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April 16, 1940 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1940-04-16

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

i~r, eirnin~ it~ i~i;u 'Ri~ MT [Y

ajor League Baseball Clubs Open Pennant Races

11

Tigers, Browns To Play
Before Largest Crowd'
Injured Knee Benches Yank's DiMaggio;
Feller To Hurl Against White Sox
NEW YORK, April 15.--(A)-Though the girders in many a grand-
stand still are festooned with icicles and a cold wind howls across the
land, another JBig League baseball campaign is scheduled to start tomorrow.
The weather forecasters are fairly optimistic, pending last-minute
returns. In five of the eight cities the tentative guess is for "fair" wea-
ther tomorrow, with St. Louis, Washington and Philadelphia on the doubt-
ful side. All are threatened with rain.
The New York Yankees, favorites.

.,

to win their fifth straight American'
League flag at the unprecedented
odds of 7-to-20, tee off against the
Athletics at Philadelphia, with the
florid Rufus Ruffing likely facing
Chubby Dean on the hill.
Joe DiMaggio, the greatest of all
the Yanks, will not play in the in-
augural, as he slightly injured a knee
n yesterday's exhibition at Brook-
lyn. Joe, incidentally, has played
in only one opener in four seasons
with the champions. Fifteen thou-
sand is the estimated attendance;
possibly an optimistic one.
The prize crowd of the day, 40,000,
iq expected to witness the opener at
Detroit, in which big Buck Newsom
of the Tigers is billed to face George
Coffman of the St. Louis Browns.
Detroit fans probably are anxious,
to see how Hank Greenberg looks
romping around the outfield.
. Boston's Red Sox, who have been
chosen by a small band of enthu-
siasts to beat the Yankees this time--
and who might make it interesting
for the Bombers, at that, if their
pitching is passable--start against
an improved Washington club in
the Capital. Lefty Grove, 40 years
old and the only 15-game winner
on the Boston staff last year, likely
will oppose Dutch Leonard, the
k5nuckle-baller who won 20 for the
Senators. Estimated ';attendance,
31,000.
Cleveland, popular choice to place
third again in the American League
race, faces the Chicago White Sox
before an anticipated crowd of 30,000
at' Comiskey Park. Bob Feller, the
21-year-old fireballer whom Oscar

Vitt regards as a potential 30-game
winner, goes against Edgar Smith
of the Sox.
The big noise in the National
League is billed at Cincinnati, where
Paul Derringer, hard luck hero of
the last World Series, goes to the
hill against Bill Lee of the Chicago
Cubs. The capacity of Crosley Field,
35,000, has long been sold, out.
St. Louis, equal choice with the
Reds at 11-to-5 to win ,he pennant,
opens at home agains the Pittsburgh
Pirates. It will be something of a
homecoming for Frankie Frisch,
new manager of the Pirates. Curt
Davis, the Cards' big winner last
year, is billed to face Bob Klinger
of the Pirates before a crowd of
around 18,000.
Carl Hubbell, who looks like he:
might have a brilliant comeback in!
his system, is Manager Bill Terery's
nominee in the Giants-Phillies open-
er at the Polo Grounds. Kirby Higbe
will go for the Phils. Hubbell has
looked like his old selef this spring,
and that alone should be sufficientI
to pull a crowd of 35,000 to the met-
ropolitan opening.
Brooklyn, facing the Bees at Bos-
ton, should be afforded a quick idea
of its chances of finishing as high
as third again. Manager Leo Duro-
cher has selected his big "if" pitcher,
Whitlow Wyatt; of the game knee,
to face the Beees. If Wyatt looks
good, and is not bunted out of the
park, then the Dodgers will have
to be taken pretty seriously. Bill
Posedel is. Wyatt's probable oppo-
nent, with the expected crowd a
scanty 10,000, all chilled to the bone.

