100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

April 19, 1940 - Image 7

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1940-04-19

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

""" 19THE MICHICAN DAitLY

PAGE

New Magazine
Plays Up Daily
In Photo Layout
Four Pages Of 'Varsity'
Devoted To Publications,
Students OfMichigan
A new collegiate news magazine,
Varsity, published in Chicago, found
its way to the nation's newsstands
yesterday with an illustrated sec-
tion on The Michigan Daily as one
of its prominent features.
Varsity, described by its editors as
the magazine of "the intercollegiate
sphere," used four pages of its first
issue to present "a few of the people
who will soon lay siege to city desks,
ready to face the responsibility for
influencing American public opin-
ion, anxious to play for keeps."
One of The Daily's editors pictured
is Editorial Director Elliott Maran-
iss, '40, of whom Varsity says: "Ace
Maraniss started as a barker at Coney
Island, served as a reporter for the
N.Y. Times, has worked his way at
Michigan."
Other editors portrayed are "bril-
liant" Women's Editor Ann Vicary,
"dynamic" City Editor Stan Swinton
and "ever-present and all-powerful"
Managing Editor Carl Petersen, all
'40.
Varsity's photographers also snap-
ped: Kay Forberg, '41, Lenton Scul-
thorp, '40, Jane Elpass, '40, Dennis
Flanagan, '40, John Malcolm Brin-
nin, '41, Tom Harmon, '40, and, in a
full-page fashion pose, - Jane Nuss-
baum, '40.
Varsity will be published fortnight-
ly and will be distributed on college
campuses throughout the country.
Newspaperman To Talkb
Here Next Wednesday
H.C.L. Jackson, Detroit News col-
umnist" who daily writes "Listening
Ifl On Detroit," will lecture here at
3 p.m. next Wednesday in Room E,
Haven Hall.
Mr. Jackson's talk will be one of
the supplementary lectures present-
ed during the semester by the Uni-
versity journalism department. In-
tere ted persons are invited by the
depatment to attend. The lecture
is free.

G. E. Densmore
Sees America
By 'Armchair'
Editor's Note: This is the seventh
in a series of short biographies of
noted campus figures.
By A. P. BLAUSTEIN
Prof. G. E. Densmore of the speech
department is a modest unassuming
man who is much prouder of his
collection of pictures of famous men
than of his own work in speech.
Born in Mason, Mich., Professor
Densmore attended grade school and
high school there before coming to
the University where he received his
Bachelor's degree in 1922. After that
he taught speech in a number of high
schools in the Upper Peninsula re-
turning to Michigan in 1924 to re-
ceive his M.A.
That same year Professor Dens-
more was made an instructor in
speech and in a short time was ap-
pointed assistant professor and asso-
ciate professor. He received his full
professorship in 1939 when he was
made chairman of the department.
Professor Densmore's hobbies, out-
side of his collection of pictures of
famous men which cover his office
walls, is reading American history
and being, what he calls "an arm-
chair traveler." At present he is
reading everything he can find on
the period between America's dis-
covery and the Revolutionary War.
He intends to extend his study to
the Civil War as soon as he has ex-
hausted the material on the earlier
period.
His work as a traveler consists
mainly of studying maps and figur-
ing the easiest ways of" getting from
one place to another. He has how-
ever traveled quite extensively out-
side of his armchair, and is one of
Michigan's most earnest advocates
of "See America First." /
In addition to his work at the Uni-.
versity Professor Densmore has served
as manager of the Michigan High
School Debating League, as the in-
structor of a number of big business
executives in public speaking and as
Executive Secretary of the National
Association of Teachers of Speech.
He was most active in the latter
position from which he resigned
when he became chairman of the
speech department.

British, Nazis Race For Trondheim

r-:

_....
9 A A " ..., .. e.

