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May 03, 1940 - Image 10

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1940-05-03

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY AY, E 40

Informglity To Mark Workshop
Program Of Educational School

Clements Library Houses Noted Historical Collection

Frencli House Reestablished
For Additional Vocal Trailiin

Informality will be the keynote of
the annual Workshop in Curriculum
and Instruction conducted by the
faculty of the School of Education
for teachers, supervisors, and admin-
istrators who lave educational prob-
lems requiring research and who seek
the opportunity of sharing the con-
sultation, social, and recreational
facilities cfiered during the Summer
Session.
In the organization of the Work-
shop thei. are no formal classes or
extended lecture courses. Each mem-
ber of the program selects a definite
problem and formulates a plan for
work under the guidance of a staff
member. These individual plans are
then grouped into two classification,
subject-matter areas and general
fields including community studies,
guidance and evaluation of curricu-
lim.i
Speakers Prominent
Graduate students enrolling in the
course will meet daily to hear one
of a number of prominent educators
discuss problems common to all
fields of study. Among those in-
cluded on this informal lecture series
will beProfessor-Emeritus'William
C. Bagley of Teachers' College 0ol1
umbia University, Mr. George H.
Fein, assistant state superintendent
of public inrstructioi for Michigan(

Dr. Rudolph Lindquist, director of
Cranbrook School, and Dr. Fritz
Redl, research expert in secondary
education.
Raleigh Schorling To Speak
Following this program all mem-'
bers of the Workshop will lunch to-I
gether in the School of Education
and will participate in discussion sec-I
tions centered on the morning lec-
ture. Planned by the members, rec-
reation and social functions will be
outlined from week to week. Late
each afternoon tea will be served to
give students and visiting members
of the faculty an opportunity to be-
come well acquainted.
To Lunch Together
Directed by Dr. Raleig Schorling,
supervisor of directed teaching; the
staff will consist of nineteen mem-
bers of the faculty of the School of
Educetion, University High and El-
ementary Schools, and the Summer
Session. Among the five special in-
structors wall be Mr. J. Cecil Parker,
who has recently acted as adviser
for high schools revising their cur-
riculums. Dr. F. G. Langford of
the University of Virginia will serve
as supervisory assistant in science
and mathematics while Mr. George
McCune of the University of Minne-
sota will be the consultant in social
studies.

Le Foyer Francais, the traditional
French House for women residence
will be instituted again this summer
for students who wish additional
training in oral French.
Organized under the leadership of
Prof, Charles Koelia of the romance
languages aepartment in 1936, the
house has been one of the centers of
foreign language study during each
succeeding Summer Session. Its pur-
pose is to make possible greater flu-
ency in French for those living in
the house where only French is spok-
en.
As in previous years the Kappa Al-
pha Theta House will be used to house
approximately 20 students. Besides
those who room and board at the

house, provisions are made for men
and other women students to be ad-
mitted to luncheon and dinner as
regular boarders or for occasional
meals.
The directrice this year will be
Miss Jeanne Rousselet of Goucher
College assisted by Miss Deirdre Mc-
Mullan. Faculty director will be
Prof. Antoine Jobin of the romance
languages department, replacing Pro-
fessor Koella, who is teaching at
Pennsylvania State College this sum-
mer.
Application for the house may be
made through the Office of the Dean
of Women accompanied by a state-
ment in French of the applicants
training.

The William L. Clements library, shown above, houses one of the most complete. collections of Amer-
ican historical papers in existence. It is a gift of the late Regent William L. Clements.
Ca psWriterps T Prtciqt
For Prizes OfSmer Hopwoods,

IMEMO f Mademilselle

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at ColUin4

You'll find all manner of
smart, cool fashions for
the going-on in town.
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The gold of Avery and Jule Hop-
wood will be dangled before the eyes
of campus writers again this summer
in order to lure them from the swim-
pool or tennis court and plant them
before their typewriters.
Under the terms of the will of
Mr. Hopwood, prominent American
dramatist and member of the class
of 1905, one-fifth of his estate was
set aside and given to the Regents
of the University for the encourage-
ment of creative work in writing. In
the eight years the awards have been
given they have amounted to nearly
$10,000 per year.
Regents Have Control
According to the bequest the Re-
gents are empowered-To invest and
keep the same invested and to use
the income therefrom in perpetuity,
as prizes to be known as "The Avery
Hopwood and Jule Hopwood Prizes,"
to be awarded annually to students
in the Department of Rhetoric of the
University of Michigan who perform
the best creative work in the field
of dramatic writing, fiction, poetry
and the essay. The number and value
of the prizes shall be in the discretion
of the Faculty or other governing
body of the University, but the in-
come shall be distributed annually
or semiannually, and shall not be
allowed to accumulate from year to
year."
As a declaration of independence
for writers, the bequest stipulates
"that the students competing for the
prizes shall not be confined to aca-
demic subjects, but shaall be allowed
the widest possible latitude, and that

the new, the unusual, and the radical
shall be especially encouraged."
The rules of the contest state that
"there shall be eight awards, one
of $75 and one of $50 in each of
the four fields of writing-drama, es-'
say, fiction and poetry."
Further Rules Listed
In practice, however, there is
greater latitude. Five students were
awarded a total of $225 in last sum-
mer's essay contest, three others won
$125 in the fiction division, and four
poetry entries brought $150.
The rules of eligibility are these:
1. All regularly enrolled students
of the Summer Session who have
been doing work of passing grade in
all course work up to the time manu-
scripts must be handed in, and who
are enrolled in one course in English
composition in the Department of
English or in the Department of
Journalism are eligible to compete-
except students who have already
won a major award in a Hopwood
contest.
2. No manuscript which has re-
ceived a prize in any Hopwood con-
test shall be considered eligible in
these contests.
3. No manuscript that wins an
award in the Summer Session contest
is eligible in any subsequent Hop-
wood contest.
Further Rules Listed
4. No manuscript or part of a
manuscript that has been published
in a medium other than a college
magazine o college newspaper shall
be eligible.
In the preparation of manuscripts,
the most difficult rule to abide by

is the one requiring that "three
copies of each unit of composition
shall be submitted." Entries must
be bound in a cover. Unbound manu-
scripts, manuscripts fastened togeth-
er merely with paper clips, and other
mantuscripts not likely to remain
bound together will be rejected by
the committee.
To insure an im partial considera-
tion on the part of the judges, tht'
following rules are added: On the
title page of the manuscript shall
appear (1) the name and character
of the composition; (2) a nom de
plume; (3) a statement that the
manuscript is submitted in the cate-
gory of drama, essay, fiction, or
poetry.
The deadline is 4:30 p.m. Friday
of the seventh week of the summer
session. Anyone desiring further in-
formation may address Prof. A. W.,
Cowden, director of the Hopwood
Awards, 3227 Angell Hall.
Summer Seession Costs
Are Considerablly Less
(Continued from Page 9)
$50; for Camp Davis (surveying, geol-
ogy and botany) $45 and $60; for
Camp Filibert Roth (forestry) $50
and $65; and for the Biological Sta-
tion (botany and zoology) $50 and
$65.
Students who enroll for courses
that continue for five weeks or more
will be entitled to the privileges of the
Michigan Union or the Michigan
League, to the Health Service, and to
copies of The Michigan Daily.

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SPORT DRESSES, DRESSY
OUTFITS, AND FORMALS

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For Every Course on the Campus

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know are comfortable, and set
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at the same time. Playsuits for
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