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May 01, 1940 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1940-05-01

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

lY_ 1,_19.Q._ --

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Varsity Loses To State, 5-4,
As Rally In Ninth Falls Short

Early Wolverine Errors
Give Spartans Victory;
Ruehle'sTriple Wasted
(Continued from Page 1)

NotJitei...

I
l

three-bagger to right field, bring
Michigan to within one run of State,
and set himself up for the hero role
for the day.
But evidently the gods of baseball
had designated Ruehle for another1
role.
Bud Chamberlain was rushed in1
to bat for George Harms, but the best1
Chamberlain could do was a sharpI
grounder to Duncan. Ruehle held his
base while the Spartan shortstop
made the throw, but when Joe Kam-
erath, substitute first baseman, drop-
ped the ball, George foolishly de-]
cided to break for the plate.
He was thrown out by the prover-
bial city block.
But the spree wasn't over yet.
Pinch-hitter Johnny Erpelding then
singled to., center to send Chamber-
lain to second and the winning runs
were now on the bases. Charlie Pink'
and Mike Sofiak both grounded out,
however, and the game was over.
Michigan had jumped off to the
usual early lead in the second on
some clever base-running by Nelson.
With the bases loaded as a result of
hits by Trosko and little Davie and
a safe sacrifice by Ruehle, Harms hit
into a double play, Munroe to cat-
cher Bolster to Owen. By dint of
some speedy legging, Nelson scored
from second on the play.
The Spartans reached Jack Barry
for four runs in the third, however.
Duncan and Will Davis singled, both
advanced on a wild pitch and scored
on Paul Starck's bingle to left. Casey
Klewicki walked, he and Starck ad-
vanced after Harms had taken Ow-
en's foul fly back near 'the screen,
and rode home on Steve Jacubow-
ski's hit to left.
State chalked up what eventually
proved the winning run in the ninth
off Russ Dobson, who had replaced
Mickey Stoddard. A triple by Kle-
wicki and Owen's infield single did
the trick.

Mich. State-5
Morrison, 2b
Duncan, ss......
Will Davis, of .
Starck, cf......
Klewicki, 3b.....
Owen, lb.......
Kamerath, lb ..
Jacubowski, if ....
Bolster, c.......
Cramer, x
Manion, c......
Munroe, p......
Mekules, p . . .....

AB
5
5
5
4
4
3
5
2
1
1
5
0

l

Totals .... 41

Michigan-4 AB
Pink, cf ..........5
Sofiak, ss ........ 5
Evashevski, rf .... 3
Steppon, 2b .... 3
Trosko, If.......3
Nelson, 3b .. ......4
Ruehle, lb ...... 3
Harms, c .........3
Chamberlain, y .. 1
Barry, p .........1
Greenberg, z .... 1
Stoddard, p ...... 0
Holman, xx .......0
Dobson, p ........ 0
Veigel, p .........0
Erpelding, yy .... 1
Totals .... 33

R
0
1
1
1
0
0
0
,0
0
.0
5
0
0
0
1
1
2
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
4

H
0
2
4
1
2
1
1
3
0
1
0
0
10
15
H
1
0
1
0
2
2
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
8

A
4
4
0
0
2
1
0
1
0
0
2
0
17
A
0
1
0
2
0
3
0
0
0
1
0
1
1
0
1
0
9

El
0
1
0
0
0
0
1
0
0
0
0
3
E
0
0
0
4
1
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
6

N etters Open
Home Season
Kalamazoo Rivals Boast
Impressive Record
Kalamazoo College will help the
Michigan tennis team inaugurate its
home season at 3:30 p.m. today on
the Palmer Field courts.
Leading the Kazoo contingent is
Capt. Marian "Buck" Shane. Shane
is indubitably the top collegiate play-
er in the state. In two and one half'
years of varsity competition, Shane
has yet to lose a match. When one
stops to consider that he has
played the number one men of'
such institutions as Miami, North
Carolina, Alabama, Georgia, Wayne,
Michigan State, and Cincinnati, ten-
nis powers in every sense of the'
word, you realize the magnitude of
the job this tiny Titan of the break-
fast food town has accomplished.
Kalamazoo is also bringing to Ann
Arbor such fine performers as Eric
Pratt, Don Worth and Guy Garback,
all of whom have collaborated in the
winning of seven out of nine matches
this spring.
Capt. Sam Durst will oppose Shane
in the feature match. This past win-
ter Durst took Shane to three sets
in an indoor practice match at the
Sports Building, so it should prove
interesting to see if Durst can even
approach his previous outstanding
performance.
Jim Tobin's injured knee is still
the main topic of conversation and
interest to Coach Weir and the team.
As it stands today, Tobin will play
number two singles followed by Tom
Gamon, Wayne Stille, Harry Kohl and
Bob Jeffers at the three, four, five
and six spots respectively.
The number one doubles team of
Durst and Tobin will remain intact,
but there's a possibility that the
two and three combines will be shift-
ed about.