Linksmen Win
In Dual Match
WithBuckeyes
Capt. Palmer Takes Three
Points To Lead Squad
To 141/201/2 Victory
(Special to the Daily)
COLUMBUS, April 15-Michigan's
golf team topped off its successful
Southern , trip here today with a
1412-9 % victory over Ohio State.
This gave the Wolverines their
fourth straight win in as many
starts.
Coach Courtright's all-veteran
team had little trouble With the
Buckeyes, and lost only one best-
ball and one singles match.
Captain Bob Palmer, who paced
the Michigan team in its three dual
meets in the South, and then cli-
maxed his performances by finish-
ing second in a field of 90 in the
Southern Intercollegiate Champion-
ships, extended his successful rec-
ord by taking all three points from
his opponent, Charles Evans.
After tying Simione, 11/-11/2 in
a morning match, Lynn Riess went
out in the afternoon and captured
three points from Bartschy.
Jack Emery took 2%/2 points from
Gilbert in his match. Simione
couldn't better his morning perfor-
mance and chalked up his second
tie of the day, against Bill Black.
Tom Tussing was the only Michigan
player to be defeated, falling before
Bellino's play, 2-1.
In the best-ball matches in the
morning, Palmer and Emery tied
with Gilbert and Stackle, while
Black- and Tussing were downed by
Evans and Bartschy, 2/2-%1/2.
Michigan's reserve team beat the
Buckeye second-stringers 111/2-61/.
Leidy and Johnson of Michigan tied
Montanero and Murray, while Osler
and Clark beat the Buckeye duo of
Horstman and Gardner, 21/2-/2.
John Leidy beat Murray in the
singles, 21/2-12. Ken Johnson de-
feated Montanero, 21-1/2 while Dave
Osler chalked up two more points
for the Wolverines with a 2-1 deci-
sion over Horstman.-

Holman .........:
Trosko . ....
Harms .....,.....
Dobson...........
Pink............
Chamberlain.....
Evashevski
Ruehle ...........
Barry ............
Sofiak..........
Nelson ...........
Bond .............
Greenberg.......

......... 8
15
3
19
........179
.17,
~7
13
~5
17
.. 6
.. 2
.. 2

AB
Veigel .................... 1
Stoddard..........2
Steppon.................17

0
0
8
3
5
5
1
3
5
3
4
0
5
0
0
0

1
3
5
3
1
6
5
2
3
1
3
0
0
0

Totals:..
Barry .

INDVIDATI BASEBALL PLAYING RECORDS

............. 143
PITCHING
2 15

42 41 6
RECORDS
18 15

2b
0
0
2
0
2
0
0
0
1
0
1
0
0
0
0
0

Bond ........... 2
Dobson...............2
Stoddard..............2
veigel................2

8 2/3
6 1/3
3 2/3
1

13 14
13 9
3 2
2 2

Tank Team Is First To Annex
Two Major Titles In One Year

I t

Michigan's four point victory over
the Chicago Towers Club in the Na-
tional AAU swimming championships
at the New York AC last week gave
the invincible Wolverines the dis-
tinction of being the first team in the
history of natatorial competition to
march off with both of the nation's
major crowns in the same campaign.
In the past, collegiate squads had
succeeded in placing only one team,
Ohio State's Buckeyes, at the top
position in the annual amateur
meets, and it was there that the Mike
Peppe squad finished twice.
Just as the final freestyle relay
race told the story in the New Haven
meet, it was the closing medley relay
test that brought victory to the Mich-
igah squad in New York.
Princeton's crack outfit made up
of Al Vande Weghe, Dick Hough and
Ned Parke crashed through to win,
Michigan's top ranking trio, Fran-
cis Heydt and the two Sharemets,
finished just six precious inches a-
head of Chicago with the second
Wolverine team, Bill Beebe, John