I -- - I -MM."

o
*

THE 4 .
JFAEROES
DEMN)9
SHETLAND
ORKNEY
.SV
4
0

NARY 1K
! ' +CT'IC~
CC~
It BERGEN
STAVANGER~ OL TCI1L~
4
NORTH
SEA AA*
ygG3

Student Pilots
To Enter Prize
FlightContest
A number of students in the Civil
Aeronautics Authority student flight
training program here will test their
newly acquired wings this summer
in an effort to win one of the prizes
in the $15,000 Shell Aviation compe-
tition.
The nation's three outstanding stu-
dent pilots will be selected by means
of an audit of their grades and by
a nation-wide flight competition on
or about July 15. Seven regional elim-
ination contests are to be held, after
which the seven winners will com-
pete for the three national schol-
arship awards at Washington, D.C.,
at a later date.
The winner of the national com-
petition will receive a scholarship of
$1,000 to be used for advancementj
of his education along aeronautical'
lines. Students placing second and
third will receive $750 and $500 schol-
arships respectively. More than 2,000
students from 328 colleges have in-
dicated their intention of participat-
ing.
University Curator
Travels I South'
Dr. C. L. Lundell, curator of flow-
ering plants of the University Her-
barium, left last week on a field trip
to investigate the flora of southern
Texas and the Tamulipas region of
Mexico, Dr. Edwin B. Mains, Direc-
tor of the University Herbarium an-
nounced yesterday.
For the past seven years Dr. Lun-
dell has carried on an extensive in-
vestigation of the flora in the Maya
area of Central America: On this
trip he will try to determine whether
or not the flora of this region ex-
tends up the coast of Mexico and
southern Texas.
Dr. Lundell's past research in Cen-
tral America has been a part of the
biological study of the Maya region
which has been carried on by the Car-
negie Institute of Washington in co-
operation with the University of
Michigan.

Mounted Birds
Protect College
FromDangers
A collection of mounted birds saved
Gingling College, Nanking, China,
from possible destruction by the in-
vading Japanese army.
This is the story which came out
of China in a letter of April 6, 1940,
from Mrs. MacMillin of Gingling
College to Mr. Norman A. Wood, for-
mer curator of birds of the Universi-
ty Museums.
Mr. Wood began the collection of
mounted birds at Gingling College
when he taught ornitology there in
1923.
Mrs. MacMillin stated that this
exhibit gave great service during the
days when potentially destructive
guests came repeatedly to the cam-
pus; for interest in the birds dis-
tracted their minds from the evil
that they had intended.
Since the invasion of China, the
college has been mnoved to a safer
area in the interior.

Campus Writers
Discuss Problems
At Hopwood Teas
Exchange of ideas among campus
creative writers is encouraged by the
Hopwood teas, which are given each
Thursday afternoon in the Hopwood
Room in Angell Hall by the Hopwood
Committee for students of English
composition and members of the
English department.
Students in this way also find an
opportunity to discuss their writing
problems and become acquainted with
their professors in an informal man-
ner.
Occasionally the committee honors
some person connected with the Hop-
woods as it recently had Mrs. Iola
Fuller Godspeed, last year's major
fiction award winner as gfest of hon-
or and each spring the contest win-
ners are entertained at a social hour,
The regular teas are also varied by
a Christmas party each year which
features German cakes, cookies and
lighted tapers.

.

I

British forces, based at Narvik, were reported moving southward
through Norway in a race with the Germans for control of the strategic
port of Trondheim. German columns moved northward from Oslo and
Bergen, the report said. Possession of Trondheim, western terminal of
a trans-Norwegian railroad, is of great strategic importance. Other late
developments include reported air bombardment of Hegra (A), the
mining by the British fleet of their own West coast (B), and the sinking
of a British destroyer and submarine (C) reported by Berlin ...
TNEC Analyzed; Seeks Answer
-To Present Monopoly Situation

BOWVL f f for
Speed - Rction - Thrill
7 ALLEYS ... ALL OPEN
Alleys available at all times
Learn this real man's sport NOW !
Free Instruction - See "Al"
MIHIANUNION