(Editor's Note: This week the col- a:
umnn is being written by the members1
of the junior sports staff who arel
applying for the position of sports
editor for the comng year. Today's
column is written by Norman Miller,
who has been covering varsity base- t
ball.) t
'King Carl' .. .
Of the great plethora of athletesc
that grace the American sportingY
scene, there is none who has gained1
our admiration more than Carl Owen
Hubbell, lanky screwball artist of the
New York Giants.
To us, Hubbell has always re-
presented all the ideals of good
sportsmanship, clean-living and
modesty so often found lacking in
professional athletes, in addition
to exemplifying the acme of mo-
dern pitching greatness.
"King Carl's" hurling ability needsI
no explanation. It speaks for it-
self.
He is the only active pitcher in
the National League who has wvon 200
games. He won 20 or more games
per season for five consecutive years
from 1933 to 1937; led the senior cir-
cuit in earned run averages in '33,
'34 and '36 with averages of 1.66, 2.30
and 2.46, respectively: won 24 straight
games (16 in 1936 and eight in 1937);
set a record of 46 consecutive score-
less innings in 1933; is the only pit-
cher in the last two decades who has
turned in two World Series victories
over the New York Yankees; and
holds a host of other marks that
have well-e'arned him the nickname
of "Meal Ticket" for the Giants.
Few baseball fans will ever
forget Hubbell's history-making
exploit in the 1934 major league
All-Star game when the lean pe-
can farmer from Meeker, Okla-
homa, struck out Babe Ruth,
Lou Gehrig, Jimmy Foxx, Al Sim-
mons and Joe Cronin, six of the
heaviest hitters in the American
League, in the first two inings.
But there's a story behind the fact
that places the gaunt left-hander in

IN THIS CORNER
By MEL FINEBERG_

I

Ri
........

in even grander light. It's told by
"Gabby" Hartnett, who caught Hub-
bell that afternoon.
"I could see from thR look on his
face that 'Hub' wasn't too keen on
throwing all those tough pitches I
was calling," revealed Hartnett, after
the game. "But rather than make
me look like a chump by shaking me
off before that packed ball park, he
risked the strain on his arm and cut
loose with whatever I signalled for."
Today, at the age of 36, Hub-
bell still ranks one of the great-
est pitchers in the game. An
operation for the removal of a
chipped bone in his elbow at the
end of the 1938 season has taken
the zip out of his fast ball and
the sharp break out of his one
time baffling curves.
All the old master has left is the
ghost of his inimitable screwball, his
impeccable control, a stout heart and
a keen pitching brain ripened by 12
years of experience in the big show.
There's nothing colorful about
Hubbell unless it's the peculiar box-
shaped manner in which he fixes his
baseball pants. He's never been
thrown out of a game for arguing with
an umpire; he never squabbles with
managers (and that aspect of his
good nature is even more noteworthy
in view of the oft-times exacting de-
mands of his manager, Bill Terry, and
the New York front office never has
any trouble with Hub over salary
arrangements.
Old "Square Pants" started
the Giants' opener against
the Phillies a few weeks ago. His
assignment didn't attract the
dazzling press notices that pre-
ceded Dizzy Dean's initial appear-
ance, nor did Hub come through
with a sensational no-hitter like
Bob Feller.
In fact, his was a typical Hubbell
performance. For six innings he
toiled wearily behind a scant 1-0
lead. Then, in the seventh, a hit,
an error by a rookie infielder on an
easy double play ball, and a slip-up