Haigh and Charley Barker, in fourth.
Michigan's success in the East was
not without its disappointments,
however. Just when Gus Sharemet
seemed to have the sprinting world
at his feet, he dropped a decision to
Jaretz, the Lane Tech youthful star,
in the National AAU century clash.
Having breezed by the stiffest com-
petition everytime he had entered the
water in the Eastern invasion, the
powerful Wolverine sophomore fin-
ally buckled up in his final big test.
At the 50-yard marker, Sharemet
was six feet behind the pace setting
Walt Tomski, Michigan's ace speed-
ster just a year ago with a mediocre
:25.3 timing.
Jaretz who had played second
fiddle during the early part of the
race, came flashing into the lead in
the final lap to whip Sharemet by
three feet in :52.3 with Barker in
third and the fading Tomski fifth
and last.
Another disappointment in the
AAU's was the third place efforts of
freshman Jim Skinner.

L:

h I

Pens - Typewriters - Supplies
Writers Trade With Rider's"
RI DER'S.
302 South State St.

IN THIS CO
By MEL FiNEBERG

'RNER
11 1. 11

i

s

I

'Dixieland Doings,

I

I

five errors. The Dukes were a
classy and speedy bunch and
were out in front all the way.
Barry's twirling was not spec ,
tacular but, in spite of his own
fielding neglects, was adequate.
George Harms, a clever back-
stop, had two for two and Char-
lie Pink collected a couple.
But brighter things were ahead.
V. M. I. and Washington & Lee were
next on the list and appeared to be
ready for the Wolverine claws. But
alas, 'twas not to be. The rains came
and. both games were lost beyond
recall. .
* *
But time marches on and so
did Michigan,-to Navy. Here
the skies brightened and a new
world, one in which victory was
present, was opened to the itin-
erant ball club. Barry fired his
heaviest ammunition at the
Middies and for five and two-
thirds innings they listed badly
to port with no hits. Then a
lad named Thompson, given
name unknown so we'll call him
Ensign, topped a curve ball down
the third base line and scamper-
ing in the opposite direction,
beat it out-the hit, not a jazz
tune. This disheartened Mr.
Barry and in the next inning
Navy guns boomed out two runs
on three hits, one of them a
homer.
Mickey Stoddard came in in the
eighth and limited the opposition
to one hit as he struck out three.
Biggest surprise came when he col-
lected a bingle himself.
Unfortunately Virginia was
the next stop. The Wolverines
stepped off to a 10-2 lead in the
second inning and were so over-
come they tried to coast in. The
snow wasn't to come until the
next day and the effort was a
failure. The Cavaliers pecked
at Bond for seven innings and
pulled up to within one run
and then scored twice in the
ninth on three hits off Dobson
to win. Pink, Chamberlain and
George Ruehle led the hitters.
VARSITY SWIMMING TEAM
Members of the Varsity swim-
ming team are reauested to meet

Editorially speaking, the team
looks like a good bet . . It lacks
pitching strength, but Barry, Dob-
son and possibly Stoddard should
hold the team together ... Chamber-
lain, a sophomore at third base,
lacks experience but shows possibil-
ities both at the plate and in the
field ... Mike Sofiak, unfortunately,
has a sore arm but can cover its
inadequacy by playing in closer ..
Some balls may go past him but his
nine throwing errors on the trip
must force him to chance it . . . At
second base Steppon is the most
finished product in the infield. . . He
can hit and cover his position . . .
In the outfield there is little
to worry about.. . Trosko, Pink
and Holman can cover the ram-
parts they watch as well as any
other trio in the league and they
can take care of themselves at
the plate .. . Davey Nelson can
step in against left-handed
pitching in place of Holman and
make up in hitting power what
little he lacks in fielding . . .
Harms appears to have ousted
Evashevski at backstop ... The
little Detroiter lets nothing get
past him, his arm is fair and
his hitting is adequate.
All in all, if the team rids itself
of the handicap of having had too
little work outdoors and gets by
Wisconsin this weekend, it should
be in the first division.
I_

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