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April 19, 1940 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1940-04-19

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

TTTE MICHIGAN DAIILY

Scholar and religious leader, Dr.
Abram Leon Sachar, national Hillel'
director, will speak on "Sufferance
is the Badge" at 8 p.m. today at the
Hillel Foundation following the regu-
lar Friday night Conservative Serv-
ices.
Dr. Sachar, former professor of his-
tory at the University of Illinois, will
also speak at 12:30 p.m. today at a
banquet given in his honor by mem-
bers of the old and new Hillel Coun-
cils and members of the faculty and
will conduct an open forum discus-
sion at 1 p.m. tomorrow at Zeta Beta
Tau fraternity.
An address on "Democracy and
Social Pluralism," sponsored by the
Foundation, will be presented by Dr.
Jacob J. Weinstein, Rabbi of Temple
K.A.M. in Chicago, at 8 p.m. Sunday
in the League.
Dr. Weinstein was founder of the
Hillel Foundation at the University
of Texas and served as director there
for a number of years.

Ionday To Be
New Deadline
For Essayists
Deadline for the submission of en-
tries ,in the Engineering Honor Sys-
tem essay contest has been extend-
ed from 4 p.m. today to.4 p.m. Mon-
day, Art Brandt, '40E, chairman of
the Honor Committee of the Engin-
eering Council, sponsors of the con-
test announced last night.
The additional time has been grant-
ed, Brandt explained, to enable stu-
dents who have not yet completed
their entries to finish their papers
over the weekend.
Additional prizes, consisting of two
tickets to the All-Engineering Ban-
quet, will be awarded for honorable
mention, Brandt revealed. First and
second prizes, a radio and an electric
clock, are on display in the Instru-
ment Case on the Fourth Floor of
the West Engineering Building above
the Arch.
Limited to the subject "My Inter-
pretation of the Honor System," the
contest is open to all engineers.
Essays submitted must be typed and
double spaced on one side of the
paper only, with a preferable length
of 500 to 700 words.
Scandinavian Club
Will Visit Detroit
Howard Almdale, '42, president of
the Scandinavian Club, has urged all
members to make reservations with
him before noon tomorrow for the
organization's trip to Detroit.
The club will meet at the Engin-
eering Arch 5:30 p.m. tomorrow and
leave for the Stockholm Restaurant
in Detroit.
Plans for the joint meeting to be
held with the Suomri Club, organi-
zation for Finnish students, will be
discussed at the Stockholm.

38 Engineers,
Are Assured
Electrical Jobs

Prof.
One
End

A. D. Moore Sees
Call Per Senior By
Of This Semester

Although almost two months of
school are yet to come, Prof. A. D.
Moore, who is in charge of place-
ment for the electrical engineering
department, announced this week
that already twenty percent of the
graduating electrical engineers are
assured positions in industry upon
graduation.
To date 38 calls have come for
seniors from firms representing a
cross section of American industry
in the East and Middle West. In
addition to this encouraging report
on seniors, 32 calls have been made
for students already out of the Uni-
versity; however, the number of
available graduates is so low that
only a small number of the calls
could be filled.
Previous years have shown that
the coming two months generally
bring a marked acceleration in the
job-finding rate, - and Professor
Moore estimates that by June the
average will be well over one call
per senior.
The figures already given do not
include those from Civil Service and
numerous assistantships in colleges
and universities, which would, at a
conservative estimate, bring the av-
erage up to over one call per senior.
Dr. Bruce Will Speak
Dr. James D. Bruce, chairman o,
the Department of Postgraduate
Medicine in the School of Medicine
and chairman of the University's
Division of Health Sciences, will
speak April 17 on an as yet unan-
nounced subject.

Student Loan
Fund Offered
Galens Newsstand To Aid
Needy Medical Students
A loan fund to be available to
students in the Medical School will
be established by Galens, Honorary
Medical Society, Robert Plumb, '40M,
president of Galens, announced yes-
terday.
Money for this fund, which is to
be established by grants of $800 a
year for six years, will come from the
income of the Galens News Stand,
situated in the lobby of the Univer-
sity Hospital.
The Dean of the Medical School is
to be in charge of all loans. Any full
time, needy medical student is eligible
to receive a loan. No loan is to ex-
ceed $100 per person per year, at
1 per cent interest per year. Loans
must be paid back to the Fund with-
in a period of five years after the stu-
dent leaves Medical School.
Repayment of all loans will be reg-
ulated by the Dean of the Medical
School.

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ion, they will present current tion, Dean Edward Kraus of the
on teaching problems. literary college, Dr. G. E. Carrothers,
club will also attend the an- Dr. Willard Olson, and Dr. Irving
honors convocation following H. Anderson of the School of Edu-
speeches. For the afternoon cation.
ns the convention will divide Dr. Charles A. Sink of the School
wenty-one conferences featur- of Music will be the chairman of the
>ecial programs led by various Music conference meeting in con-
educators. nection with the Michigan School
Jon M. Trytten of the Univer- Band and .Vocal Associations,. to
ligh $chool will act as chair- witness a choral band and orchestra
for the Administrative Teachers clinic and festival.
rence while Dean James B. An evaluation of secondary educa
nson of the School of Educa- tion will be made at the Education
vill direct the eleventh annual Conference from the viewpoint of
ence on teacher education an educator, a parent,'a college ad-
z will consider new concepts ministrator and 'a psychologist. At
man development. Participat- the Conference of Deans and Advis-
1 this same group of lectures ors of Women Miss Thyrsa W. Amos
lso be Dr. Eugene B. Elliot, of the University of Pittsburgh will
rintendent of Public Instruc- speak.
CLEAR. PURE. REFRESHING I

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IR'hEcrrOY

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WANTED-TO BUY-4

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BEN THE TAILOR-More money for
your clothes. Open evenings.
122 E. Washington. 329
HIGHEST CASH PRICES paid for
your discarded wearing apparel.
Claude Brown, 512 S. Main Street.
146
ANY OLD CLOTHING-Pay $5.00 to
$500. Suits, Overcoats, furs, minks,
Persian lambs, diamonds, type-
writers and cash for old gold.
Phone Sam-6304. Sunday ap-
pointments preferred. 359
TRANSPORTATION -21

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THE PRLMfl BECH

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