100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

February 20, 1940 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1940-02-20

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

TUESDAY, FEB. 20, 1940

w

. rii'r

t

i

Scientist's

Lecture

Barbara Cahoon, '40, pianist, will
present a music recital at8:15 p..
today 'in the School of Music Audi-
torium in partial fulfillment of the
requirements for the degree of
Bachelor of Music.
Miss Cahoon, who is from Danville,
Vt., has been studying piano under
Prof. Joseph Brinkman, and will play
'Jardinps sous la Pluie" by Debussy,
Ravel's "Pavane pour une Infante De-
funte," Respighi's "Notturno" and
Ibert's "Marchande d'eau fraiche."

Here Tomorrow
Deals WitMagic
(Continued from Page 1)
backdrops, elaborate paraphernalia.
He performs everything beneath
bright lights under the closest scrut-
iny of audience representatives.
Third, Dr. Benedict repeats a
seeming violation of a natural law
four times in a form ever-irncreasing
in complexity and at all times, get-
ting the same results. Fourth, he
shows the role of misdirection as
bearing on the psychology of obser-
vation. Lastly, he es what he
calls "original effects" to stress the
uncertainty of relying on conven-
tional "controls" no =matter how
rigidly they are seemingly 'applied.
This lecture has been met with
wild enthusiasm by other collegiate
audiences. A story goes that Prince-
ton boys fought to get into the lec-
ture hall to hear Dr. Benedict. Every-
where, faculty men from schools such
as Stanford, Notre Dame and Cali-
fornia have praised the lecture and
asked that he return.

Remer Will Give
On 'Streit Proposal'

Debating Team
To Hold Tryout
Women's Group To Tali
On Federal Housing
Women interested in varsity debat-
ing will try out for six team positions
at 7:30 p.m. today in Room 3209 An-
gell Hall on the topic, "Resolved: That
the Federal Housing Administration
Program Should Not Be Renewed." 1
Requirement for tho tryouts is a
five minute speech on either side of
the question, stressing the part of
the Federal Housing Administration
program which calls for guaranteeing
loans for construction purposes, Mrs.
Frederic 0. Crandall, debate coach,
announced yesterday. The Act which
created the present program expires
in June, 1941.
Four women will be chosen to take
the negative side of the question. One
of these two teams will leave for the
University of Purdue, March 12, and
the other will debate an Indiana Uni-
versity squad here March 14. An af-
firmative team of two people will
argue with another Indiana Univer-
sity team here the same day.
Other teams may be chosen from
those who tryout today to compete in
contests which have not been sched-
uled yet, Mrs. Crandall said.
Prof. Albaladejo
To Speak Today
"Spanish Architecture" will be the
subject of a talk by Prof. Jose Albal-
adejo, of the romance languages de-
partment, to be given at 4:15 p.m. to-
day in Room 213 Angell Hall, The
lecture, one of a series of six spon-
sored by La Sociedad Hispanica, will
be preceded by a short resume in
English and will be illustrated by
slides.
The Club will hold tryouts for its
annual play, "Zaragueta," at 3 p.m.
Thursday in Room 312, Romance
Languages Building. The play, a
"comedy of customs" by Ramos Car-
rion and Vital Aza, will be presented
April 1. Characters include seven
men and four women ,and any stu-
dent is eligible to try out.
At the meeting of the club tomor-
row night in the League, a motion
picture and a talk will be presented.
All members are urged to be present.

lic 69eh 4
Arch Agenda, an analysis and di-
gest of engineering activities hereby
takes form as an irregular feature in
the pages of The Daily. Its purpose
and design are blended toward the
end of bringing to the engineer the
activity program of his college, terse-3
ly and completely.'
With no definite publication sched-
ule before us, we propose to dash into
print whenever sufficient material is
available, and to this end, we will be,
glad to receive your contributions.
Now for the Agenda:I
Student members of the American'
Institute of Electrical Engineers have'
been invited to attend the meetings of
the Michigan chapter at 8 p.m. today
in the Amphitheatre of the Rackham
Building. William E. Wickenden,
president of the Case School of Ap-
plied Science, Cleveland, will speak
on "College and Career," and F. M.
Farmer, national president of the
A.I.E.E. and chief engineer of the
Electrical Testing Laboratories in
New York City, will present a discus-
sion on the work of the Institute.
Eta Kappa Nu will lead off today
with the first in a series of trips and
talks. Scheduled for 4;30 p.m. is an
inspection tour of the physics depart-
ment's 10 million volt cyclotron and
the ultra short wave generators devel-
oped by Prof. Neil H. Williams of the
physic department. The group will
meet in Room 247 of the West En-
gineering Building.
Fundamentals of the Oldsmobile
automatic transmission will be ex-
plained to S.A.E. members at 7:30
p.m. in the Union in a slide-illustrat-
ed talk.
Meetings tomorrow: A.T.Ch.E.,
sound motion picture on "filter aids;"
I.Ae.S., sound picture on "Trans-Paci-
fic;" and A.S.M.E., talk on "Labor
Relations."
The youngest member of the Texas
legislature is a student at East Texas
State Teachers College.

