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May 08, 1940 - Image 7

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1940-05-08

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WEDNESDAY, MAY 8, 1940

THE MICHIGAN- DA ILY

PAGE SEVEN

0

Meet Planned
For Extension
Services Here
Will Be 25th Anniversary
Of Annual Conferences
On Extension Problems
The National University Extension
Association composed of 52 colleges
and universities in the United States
and its dependencies will meet May
15 thru May 18 in Ann Arbor, Dr.
Charles A. Fisher, vice president of
the organization and director of the
Extension Service here, announced
yesterday.
For its 25th annual conference,
the Association has chosen as its
theme "Objectives of University Ex-
tension in the Next Quarter Cen-
tury."
Delegates attending the three-day
silver anniversary session will hear
President Alexander G. Ruthven and'
Dr. W. D. Henderson, director emer-
itus of the University Extension Ser-
vice keynote the formal banquet.
Speakers representing colleges and
universities from almost every state
in the nation will discuss such sub-
jects as the development of visual
istruction as a University exten-
sion service, labor's educational pro-
gram and the universities, and inte-
grated adult education program on
a statewide basis and federal aid
for general university extension.
Also featured during the mneeting
will be a trip to Henry Ford's Green-
field Village as well as breakfast
roundtables, small group meetings
and general sessions.
California Theatre Group
Offers Prizes For Plays'
The Berkeley Playmakers, a Cali-
fornian Thespian group, is offering
100 dollars for the best original play
submitted in their current one-act
playwrighting competition.
The contest, open to all aspiring
American writers, offers additional
cash and other prizes, with a special
award for the best comedy. The
Berkeley Playmakers will also pro-
duce the winning plays.

Distribution Of Recorded Music)1
Praised By Professor Maddy
By DAVID LACHENBRUCH 4fhe went on a 28,000 mile "music
Prof. Joseph E. Maday, of the Uni- trip" around the country, where he
versity Extension Division, well-known served as conductor of numerous
radio music authority, returning to large state festival groups, notably
Ann Arbor after an absence of threeI in Georgia, Florida, North Carolina,
months, expressed approval of he Tennessee and West Virginia. He al-
Michigan Music Appreciation Corn- I so attended the Music Educators'
mittee's distribution of the phono- National Congress, of which he is re-
graph recordings of 12 symphonic tiring vice-president, in Los Angeles,
masterpieces. and went to Hollywood to complete
These compositions which include; negotiations with Paramount for the

New Free Press Owner Congratulated

University-Sponsored Dictionary
Is Ten Years From Completion

works by Beethoven, Schubert, De-,
bussy, Tschaikowski, Brahms, Mo-
zart and Franck will be available at
the Association's headquarters at 601
William Street, corner of Maynard.,
The first of these symphonies, Tschai-
kowsky's fourth, may be obtained to-
day, and the remaining 11 will be
released one a week.
'Explodes Virtucso Isubble'
"In addition to making available
master works of music performed
by the greatest orchestras at very
low cost," Professor Maddy pointed
out, "the Music Appreciation Com-
mittee is doing much toward explod-
ing the virtuoso-conductor bubble
which has become almost a menace
to the development of music in Amer-
ica." These recordings, he continued,
"played by unidentified orchestras
and conductors, emphasize the fact
that great music needs no eye-ap-
peal."
To illustrate this point, Professor
Maddy laughingly commented that
"Stokowski's beautiful fingers don't
show on the records."
"The fact that the most critical
musicians are unable to identify the
orchestras or conductors proves that
the so-called virtuosity among con-
ductors is largely showmanship and is
not reflected in the music as heard,"
Professor Maddy maintained. "When
this fact is established the young
American conductor will at last have
an opportunity in his own country
-and there are many who can quali-,
fy when given the chance."
These recordings are being sold at
a price of from $1.59 to $1.98 for
each complete symphony. Deluxe
editions of records, in albums are
sold between $2.39 and $2:98. The
prices vary according to the number
of records in the symphony.
During Professor Maddy's absence

motion picture, "Interlochen", based
on life at the Interlochen Music
Camp, of which he is president.
New European
Crises Impends
Dutch, Balkans Threatened
In Nazis' Newest Moves
(Continued from Page 1)
way, when that port was suddenly}
seized by the Germans at the start1
of the invasion.
Egypt In Wa r Drill
ALEXANDRIA, May 7.-UP)-Al-
lied and Egyptian military author-
ities tonight enforced a test of1
Egypt's air raid refenses, darkening
the entire nation, from desert vil-
lages to the largest cities, in the start
of a week-long drill.
Thousands of British soldiers and
Egyptian police kept up a patrol.
Alpha Nu Elects Shepard
President For Next Year
George Shepard, '41, last night was
elected president of Alpha Nu, honor-
ary speech society, for the forthcom-
ing year. Other officers are: Elmer
Radka, '42, vice-president; William
Altman, '42, secretary, and Richard
Steudel, '41, treasurer.
Altman was the only present offi-
cer reelected. The others were: John
Williams, '43, president; Alfred Breck-
ler, '42, vice-president, and Bernard
Donahoe, '40, treasuer.

