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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

March 28, 1940 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1940-03-28

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

ALI,

Detroit AluIni
Sponsor Dinner
For Students
Michigan Club Entertaniis
Campus Leaders; Faculty
Members Also Attend
The University of Michigan Club
of Detroit entertained eight Univer-
sity students yesterday at its annual
Campus Leaders Dinner, held in the
University Club.
Student guests were Thomas B.
Adams, '40, president of the Inter-
fraternity Council; Warren Breiden-
bach, '41, star quarter-miler; Ismail
R. Khalidi, Grad., of the Interna-
tional Center; Paul Oberst, Grad.,
chairman of the West Quadrangle
Student Council; Carl Petersen, '40,
manging editor of The Daily; James
S. )Rogers, '42, president of Lloyd
House; Donald H. Treadwell, '42L,
president of the Union; Philip F.
Westbrook, Jr., '40, president of Con-
gress.
Three faculty members from Ann
Arbor attended: Profs. Carl G.
Brandt, Karl Litzenberg and Charles
H. Peake, all of the English depart-
ment. T. Hawley Tapping, general
secretary of the Alumni Association,
and Robert O. Morgan, assistant sec-
retgry of the Association, also were
present.
Representing Detroit alumni was
Mayor Edward J. Jeffries, Jr., of
Detroit. Harry Kipke represented the
Alumni, and Judge Guy A. Miller
was toastmaster.
Intramural Teams
To Debate Sunday
Resumption of the intramural de-
bates under the direction of the
Michigan Union, which were post-
poned for Easter Week, was an-
nounced by Charles Kerner, '41E,
of the executive staff. Two debates
will be held Sunday.
Sigma Alpha Epsilon will argue
against Fletcher Hall in the only
semi-finals event Sunday, and Sigma
Nu will contest Sigma Chi in a tilt
that was postponed. Allen Rumsey
Dormitory, holding a semi-finals po-
sition, will debaterthe winner of this
match at a later date. All teams
are arguing the statement, "Resolved
That Michigan men of today lack
the resourcefulness and hardiness of
their predecessors."
SHERIDAN'S RIOT
"has the whole campus
roaring in laughter."
Presented by
PLAY PRODUCTION
Department of Speech
University of Michigan
Thursday, Friday, Saturday
at 8:30 P.M.
LYDIA MENDELSSOHN
THEATRE
Box Office Open Now
Reserved Seats 75c, 50c, 35c
Phone 6300 for reservations

Swarthmore
Faculty Men
VisitCam pas
Two members of the faculty of
Swarthmore College, Prof. Scott Lilly
of the division of engineering and
Prof. Taylor Anderson of the depart-
ment of history, visited the University
Monday in the course of a trip during
which they are inspecting schools
maintaining honor programs of a
type similar to that in effect at
Swarthmore.
During their stay here the men
visited a number of group meetings
of the Honors Program students and
lunched with the Board of Tutors.
Various similarities and differences
of the system as employed here and
at Swarthmore were discussed.
According to the visting professors,
the system here does not necessitate
as narrow a specialization as the
Swarthmore plan, but they pointed
on the other hand to the benefits
derived by having examiners entirely
external to the college at Swarthmore
rather than in the University but ex-
ternal to the Board of Tutors as it is
here.
Tracy Asked To Talk
For Law Institute
Prof. John Tracy, of the Law
School, has been invited to speak at
the Grand Rapids Bar Association
Law Inst. April 3 in a program de-
signed to bring to the practicing
lawyers of the Grand Rapids vicin-
ity latest developments in law.
Last June the Law School spon-
sored a similar Institute here which
lawyers from all over the state at-
tended. Series of lectures and class-
es were held, and according to Pro-
fessor Tracy the Institute will again
be held this year.
Spanish Society
Prepares To Give
Famous Comedy
"Zaragueta," annual presentation
of La Sociedad Hispanica, is in its
final week of rehearsals in prepara-
tion for its performance at 8:30 p.m.
Monday in the Lydia Mendelssohn
Theatre.
The play, a favorite amateur pro-
duction in Spain for the last forty
years, is concerned with the misad-
ventures of a student who seeks to
get money from his uncle and aunt
without revealing to them that he is
in debt. Faked faintings, misunder-
standings, threatened gunplay and
dousings add to the general hilari-
ousness.
Director of the play Charles Stau-
bach of the romance languages de-
partment is assisted by Joseph Edel-
man, '42, in charge of properties;
Frances Johnson, '41, in charge of
costumes; Harold Barnes, Grad~,
make-up and Earl Thomas, Grad,
stage.
Properties for the play which have
offered problems to the production
staff include a shotgun, a portable
garden pump, quantities of food to
be consumed by a hungry character,
Spanish provincial costumes, and
sound effects ranging from cluck-
ing hens to splashing water.
f

