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March 29, 1940 - Image 2

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The Michigan Daily, 1940-03-29

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PA(;z T1tVt 'o. ..,. .

THDE MRHJ IAN DAILY

FRWAY, MARCTI 29, 1940

PAGR TWO- ~ FRIDAY, MARC!! 29, 1940

Bridge. Games
Will Highlight
Union's Week
Prof. Howard Ehrmann
To Lecture On Finland
At Sunday'sProgram
Plan Hiking Group
New high in crowded Union pro-
grams will be reached this weekend
with a long list of events planned by
the students executive staff.
The "He-She" bridge tournament
will give the fighting sexes a chance
to settle it over the card tables at
2 p.m. Saturday. Under the direc-
tion of Harold Singer, '41, of the ex-
ecutive staff, notable interest has
been aroused in bridge contests this
year through all-men's and faculty-
student affairs.
First Mixed Tournament
This will be the first mixed
tournament sponsored by the Union,
which M4lans to arrange similar events
if this one proves successful. En-
tries are advised to register in the
student offices before the contest
opens; a 10 cent fee per person will
be charged.
Conducted by the Union "To fill
that Sunday afternoon gap in the
week's entertainment" are the Sunday
afternoon programs, presented weekly
at 2:30 p.m. in the Union's small ball-
room. Postponed because of Easte:,
week, the programs will be resumed
this weekend with a talk by Prof.
Howard Ehrmann of the history de-
partment. After his speech on "Fin-
land and Its Problems," movies will
be shown.
Hiking Group Planned
Advance plans for a proposed Sun-
day morning hiking group were an-
nounced by Harold Singer. These
walks will be conducted by University
men who will give informal discus-
sions on various topics. The first of
the series will be led by Mr. James
Calver of the geology department,
shortly after Spring Vacation.

Efficiency And Simplicity Make Throws Hat In
New Dental Institute Ideal Unit v

Ring

E'vidence Shows Moon Was One
Fused To Earth, Rufus Says
Theory Originates From Glass Objects Found On Shore
Of Pacific; Rupture Occurred 10,06f0 Years Ago

Ann Arbor

'

Here Is Today's

News

Kellogg Foundation First To Devote Entire Building
To Study Of Graduate And Postgraduate Dentistry

By RICHARD HARMEL
With the fanfare and ceremony so
characteristic of dedications coming
April 3 for the new W. K. Kellogg;
Foundation Institute for Graduate
and Postgraduate Dentistry, the cam-
pus is slowly awakening to a curiosity
about the location and function of the
building whose sleek, modern lines,
dental authorities say, suggest the
spirit of progress and research in
which it was founded.
The Institute, completed except for
the landscaping around it, rises at the
corner of North UJniversity Avenue
and Twelfth Street directly across
from the League and next to the new
Health Service.
It represents a unique institution
in that no other school or organiza-
tion in the country has an entire
building devoted to a study of gradu-
ate and postgraduate dentistry.
outstanding Contribution To Campus
Architecturally speaking, the build-
ing represents "an outstanding con-
tribution" to the University campus,
according to Dr. Russel W. Bunting,
dean of the dental school. He says:
"In the 'Institute is combined maxi-
mum utilitarian efficiency with sim-
plicity and beauty of designthat
makes it an ideal educational unit."
From the outside, the Institute is
three stories in height and extends
200 feet north and south and is ap-
proximately 100 feet deep. The en-
tire exterior is punctured by large
windows providing the maximum of
daylight to all the rooms. The in-
clusion of a court 50 by 54 feet in
size between the Institute and the
dental building makes possible the
same lighting for the inner rooms as
is available on the outside.
Entrance Faces West
The main entrance of the building
faces west. After ascending two short
flights of steps, the main lobby, pan-
eled in walnut, is reached. From
here, a marble stairway, divided by a
large panel of glass brick, ascends
to the second floor and lateral stair-
ways lead to the basement.
The first floor has to the right of
the foyer, the administrative offices
of the W. K. Kellogg Foundation In-
stitute, a faculty conference room
and a seminar room. On the east
and west corridor leading to the den-
tal building are the dental caries
(cavities) research laboratories, a
small lecture room and a seminar
room. To the left, a wide arch opens
directly into a children's waiting room
which leads into clinics and labora-,
tories for the teaching of children's
dentistry and orthodontics.
The second floor has the central

west side of the building devoted to
clinics and laboratories for partial
denture prosthesis and across the hall
are additional laboratories. On the
north side are special facilities for
teaching operative dentistry, root sur-
gery and ceramics. The entire south
side is devoted to the operating rooms
and private consultation offices of
oral surgery.
Seminar Rooms In Basement
On the basement floor are semi-
nar rooms, laboratories for oral path-
ology and research, an auditorium
with a capacity of 300, locker rooms,
lounge room and an exhibition room.
Direct communication between the
Institute and the dental building is
assured by means of continuous halls
on the south side and by direct open-
ings on the northwest corner of the
dental building.
The Institute will not be used for
undergraduate study expept in oral
pathology. All undergraduate teach-
ing will continue to go on in the
dental building while the Institute
will confine itself to instruction for'
graduate and postgraduate work.

By PAUL CHANDLERt
Thousands of small glassy objects
strewn on the southwestern shores of
the Pacific Ocean are important evi-
dence that the moon once was a part
of the earth until torn away by a
powerful tidal force, according to a
theory advanced here today by Prof.
Carl W. Rufus, of the astronomy de-
partment.
The glass objects-known to physi-
cal scientists as "tektites"-have
been studied for more than 150 years,
but there never has been a satisfac-
tory theory for their origin.
Dr. Rufus' explanation of the phe-
nomena is based largely upon a gen-
eral "fission theory" of the origin of
the moon, which was developed by
Sir George H. Darwin, and which says
that the Pacific Ocean is a scar on the
earth created when the moon tore
away 10,000 years ago.
Professor Rufus says that some of
the loose matter which was pulled
away with the moon did not fall im-
mediately back to earth, but contin-
ued to revolve out in space for some
time. These particles, ,Professor Ru-
fus believes, were similar in composi-
tion to the matter which is contained
in the rings encircling Saturn today.
According to his theory, these par-
ticles which revolved about the earth
were the glassy objects which are
found in the Pacific area today and

which science 'ha labeled "tektites."
The composition of the primitive
earth at the tind of the moon's fis-;
sion is not known today, but it is gen-
erally thought that the rupture oc-
curred while the earth was beginning
to solidify. According to Professor
Rufus' explanation, the earth was+
made up on an upper layer of hard
granite, with a lower layer of glassy
basalt beneath the granite.
"When the fission occurred," he
explains, "it seems very probable that
the mass of the moon stripped the
Pacific area of its granite layer and
probably lifted some of the material
from the glassy layer. The glassy
part, being deepest, was the last to
leave the earth and would therefore
constitute the material which formed
the detached' fragments."
These particles revolved around the
earth over the Pacific and were fin-
ally drawn into the atmosphere with
"speeds sufficient to produce the typi-
cal forms which are characteristic of
tektites today," Professor Rufus add-
ed.
Another bit of evidence which
seems to add to the authenticity of
this theory is the existence of a series
of deep trenches on the floor of the
Pacific Ocean, parallel to the area
in which the tektites are found. These
trenches are thought to extend deep
into the glassy area.
Professor Rufus had mailed a de-
scription of his theory to the Uni-
versity of the Philippines, which has
studied tektites for many years. He
also delivered a paper on it at a meet-
ing of the American Association for
the Advancement of Science.

In Summary
Robert A. Campbell, former trea-
surer of the University and Mayor
of Ann Arbor, was honored last night
by the American Legion at their
annual citizenship banquet at the
Union.
Campbell served three terns as
mayor and is now president of the
city park commission and a member
of the city planning commission.
Speaker at last night's banquet
was Edward Scheiberling, depart-
ment commander of the American
Legion in New York State. The din-
ner was sponsored jointly by the
American Legion posts of Washtenaw
County.
S * *
Residents of Ann Arbor who
have formerly been frustrated by
the drivers license burueau clos-
ing at 6 p.m. each week day will
soon have more convenient hours
at their disposal when renewal
time comes around.
Beginning Monday, the bureau
will be open each Wednesday un-
til 9 p.m., according to Police
Chief Norman E. Cook.
** *
Cancer Control Month being April,
the Ann Arbor district of Women's
Field Army of the American Society
for the Control of Cancer will bekin
their intensive educational campaign
here Monday.
RADIO and
MICHIGAN Cabs

His candidacy for Democratic
nomination for New Jersey gover-
nor has been announced by Secre-
tary of the Navy Charles Edison
(above), son of the late inventor.
Edison was recently appointed
Secretary to fill the vacancy caused
by the death of Claude Swanson.

Guest Instructors Announced
For Music Summer Session

4
--' By JUNE McKEE -

4W

In addition to the 40 members of
the faculty who will conduct the 1940
School of Music Summer Session be-
ginning June 24, will be 14 well known
artist musicians who will serve as
guest instructors, President Charles
A. Sink of the School announced yes-
terday.
Courses will be offered in all bran-
ches of music leading to the degrees
of Bachelor and Master of Music and
emphasis will be placed upon instruc-
tion meeting the needs of teachers,
supervisors and directors engaged in
music education work in public
schools and universities.
Among the guest instructors will
be William Breach, supervisor of
music of the Buffalo Schools; Prof.
Olaf Christiansen, conductor of chor-
al music at the Oberlin Conservatory,
Oberlin, Ohio; Roxy Cowin, assistant
supervisor of music in Ann Arbor
Public Schools; N. De Rubertis, direc-
tor of the Kansas City Orchestral
Training School, Kansas City, Mo.;
and Father William J. Finn, director
of the Paulist Choristers in New York
City.
Other instructors are Cleo Fox,

director of music in the Kalamazoo
Public Schools; Charles Gilbert of the
Curtis Institute in Philadelphia, Pa.;
Dale C. Harris, supervisor of music
in the Pontiac Public Schools; and
Ernst Krenek, professor of composi-
tion at Vassar, Poughkeepsie, N.Y.
Erik W. Leidzen, New York City
band conductor; Clifford Lillya, direc-
tor of the Marshall High School Band,
Chicago, Ill.; Arthur Schwuchow, di-
rector of music in the Aberdeen
Schools, Aberdeen, S.D.; Dr. Frank
Simon, director of the Armco Band,
Middletown, Ohio; and Prof. Arthur
Poister, professor of organ at the
Oberlin Conservatory of Music, Ober-
lin, Ohio will also be here this sum-
mer.
A special feature for the benefit
of School of Music students will be
a three-week High School Band Clin-
ic in which more than 100 high school
musicians, recommended by their
principals and supervisors, will as-
semble for instruction in ensemble
music. "They in turn will provide a
vehicle for advanced conductors and
directors perfecting their own pro-
fessional endeavors," President Sink
pointed out.

New Telescope
escribed Here
Ormondroyd Addresses
EngineeringSociety
Construction of the 200-inch tele-
scope at Mt. Palomar, California,
was described Wednesday night at a
meeting of the American Society of
Mechanical Engineers in the Union,
by Prof. Jesse Ormondroyd, of the
mechanical engineering department.
Professor Ormondroyd was in sole
charge of the manufacturing design,
and actual manufacturing of the
mechanical parts of the telescope.
Weighing one million pounds, the
giant steel unit will be moved by a
one half horsepower motor, the speak-
er said during the course of his talk.
This is possible because of a new type
of bearing developed to eliminate
friction difficulties rising out of the
great weight supported.
The largest bearing evei' built will
be used in the supporting mechanism
Professor Ormondroyd added, a bear-
ing which measures 46 feet in diam-
eter. Plans for the work have beer
in existence since as early as 1918,
he said.

,)
1
.,
1
,

NORMAL CHOIR BACH FESTIVAL
Excerpts from MINOR MASS
300 SINGERS NORMAL CHOIR
and GUEST HIGH SCHOOL CHOIRS
FREDERICK ALEXANDER, Conductor
PEASE AUDITORIUM Friday, March 29, 8 P.M. Exactly
Ypsilanti No Reser-vations Seats 25 cents

Phones
3030 or 7000

p

IHeart-hitting love drama of
the nursing profession by
the author of "The Citadel"

NOW SHOWING

Yesterday morning's broadcasting
class was specially spotlighted by the
appearance of two eminent campus
visitors-Louis Untermeyer and Mor-
ton Gould. As "the best since Gersh-
win" Mr. Untermeyer described com-
poser Gould, after hearing his piano
rendition of Ravel's "Bolero," in whch
the swelling intensity of percussion
instruments was retained through
using the arms, hitting more notes.
Mr. Gould also played a number of
his recordings, including the "Second
American Symphonette."
The complete broadcast of the
Band's annual Spring Concert, guest
directed by Morton Gould last night,
was recorded by the Broadcasting
Service. Transcriptions may be or-
dered at Morris Hall.
Then the last "Game of the Week"
features "Playing Petty," at 3:30 p.m.,
over WJR. Herein Jack Gelder, '40,
and your scribe, will quiz contestants
June Madison, '40Ed, Helen Ralston,
'40, John Schwarzwalder, Grad., and
Peter Antonelli, '41. Dick Slade, '41,
will announce this final performance
of the proven most-popular campus
program.

,
y
f
a

Suomi Club To Plan
Folk Dance Program
Discussion of a choice of folk dances
for demonstration at International
Open House is scheduled for tomor-
row's meeting of Suomi Club, or-
ganization for students of Finnish
extraction, 8 p.m. in Room 305 of the
Union.
All members have been urged to
attend by Toivo Liimatainen, '41E,
president, in order that a dance group
may be chosen. The program com-
mittee, headed by Olivia Petrell,
Grad., will submit plans for activi-
ties following the Spring Vacation.

(DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN

1 rom the novel u
CLn1E CROW
Coming SPENCER TRACY

BRENDA FORBES PETER CUS1ING
"I Take This Woman"

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Pens - Typewriters - Supplies
"Writers Trade With Rider's"
RIDER'S
302 South State St.
oil' III4

B
E
E
R

CHAMPAGNE
The BEER VAULT
303 North 5th Avenue
Dial 8200
For Delivery - 9 A.M. to Midnite

W

FRIDAY, MARCH 29, 1940 J
VOL. L. No. 131
Notices
To the Members of the Faculty of3
the College of Literature, Science,
and the Arts: The sixth regular meet-
ing of the Faculty of the College of
Literature, Science, and the Arts for
the academic session of 1939-190
will be held in Room 1025 Angell Hall,
April 1, 1940, at 4:10 p.m.
The reports of the several commit-
tees, instead of being read orally at
the meeting, have been prepared in
advance and are included with this
call to the meeting. They should be
retained in your files as part of the
minutes of the April meeting.
Edward H. Kraus
AGENDA:
1, Consideration of the minutes of
the "eeting of March 4, 1940 (pp.
612-618), which were; distributed by
campus mail.
2. Consideration of the reports
submitted with the call to the meet-
ing: a, Executive Committee, pre-
pared by Professor J. W. Bradshaw.
b. University Council, prepared by
Professor H. C. Carver, c. Executive
Board of the Graduate School, pre-
pared by Professor L. I. Bredvold. d.
Senate Advisory Committee on Uni-
versity Affairs, prepared by Profes-
sor Campbell Bonner.
Since the last meeting of the Facul-
ty the Deans' Conference has not met.
Hence no report can be submitted
with the call for the Faculty meeting.
The Conference will meet, however,
on Wednesday, March 27, and a ver-
bal report on that meeting will be
made.
3. Concentration regulations.
4. Evaluation of faculty services.
5. New business.
All June Graduates in the College
of Architecture, Schools of Education,
Forestry and Conservation, and Music
should fill in grade request cards at

Room 4, U. Hall between April 1 and
April 5. Those failing to file these
cards will assume all responsibility
for late grades which may prohibit
graduation.
To Students Having Library Books:
1. Students having in their possession
books drawn from the University Li-
brary are notified that such books
are due Monday, April 1, before the
impending Spring Vacation, in pursu-
ance of the Regents' regulation:
"Students who leave Ann Arbor for
an absence of more than a week must
first return all borrowed books."
2. Failure to return books before
the vacation will render the student
liable to an extra fine.
3. Students who have special need
for certain books between April 1
and the beginning of the vacation
may retain such books by applying
at the Charging Desk on April 1.
4. Students, who have urgent need
for certain books during the vaca-
tion, will be given permission to draw
these books, provided they are not
(continued on Page 4)
SE DA S Ii

STARTING TODAY
THE PREMIERE OF
GONE WITU THlE W IND
at the MAJESTIC THEATRE
DAVID 0. SELZNICK'S predac*on of
MARGARET MItCHELL'S Story of the Old South
GONE WITH THE WIND.
IN TECHNICOLOR tarrig
CLARK GABLE as Rhea Butlir
LESLIE OLIVIA
HOWARD * DeHAVILLAND
and presenting
VIV I E N L E IG H as &arlettO' Hara
A SELZNICK INTERNATIONAL PICTURE *Directed by VICTOR FLEMING
Screen Play by SIDNEY HOWARD * M~yle by Max Steiner. A Metro-Goldwyn.Mayer Release
RESERVED SEATS_ STILL AVAILABLE
While this engagement is limited, "GONE WITH THE WIND"
will not be shown except at advanced prices ... at least until 1941

I
N
E

II

IA SOCIEDAID HISPANICA
presents
(in SPANIHsIH )
The hilarious misadventure of a student.

SH ER IDA N'SR IOT
Te Gitic'
-was a complete success. .
-Green-Mich. Daily
Presented by
PLAY PRODUCTI)N
Department of Speech
University of Michigan
Friday and Saturday
at 8:30 P.M.
LYDIA MENDELSSOHN
THEATRE
Box Office Open Now
Reserved Seats 75c, 50c, 35d
Phone 6300 for reservations

i

EVENINGS 7:30.
DOORS OPEN 6:30-
SUNDAY MAT. 2:00
DOORS OPEN 1:00 P.M.

WEEK DAY MATS.
10:15 A.M.-2:15 P.M.
NOT RESERVED
DOOS OPEN 9:15 A.M.
GENERAL
ADMISSION
75c (Inc. Tax)

Lydia Mendelssohn Theatre, Monday, April
All Seats Reserved, 50c

1, 8:30

You will see it in its
entirety, exactly as
shown at its famed
Atlanta World
Premiere.

ALL
SEATS RESERVED.
$1.10
(Inc. Tax)

. !1

Box OFFICE
OPEN
9:15 P.M.
TO
10:00 P.M.

11

Box Office Open Saturday, 10:00 A.M.

Phone 6300

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