- =w tl

GOLFSIDE

RIDING,

Editor's note: First of a series on
current economic problems, with
special emphasis on the Temporary
National Economic Committee. Writ-
ten after consultation with members
of the economics department.
By LAURENCE MASCOTT
How to put both idle men and idle
money to work and to meet a con-
centration of economic power has
been America's great problem in the
"thirties" and is still America's great
problem in the new "forties."
One solution maintains that it is
the concentration of economic power
in the hands of a few that is pri-
marily responsible for the nation's
great problem. But not even this
group, nor any other, can accurately
indicate just how great this alleged
concentration is, what are the under-
lying causes for this concentration,
and, if this concentration is an evil,
how can the situation be ameliorated
or removed. There is the further
question, moreover, as to the extent
to which the monopoly problem bears
n the depression; but it can be con-
cluded that the concentration prob-
lem is important on its own account.
In fact, it has become evident that
at this time more than ever, an ade-
quate, complete, matter-of-fact study
of the whole American economy is
essential.
As President Roosevelt pointed out
in his April 29, 1938 message to Con-
gress: "There should be a thorough
study of the concentration of eco-
nomic power in American industry
0 =I

and the effect of that concentration'
upon the decline of competition.
There should be an examination of
the existing price system and thel
price policies of industry to determine
their effect upon the general level
of trade, upon employment, upon
long-term profits, and upon consump-
tion.

pp--

F:'...a_.: ..r....: ...arm.: r . ...r ' . ..r...: ..a' "'_..r.._' '.a,'~'_.r "_

ROYALE PRESENTS,

CASH PRIZES AND RIBBONS

lil

qLrmnJrjth.nn

Horsemanship,

C/ J~ca/ Cn ujic

Musical Chairs,

Jumping Classes
Call 2-3441 for Entries
Wed., April 23, at 8 P.M.
ADM ISSION 50c
2350 Huron River Drive

A COMPLETE RECITAL by MARION ANDERSON
1763 -A Mio Fernando
1764 - Airs De Adieux
1765 - Heav'n Heav'n
Sometimes I Feel Like a Motherless Child
Ask for Album 17-- $2.75
JAN PEERCE
1835 - At Dawning
Oh Promise Me
189 - Sylvia
Trees

I

-1

M'

Attentioii Pipesiokers!
YOU'LL "O.K." THIIS ENGINEERED PIPE

IT'S SCIENTIFICALLY DESIGNED to cool smoke between puffs
condenses and traps all irritating oils, tar and vapors . . . a

THE J -I PIP
One of four sizes will exactly "fit" your manner of sm
Ci11garette Ca
See our complete line of RONSON con
lighters-priced from $7 and up. The
RoNsof case is priced as low as $8.25. Lighter
MASTERCASE
For a limited time only we are offering a limited supply of
'Collectors' Oddities at $1.00.
We carry the most complete stock of pipes in town. Come in
today and shop around -
G.B.D.'s at $5 and $6. Dunhill at $10, City Deluxe $3.50
Bryson $3.50

oking. $10. to $17.50
nbination cases and
RONSON Master
s $2.95 and up.

ANITA LOUISE - Harpist
1859 - Chanson Sans Paroles
Star Dust
HAMILTON COLLEGE CHOIR
1864- Ave Maria
Introit - From "Mass for Men's Voices"
Sanctus Franz Schubert
pop u la r tcc
ROYALE
-1795 -W-hose T heme Song? Richard Himber
1836 -Out of Nowhere
Body and Soul Johnny Green
1858 -Zigeuner
Lover Come Back To Me Johnny Green
VARSITY
8238 -Polka Dots and Moonbeams
Little Curly Hair in a High Chair Johnny Messner
8202 - Wham
Love For Sale jack Teagarden
8231 - Carnival of Venice
Hodge Podge Harry James
Not to mention VAN ALEXANDER, SONNY DUNHAM, JESS STACY, JAN GARBER,
, PHIL HARRIS, GEORGIE AULD, WILL OSBORNE and TOMMY TUCKER.
VISIT OUR PRIVATE BOOTHS to hear these and all other records.
ROYALE RECORDS 75e . . . . VARSITY RECORDS 35c

r"'

1-i
L-

-. U

11

C

F
F

IN TOBACCOS we are featuring Rum and Maple at 15c,
25c, $i.10 and $2.10-- Heine's at 95c and $1.85 - Han-
some Dan at $1 and $2 --and Walnut at $1.10 and $2.15.

r

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan