
typhoid and smallpox. Don't ask
why . . . In an attempt to raise
money for pictures for its classrooms,
Jones School is holding an exhibition
of 150 paintings by famous artists to-
day, tomorrow and Friday. A small
admission fee will be charged.

Tentative plans for a Spring Vaca-
tion tour of eastern industrial plants,
from April 6-14, were announced re-
cently by Eta Kappa Nu, honorary
electrical engineering society.
Probable principal stopping places
will be Niagara Falls, Pittsburgh,
Schenectady, New York City and
Washington, D.C.
This itinerary will make possible
inspection tours selected from among
the following plants:
Long Distance Building of the
American Telephone and Telegraph
Co.; Carborundum Co.; Vorning Glass
Works; Federal- Shipbuilding and
Orydock Co.; Schenectady Works of
the General Electric Co.; Internation-
al Business Machines Corp.; Aliquip-
pa Works or the Continuous Strip and
Sheet Mill of the Jones and Laugh-
lin Steel Corp.; La Guardia Field,

ards and the Federal Bureau of In-
vestigation.
The trip can be reduced to a low
unit cost if a sufficient number of
students go. The over-all cost will
include transportation by chartered
bus, lodging, meals and a few dollars
to spend.
Union Calls For Tryouts
Tryouts for the Michigan Union
are invited to attend a meeting at 5
p.m. today in Room 304 of the Union,
according to Don Treadwell, '40,
president. Eligible second semester
freshmen will be interviewed for po-
sitions at this time.

'j

New York City's air terminus and
municipal airport; Niagara Falls
Power Co.; New York Shipbuilding
Corp.; Westinghouse Electric and
Manufacturing Co.; Bureau of Stand-

Only Three Days
to the
ICE CARNIVAL
-Tickets on Sale
at the Union -

Ann Arbor

Eastern Factory TonrIs Planned
By Engineering Honor Society

Today's

News

;;

kk

1

PROF. TEEQUIZ' says:

'

NOW! Daily 2 - 4 -7- 9 P.M.

I'

Classified Directory

F

PLAY PRODUCTION.
DEPARTMENT OF SPEECH
presents
CAES1AR"
by WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE
TONIGHT at 8:30 P.M.
Thursday, Friday, Saturday at 8:30 P.M.
Saturday Matinee - 2:30 P.M.
LYDIA MENDELSSOHN THEATRE
Prices: 75c, 50c, 35c Phone 6300

1I

QUESTION: Is your home in Flint? If so, what
does a 'round trip' by telephone cost?
ANSWER: 45 cents during the day; only 35 cents
nights after 7 or any time Sundays, for a
3-minute station-to-station call.
That's how little it costs to keep in touch by telephone.
Rates to other points are proportionately low . . . See
page 5 in the telephone directory or ask "Long Distance"
(dial 0).
RATES FOR THREE-MINUTE NIGHT AND
SUNDAY STATION-TO-STATION CALLS

1. "_'

" l

THE MICHIGAN DAILY
CLASSIFIED
ADVERTISING
RATES
Effective as of February 14, 1939
12c per reading line (in basis of
five average words to line) for one
10c per reading line for three or
or two insertions.
nore insertions.
Minimum of 3 lines per inser-
tUon.
These low rates are on the basis
of cash payment before the ad is
inserted. If it is inconvenient for
you to call at our offices to make
payment, a messenger will be sent
to pick up your ad at a slight extra
charge of 15c.
For further information call
23-24-1, or stop at 420 Maynard
Street.
TYPING-18
TYPING-Experienced. Miss Allen,
408 S. Fifth Ave. Phone 2-2935 or
2-1416. _34
VIOLA STEIN-Experienced typist
and notary public, excellent work,
706 Oakland, phone 6327. 20
LAUNDERING -9
LAUNDRY - 2-1044. Sox darned.
Careful work at low prices. 16
ACE HAND LAUNDRY--Wants only
one trial to prove we launder your
shirts best. Let our work help you
look neat today. 1114 S. Univer-
sity. 19
TRANSPORTATION -21
WASHED SAND AND GRAVEL -
Driveway gravel, washed pebbles.
Killins Gravel Company. Phone
7112. 13
WANTED-TO BUY-4
HIGHEST CASH PRICE paid for
your discarded wearing apparel,
Claude Brown, 512 S. Main Street.
146
TYPEWRITERS
OF ALL MAKES
Office and Portable Models

STRAYED, LOST, FOUND-1
GOLD GRUEN watch lost at basket-
ball game Saturday night, Inscrip-
tion, "To Ira." Ira Katz, 2006
Washtenaw, 2-4409. Reward. 285
MISCELLANEOUS--20
SINGING CANARIES $5 and $6. Fe-
males $1. Strawberry Finches $4.50
pair. Feeds, cages. Ruffins, phone
5330.
SPECIAL-$5.50 Machineless Per-
manent $2.50; $3 oil cocona $1.50;
end permanent $1. Shampoo and
fingerwave 35c. Phone 8100, 117
Main. 36
WANTED-Girl to share accredited
5-room apartment one block from
campus. Expenses low. Call 5659
HELP WANTED
HELP WANTED: Girl student for
small amount of work exchanged
for room and breakfast. Telephone
2-2940. 287
FOR RENT
ROOM: Inner-spring mattress, three
showers, ping pong. Telephone
4844. Miss Lombard. 807 S. State,
286

Alpena ..........j$ .$60
Bad Axe ...........40
Bay City ..........35
Benton Harbor ......50
Big Rapids.........45
Columbus, O. ......45
Detroit .......... . .30
Grand Rapids .......40
Indianapolis, Ind. .. .55

Kalamazoo .......
Lansing ....
Marquette .......
Mr. Clemens.....
Niles ............
Pontiac ..........
Saginaw .........
Sault Ste. Marie .. .
Washington, D.C. .

.35
.35
.85
.35
.45
.30
.35
.80
.85

On a call for which the
charge is 50c or more,
a federal tax applies.

Extra
"ROYAL RODEO"
CARTOON - NEWS
Friday I
"Fighting 69th"

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-Ad

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ANN ARBOR to:

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MICHIGAN BELL TELEPHONE

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,

Christian Science Organization

at the University of Michigan

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN
eA nnounces

A

FREE

LECTURE

ON

CHRISTIAN

SCIENCE

I

by
JAMES G. ROWELL, C.S.B+
KANSAS CITY, MISSOURI
Membership of the Board of Lectureship of The Mother Church,
The First Church of Christ, Scientist, in Boston, Massachusetts
ait

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New and
Reconditioned
Bought, Sold,
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