Prof. Christian
Will Present
Organ Recital
Prof. Palmer Christian of the
School of Music will initiate the sea-j
son's second series of Organ recitals at"
4:15 p.m. tomorrow in Hill Auditor-'
ium by playing a new sonata for organ'
by Percy Whitlock, English composer
and organist.
Next week Professor Christian will
play a number of compositions by'
contemporary Dutch, French, Ger-
man and American composers includ-
ing the First Sonata by Paul Hinde-
mith. On March 13, assisted by
Thelma Newell, violinist, and Helen
Titus, pianist, of the faculty, he will
present the Grieg Sonata for violin
and piano.
Claire Coci, a former student, will
be guest recitalist on March 20. She
made her first transcontinental tour
last season creating, according to
President Charles A. Sink, "a pro-
found impression on her audiences
from coast to coast."
Professor Christian will play his an-
nual Good Friday program on March
22 as has been his custom during
past years. His program will consist
of a number of selections pertinent
to the significance of the day.
Tapping And Brandt Plan
To Visit Alumni Meeting
T. Hawley Tapping, general secre-
tary of the Alumni Association, and
Prof. Carl G. Brandt of the English
department will attend a meeting to-
day of the University of Michigan
Club of Youngstown. Color movies
of campus life and movies of the
Michigan-Ohio State football game
will be shown.

(Ed. note: This is the first in a series
of' articles explaining student govern-
ment on the campuses of American
universities and colleges).
Student government at the Uni-
versity of Pennsylvania is character-
ized by the compactness of the gov-
erning unit. Problems of all phases
of student affairs are taken under
consideration by an all-powerful Un-
dergraduate Council composed of reg-
ularly elected members from the
student body-at-large and the heads
of various campus organizations.
Fraternity activities at Pennsyl-
vania are administered by an inter-
fraternity council as they are here,
but actual power in determining regu-
lations and policy for affiliated men
is invested in the Undergraduate
Council. Athletic problems are sub-
jected to study by the Council, as
are plans for all social activities such
as homecoming, class elections and
dances.
Past experience of Pennsylvania has

Penn Student Council Strong.

shown that separate bodies represent-
ing special interests on campus is not
the answer to successfulstudent gov-
ernment. Therefore, the present Unf
dergraduate Council was established
to coordinate the functions of the
smaller and varied organizations.
However, in order to make certain
that existing bodies have a voice in
the Council, its constitution provides
that the membership shall include in
addition to regularly student mem-
bers, the heads of every important
organization on campiis.
With influential students from the
campus newspaper, the fraternity
groups, class presidents, honor society
presidents, the Undergraduate Coun-
cil is assured cooperation from every
group of students on campus.

Drake University radio
broadcast 370 shows a year,
broadcasting stations.

students
over Iowa

DAILY AT 2:00 - 4:00 --7:00 - 9:00 P.M.-I

PLAY PRODUCTION

11

DEPARTMENT OF SPEECH
Presents

"jULIUS
CAESAR"
by WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE.
Box Office Now Open
LYDIA MENDELSSOHN THEATRE
Wednesday, Thursday, Friday, Saturday, 8:30 P.M.
Saturday Matinee, 2:30 P.m.
February 21, 22, 23, 24

How can Sherlock Holmes w BASIL RATHuON, NIGEL BRUCE
hope to fathom the IDA LPINO- ALAN MARSHAL
criminal genius, of h TsERYKILBRN GEORGE ZU
arch-enemy... in time? TEy KilBRN-OREZC
HENRY STEPHENSON .E; E. (LIVE

Don't tell the
Daily Editors!

All Ways the Best.
Demand a genuine ERD-BER Watch Strap.
Quality material, expert workmanship
make this strap the popular leader. Good
.looking, smart, priced from 75 cents up.
At better authorized jewelers,
E RD-BE R - Leather

I

"Royal
Rodeo"

Extrat Added
"Ice
Pond"

News of
The Day

5

I,

Duke Ellington's orchestra Is Com-
ing in Person on the Michigan Stage.

Prices: 75c, 50c, 35c

Phone 6300,

Coming Friday! "THE FIGHTING 69th"

t

_i#

w-.
k ~AV

I f Father

Did

the

WASHING

' _

If father did the washing it wouldn't get done, for
father would soon learn that the efficient way to
launder clothes is the laundry way. Quick de-
livery, efficient service, neat repair work, and
really clean clothes at a low price miake it worth
while to use your Ann Arbor laundries.

VARSITY LAUNDRY
23- 1-23

KYER LAUNDRY
4185

Thel Ann Arbor laundries have learned that
1 h sliuldill IJ: hs seiai Lat tdry demi ands, atdl
for just ipat reasou they have set special prices
on sideinIu idies. 'I' k advanttge of Lie
facIlities Anis Arbor offers you.
Have Your Laundry Done
tp I AIINDRY Wav

1

SAMPLE BU
2 SUITS OF UNDER
3 SHIRTS
6 HANDKERCHIEFS

NDLE

WEAR

WHITE SWAN LAUNDRY
and Dry Cleaning Company
4117
TROJAN LAUNDRY
and Dry Cleaning Company

3 PAIRS

OF SOCKS

2 BATH TOWELS
Approximate Cost... $1.10

I

,

r I

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan