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April 05, 1940 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1940-04-05

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

__ THE MIIICHTGAN iXII Y

Prof. Bagley,
Teaches Here,
This Summer
Education Leader To Give
Lectures On Modern
Theory AndTechnique
Outstanding among the visiting
members of the summer session fa-
culty of the School of Education is
Professor-Emeritus William C. Bag-
ley of Columbia University who re-
turns to Michigan to lecture on the
theories and techniques of teaching.
Professor Bagley began his ca-
reer in a one - teacher village
school in the Upper Peninsula after
his graduation from Michigan State
College in 1895. After ten years of
public and normal school teaching
he became professor of education
at the University of Illinois and
later at Columbia.
Prominent as a writer, Professor
Bagley became the first editor of
"The Journal of National Edu-
cation" and is now the editor of
"School and Society." In the fields
of teacher education and special
curriculum study his books have at-
tained international repute. "Edu-
cation, Crime, and Social Progress,"
'A Century of the University School,",
and "Determinism in Education" are
some of his notable texts.
Professor Bagley will conduct a
course in the "Critical Analysis of
Theories and Techniques of Teach-
ing" and also participate in the pro-
gram of the Secondary Curriculum
Workshop.
German Teachers
To Convene Here
Second annual meeting of the
lMchigan Chapter of the American
Association of Teachers of German
will be held in connection with the
meeting of the Schoolmaster's Club
here on Friday, April 26, at the
Union, Prof. Henry W. Nordmeyer of
the German department announced.
yesterday.
Agenda includes a talk by Miss
Hilda Horny on the use of phono-
graph records in German elementary
instruction, a business meeting, and
election of officers.
The Chapter was founded here last
April as a part of the national or-
ganization which comprises 19 other
chapter4 from coast to coast. Its
purpose is to promote a professional
attitude among teachers of German.
It also publishes the German Quar-
terly.

s
,

Title Of First To Use Slide Rule
At Michigan Claimed By Alumnus

Elbert
Was
Mates

Cf

Nicholson's
target Of
Kept Old

'Toy'
Scorn;
Way

Gazing reminiscently at the fes-
tivity centered about the Mammoth
slide rule at the engineers' annual
ball Friday night in the Union was
the man who first introduced that
calculator's ancestral counterpart to
the Michigan campus 46 years ago.
It was in 1894 that Elbert Nichol-
son, '93, first amazed neophyte en-
gineers with the rapid calculations
possible with his novel "gadget," a
"gadget" which was destined to be-
come not only an indispensable part
of every engineer's equipment, but
also was soon recognized as the sym-I
bol and trademark of the engineer.
After completing three years of
work in the division of mechanical
engineering, at that time still part
of the literary college, Mr. Nichol-
son took a two year respite from
books and theory between his junior
and senior years in the University to
gain practical experience under
George S. Pierson, a Kalamazoo en-
gineer.
It was while in the employ of Pier-
son that he had his first experienceI
in using a slide rule. So pleased
was he with the efficiency of this
new tool that he took one back to
school when he returned for his final
year of work in 1894.
First reaction to Nicholson's "toy"
registered by his classmates was a
mingled feeling of scorn and skep-
ticism. Interested in its workings,
they nevertheless held little faith in
its accuracy, and continued using
the traditional long-hand methods
of calculating.
Working as they were at that time,
twelve together in the mechanical
engineering laboratory in what is
now the Engineering Annex, these
students were not long in noticing
that their co-worker, Nicholson, was
consistently faster than they in com-
pleting the numerical calculations,
yet he was getting results which
were consistently accurate. It was
not many class meetings, therefore,
before they realized the inadequacy
of long-hand calculations, and Ni-
cholson became the unofficial cal-
culator for the entire class.
Those ancient "slip sticks" were
nothing like the present highly spe-
cialized and developed models, Mr.

Nicholson reminisced, calling back
memories from those early days of
engineering on the Michigan cam-
pus. There was not much variety
in the slide rule line in those days.
there was but one model on the
market, and not a very good one at
that, but it was better than tedious
pencil calculations.
In place of the twelve-odd scales
available on slide rules today, these
original models carried but four.
The principle resemblance to models
now in prominence in any engineer's
office was the standard 10-inch
length.
Those old slide rules, in spite of
their many inferiorities, Mr. Nichol-
son chuckled, served as an excellent
barometer to weather conditions. If
the humidity was high, the wood
swelled, and the slide had to be
manipulated with might and main.
In dry weather, the situation was
reversed, and the slide had a strong
tendency to slip out of its slot.
A resident of Sturgis, Mich. where
he is still actively engaged in the
engineering line, the 72-year-olds
Michigan alumnus is in Ann Arbor
to aid Dean Mortimer E. Cooley in
compiling records of early engineers
in the state. One of the founders
of Michigan Engineering Society
publication, he is now searching the
volumes of that magazine to gather
information concerning Francis
Hodgman, prominent engineer and
alumnus.

Ann Arbor
Here Is Today's News
In Summary
Those University students who are
worrying about the census man may
set their minds at ease. All students
with the exception of foreign stu-
dents and those who claim Ann Arbor
as their place of residence will be
enumerated in their home towns, ac-
cording to Harold Olson, census enu-
merator.
Full public cooperation to the
dog quarantine which has been
in effect since April 1 is urged
by Police Chief Norman E. Cook
and Sheriff Jacob B3. Andres.
Both pointed out that the quar-
antine is for the public benefit
and that, without the public's
obedience to it, it will be thor-
oughly ineffective insofar as nei-
ther department has sufficient
men nor equipment to track
down and impound all the stray
dogs,. Both individual owners
and fraterniti4s and sororities are
urged to comply with the quar-
antine.
Those men in the engineering
school who are studying automo-
tive engineering might feel a bit jeal-
ous at the works of one Robert Line-
baugh, a fifteen year old student at
Slauson Junior High, who has fin-
ished another lap on his highway
of automotive industry.
Robert has just completed his first
metal "streamlined" model car.

FacultyPapers
Professors Of University
Attend MathMeeting
Several members of the mathema-
tics department will present papers
at the meeting of the American
Mathematical Society April 12 and 13
in Chicago. Prof. Thoephil Hilde-
brandt. head of the mathematics
department, announced yesterday.
Dr. R. C. F. Bartels and Prof.
R. V. Churchill will present an ex-
tension of Duhamel's theory; "Term-
wise integration of Sturm-Liouville
expansions" also will be considered
by Professor Churchill. An exposi-
tion "On partially ordered sets" will
be given by Professors Ben Dushnik
and E. W. Miller. Dr. H. H. Gold-
stine will deliver a discourse on
"Linear functionals and integrals in
abstract spaces." Dr. R. M. Thrall
will submit a paper on the subject,
"A note on a theorem by Witt."
Prof. W. L. Ayres, associate secre-
tary of the Society, is acting as gen-
eral secretary of this meeting.
Featured at Mathematics Society
meeting will- be discussions on both
theoretical and applied mathema-
tics.

MICHIGAN

Willie lloppe, sensational New York cue star, clinched the world'
three-cushion billiards title in Chicago with his 16th consecutive victor
in-the tournament. liere he is shown executing a difficult jump shot
In the deciding ap,me he defeated Welker Cochran, of San Fr'ancisco
50 to 43 in 46 innings.

Quarterdeck Society Initiates
Ten In Annual Mock Sea Battle

Ten students went thro& hell
and highwater this week in order to
become members of Quarterdeck, hon-
orary fraternity for students of naval
architecture and marine engineering.
Among those who had to, stage a
mock sea battle in front of the Li-
brary, to swim the length of thenaval
tank under water and to rform
other dire deeds were the fallowing:
Joseph Andries, '41E, Edgar Beau-
champ-Nobbs, '40E, Emerson ,Blair,
'40E, Samuel Heller, Jr., '40EArthur
Low, '41E, Warren McElroy, '41E,
Arthur Oakes, '40E, Nathan Reaume,
'41E, Ralph Turner, '41E, and Her-
man Ulbrich, '41E.
Quarterdeck Society, one 7f the
oldest departmental societies on cam-

pus, was organized in 1905 as the
"Indoor Yacht Club," so called be-
cause the six members started the
naval testing tank in operation and
made the first yacht model.
The six members planned at first
to meet once or twice a month in or-
der to read technical papers and
carry on a discussion of their work,
but after a few such meetings the
indoor yachtsmen limited the pro-
grams to hamburgers "with," lots of
beer and inharmonious barbershop
singing. That, at least, is the story
told by Mr. H. G. Crosby, '06, one of
the charter members, in a letter re-
cently to Prof. E. N. Bragg, head of
the Department of Naval Architec-
ture and Marine Engineering.

DAILY OFFICIAL
BULLETIN

ENTERPRISE.
One of the Marksof
a Good Newspaper
WITH characteristic enterprise
the St. Louis Post-Dispatch
recently sent a staff writer to Mexico to
interview Leon Trotsky, exiled Russian
revolutionary leader, about the present
state of world affairs and possible future
developments.
This important, exclusive interview ap-
peared in a series of three articles on con-
secutive Sundays in the Post-Dispatch.
Recognizing the significance of the inter-
view, a dozen leading metropolitan news-
papers--arranged for publication rights in
their cities.
Many professors of journalism who use the
Post-Dispatch as text material in their
classrooms will cite the Trotsky. interview
as a typical example of Post-Dispatch en-
terprise, worthy of a newspaper that is
recogpized as one of the outstanding liberal
journals of America.
In accordance with an arrangement that has been in effect
for the past seven years, subscriptjons for the Post-Dispatch
may be placed with Mr. Wesley H. Maurer, Department of.
Journalism. This arrangement is for the convenience of
faculty members and students and is without personal profit
to Ms. Maurer.

RONALD COLMAN
"LIGHT THAT FAILED"
Here's Wishing You a
Most Enjoyable Vocation
When you get back, The
Michigan will have ready
for you
"ABE LINCOLN
IN ILLINOIS"
and
"TOO MANY
HUSBANDS'
Stage Bands Now Boo
GEO. HALL
with DOLLY DAWN
DEL COURTNEY'S
tANDD CAMERA MUSIC
with
EDDIE PEABODY

--

CHURCH
DIRECTORY

HILLEL FOUNDATION
East University at Oakland. Dial 3779.
Dr. Isaac Rabinowitz, Director.
The Hillel Foundation wishes all of you a very
happy vacation.

-I

FIRST METHODIST CHURCH
State and Washington Streets.
Charles W. Brashares, Minister.
Choir fDirector, Hardin Van Deursen.
Organist, Mary Porter.
10:40 A.M. Morning Worship. Dr. Brashares'
subiect will be "The Census."
6:30- PTM. Wesleyan Guild Supper. Fellowship
hour afterward.

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II

ST. ANDREWS EPISCOPAL CHURCH
Catherine at Division Street.
Rev. Henry Lewis, Rector.
Rev. Frederick W. Leech, Assistant Minister,
8:00 AM. Holy Communion.
11:00 A.M. Holy Communion and Sermon by
Rev. Henry Lewis.
11:00 A.M. Junior Church.
11:00 A.M. Kindergarten in Harris Hall.
7:00 P.M. Student Open House.
BETHLEHEM EVANGELICAL CHURCH
Theodore Schmale, Pastor.
432 South Fourth Avenue. Dial 8498.
9:30 A.M. Church School.
10:30 A.M. Morning Worship. Sermon topic:
"The Key to Christian Truth."
No student meeting.
FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
Corner of 512 East Huron.
Rev. C. H. Loucks, Minister.
Mr. Walter Kimble, Minister of Music.
9:30 A.M. Church School.
10:45 A.M. Morning Worship. Sermon topic:
"The challenge of the Church."

FIRST CHURCH OF CHRIST, SCIENTIST
409 South Division Street
Sunday, 10:30 A.M. Services.
11:45 A.M. Sunday School.
Wednesday, 7:30 P.M. Wednesday Evening Meet-
ing.
FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
1432 Washtenaw Avenue. Dial 2-4466.
William P. Lemon, D.D., Minister.
Lillian Dilts, Assistant.
William N. Barnard, Director of Music.
9:30 AM. Church School. Classes for all age
groups.
10:45 A.M. Morning Worship Service. "The Pa-
tient Years" will be the subject of the sermon
by Dr. W. P. Lemon.
FIRST CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH
State and William Streets.
Leonard A. Parr, D.D., Minister.
Director -of Music, Donn Chown.
Organist, Mrs. Mary McCall Stubbins.

FRIDAY, APRIL 5, 1940
VOL. L. No. 137
Notices
President and. Mrs. Ruthven will
be at home to members of the facul-
ty and other townspeople on Sun-
day, April 7, from 4 to 6 o'clock.
To the Members of the University
Couneil: University Council will meet
on April 15 at 4:15 p.m., in Room
1009 Angell Hall. The agenda in-
cludes the consideration of a Uni-
versity Planning Committee and a
communication from the College of
Literature, Science and the Arts rela-
tive to a study of faculty services.
Louis A Hopkins, Secretary.

HENRY BUSSE

LITTLE JACK
LITTLE

"

Freshmen, College of Literature,
(Continued on Page 4)

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