Dodger Hurler
Gets No-Hitter
Carleton Pitches Brooklyn
To NinthStraight Win
CINCINNATI, April 30. -OP)-
James Otto (Tex) Carleton, a 33-
year-old refugee from the minors,
stalked into baseball's no-hit hall
of fame today by pitching the un-
defeated Brooklyn Dodgers to a 3 to!
0 triumph over the Cincinnati Reds.
It was the ninth straight victory
for the stampeding Dodgers, tying
a modern major league record for
consecutive wins at the start of the
season-a string last attained by the
New York Giants in 1918.
It also was the second no-hit game
of the young season, coming two
weeks to the day after Bob Feller
shaped his opening day spectacle
for the Cleveland Indians against
Chicago.
Carleton, a righthander who served
terms with the St. Louis Cardinals
and Chicago Cubs and got into one
World Series with the former and two
with the latter, was one of several
free agents the Dodgers picked up
during the winter.
Kolesar Out With Injury
Recurrence of an ola knee injury
in last Saturday's scrimmage has
forced Bob Kolesar, promising fresh-
man guard from Cleveland, to drop
out of spring practice, it was re-
ported last night.
that enabled Gus Suhr to catch hold
of one of his pitches for a home run,
and "King Carl" was defeated, 3-1.
Yet that's the way it's always been.
Hubbell never did have a gang of
DiMaggio's, Dickeys, Medwicks or
Greenberg's behind him. When the
feather-hitting Giants give him three
or four runs, it's an occasion for a
celebration.
But the slender southpaw never
complains, never berates a team-
mate for a costly blunder, never
pops off about his remarkable
feats.
But when the going gets tough-
est, when the chips are on the line,
we'll still take Carl Owen Hubbell for
our money. -N.M.

Relay Events
Will Feature
Illinois Meet
After word had been received from
Des Moines saying that Coach Ken
Doherty was "continuing to improve
and doing very well," Michigan's var-
sity track team turned its attention
to preparation for its home outdoor
debut against Illinois on Saturday
afternoon.
As they have been ever since last
year, the quarter-mile and one-mile
relay will be the number one attrac-
tions of the day. Warren Breiden-
bach, showing even greater ability
and strength than last year, will
match strides with the Illini captain,
Will McCown, who defeated him in-
doors at the Illinois Relays. Both
are capable of running around 47
seconds when in the pink of con-
dition, so the time should be better
than 48 even this early in the sea-
son. Also in the race and capable
of winning, are Michigan's Jack
Leutritz, the big junior who is at
his best outdoors where his stride
is not hampered by a multitude of
turns, and Phil Balyeat, whose in-
jured arch has hitherto kept him
from running as well as he can.
Michigan's trio of 440-men, plus
Bob Barnard or Jim Rae, will battle
the Illini in the relay. The visitors
have defeated the Wolverines in-
doors, and present one of the best
teams in the country. Michigan won
the Drake Relays in 3:16 last week,
FORDHAM UNIVERSITY
SCHOOL OF LAW
NEW YORK
Case System
Three-Year Day Course
Four-Year Evening Course
Co-educational
Member of the Assocaton of American
Law Schools
College Degree or Two Years of
College Work with Good Grades
Required for Entrance
Transcript of Record Must Be Furnished
Morning, Early Afternoon and
Evening Classes
For further information address
Registrar of Fordhom Law School
233 Broadway, New York

Michigan State .... 004 000 001-5
Michigan. ......... 010 000 003-4
x Batted for Bolster in 5th.
y Batted for Harms in 9th.
z Batted for Barry in 5th.
xx Batted for Stoddard in 8th.
yy Batted for Veigel in 9th.
Two base hit: Cramer. Three base
hits: Klewicki, Ruehle. Stolen bases:
Pink, Nelson, Manion. Sacrifices:
Owen, Ruehle. Double plays: Mun-
roe to Bolster to Owen; Duncan to
Bolster to Owen; Klewicki to Morri-
son to Owen. Left on bases: Michi-
gan 7; Michigan State, 10. Wild
pitch: Barry. Losing pitcher: Barry
Winning pitcher: Munroe. Umpires
Lindsay and Knode.

,

CHEERLEADING TRYOUTS
All eligible students, interested
in trying out as cheerleader,
should report at 5 P.M. today to
the north end of Yost Field House.
Art Treut
Head Cheerleader

. . .. ... ..

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