By DAVID ENGEL
About 10 years from now the world
will hear that at the University of
Michigan a milestone in English lit-
erature has been passed with the com-
pletion of something different in
English dictionaries after almost 20
years of intensive work.
This work, sponsored by the Uni-
versity and directed by Dr. Thomas
A. Knott includes the language of
the Middle English Period, 1100 to
1475, in addition to the regular spok-
en English.
Dr. Knott, director of this monu-
mental task, known most for his work
as general editor of the Webster In-y
ternational Dictionary, believes the
chief value of the dictionary will be
in its aiding scholars, teachers and
students in studying and understand-
ing the customs, thought, and cul-
ture of the times through its more
exact and thorough definition of the
language of the period. The scope of
the dictionary includes the lawless
period in European history leading up
to the establishment of comparative
order and security in the lives of the
European peoples.
According to Dr. Knott, this new
Middle English Dictionary will con-
tain about 50,000 distinct words and
about 100,000 definitions. The dic-
tionary is expected to be a more ex-
act and thorough work than the Ox-
ford English Dictionary, the only
other volume which attempts to cover
this field. While many of the Oxford
Dictionary's definitions are traced
to 14th, 15th and 16th century manu-
scripts, this new work tracks down
earlier origins, 11th, 12th and 13th
centuries, for its definitions.
The procedure in tracking down
these words and their definitions is
a tedious process as described by the
director. The worker has to read old
manuscripts and select words in quo-!
tations. It is only from quotations
that the worker can see how the word
is used and thus write an exact defi-
nition. The quotations are culled out
and sent to the editorial staff writers
who then proceed to write the defini-
tions.
The production staff working on
the fifth floor of Angell Hall, at pres-
-nt nunbers 12, including some work-

ers selected from the WPA and the
NYA.
An interesting section of the dic-
tionary is devoted to surnames. Such
last names existing during the Middle
English Period as Hardhead, Bigbelly,
Ragamuffin and Crowfoot, are in-
cluded.
The Oxford University Press, Eng-
land, has been selected to publish the
volume. This organization was cho-
sen because it has the best facilities
for setting up and printing such
works. This process is expected to
take several years to complete. Pres-
ent plans call for sending over por-
tions of the dictionary at a time.
However, the present war in Europe
has made plans uncertain,
German Club
Hears, Lecture

Prof.
On

Nordmeyer Speaks
Poetry,_Painting

John S. Knight (right), new president and editor-in-chief of the
Detroit Free Press, and J. H. Barry (left), new general manager, are
shown reading messages of congratulations after Knight had purchased
Michigan's oldest daily from E. D. Stair.
Architecture Photos Wolverine Posts
Are On Display Here Filled For 1940-41
An exhibit of photographs of re- At the annual general election
cent architectural work in Florida is meeting of the Michigan Wolverine
now on view from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday evening five vacancies were
daily except Sunday untie May 22 filled on the Board of Directors for
in the ground floor corridor cases of the coming year by members of the
the College of Arenitecture and De- cooperative restaurant.
sign. New members of the nine-man
The photographs, taken by Igor B. Board are Galvin Keene, '40, Arthur
Polesvitzky and T. Trip Russell, archi- Kepka, '41L, John Scheibe, '42M,
tects of Miami Beach, Fla., are of ex- John Spencer, '41E, and Kenneth
teriors and interiors of the modern Nordstrom, '41L. Scheibe and Kepka
work now being done in the state. are beginning second terms.

Reviewing the characteristic ele-
ments of late German romanticism
Prof. Henry W. Nordmever, head of
the German department presented
last night an illustrated lecture to
members of the Deutscher 7zrein at
the League.
Prof. Nordmeyer pointed out how
these characteristics were brought
in the music, painting and poetry of
the age. He quoted the romantic
poetry of Eichendorff and Bretano.
Slides were also shown of paintings
of Carl Spitzweg, Moritz von Sch-
wind, A. L. Richter and Arnold
Boecklin. Prof. Nordmeyer then
played a recording of Brahms of
"Der Mond Steht uber dem Benge."
He emphasized that the common
romantic characteristics were a
yearning for the infinite, a supreme
love of nature, the use of mythology,
and a view towards the return of
the middle ages.
This talk concluded a series of
five lectures sponsored by the
Deutscher Verein.

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