Irl

sh Union Idea Striengthened
By War, Prof. Bromage Says,

BY S. R. WALLACE
England's participation in war atl
the present time has given Eamon
de Valera, prime minister of Eire,
bargaining power for the union of
Ireland, although, obviously, all of
Ireland cannot agree on the heatedly
debated subject, Prof. Arthur W.
Bromage of the political science de-
partment declared yesterday in an
interview.
Although there are many problems
confronting the former Irish Free
State, Professor Bromage pointed out
that politically de Valera still con-,
siders Ireland's partition the major
issue, and that although it is now
constitutionally impossible for Eng-
land to force southern Ireland to aid
her in war, the livestock and live-
stock products which Eire is supply-
ing to industrial England are ex-
tremely valuable and may well form
one aspect of the negotiations for
union.
Opposition Complicates Matter
The situation is complicated, how-
ever, Professor Dromage asserted,
by the fact that the Protestant ma-
jority in four of the six northern
counties of Ulster is vigorously op-
posed to the united Ireland desired
by the Catholic-Nationalists. The
opposition to union is being led by
the determined Lord Craigavon,
prime minister of the government of
Northern Ireland, whose policy is
to "yield not an inch."
While Eire is designated in its

conlitiltion as a "sovereign, inde-
pendent, democratic state," it recog-
ni'es by statute the English kingi
for limited purposes in external re-
lations, Professor Bromage explained.
The northern counties are governed
in local matters by a subordinate
parliament within the United King-
doni.
Conditions have been aggravatedl
because of the continued bombings
by the Irish Republican Army, an
illegal group which believes in union
i.y force and which de Valera claims
has undone years of his own work
based on constitutional methods,
Professor Bromage said.
Relation Pleases de Valera
Nevertheless, an interview granted
to Professor Bromage by Eamon de
Valera last summer conveyed the
distinct impression that the rela-
tionshiu which de Valera had estab-
lished with the British government
was a good one, and yet, according
to Professor Bromage, England has
adopted a policy of non-intervention'
in Ireland's internal differences des-
pile full realization of the situation.
The net result, therefore, Profes-
sor Bromage concluded, is that theret
seems to be no immediate prospect
of England's war activities material-
izing de Valera's dream of union for
Ireland, and that the recent resorting
of the IRA to violence has, in effect,
set back Ireland's progress towards
unit y.

Rotary Club To Entertain.
For Students At Union
The Rotary Club of Ann Arbor will
hold a luncheon in the Ballroom of
the Michigan Union Wednesday,
April 24 for all the sons and daugh-
ters of Rotarians. According to Dean
S. Dana, chairman of the affair,'
there are about 150 on campus, all
of whom are urged to come.
Dr. William W. Bishop will deliver
an address with the title of "The
Library and Its Treasures." The talk
will be illustrated with slides.

Untermeyer Ends Talks On Culture

(Continued from Page 1)

When you begin to influence that

declared him to be the foremost which influenced you, Mr. Unter-
American musician and his "Rhapso- meyer concluded, you are at the
i d inBlu" te fremstAmericanl threshold of cultural maturity._ That,
dy Blue the foremost e said, is where American music
composition. "The Rhapsody re- is today.
fleets the mood of our age," he ex- Mdr. Untermeyer will conclude his
plained. "It has seriousness and lecture program here with a talk,
suavity and raucous comedy. It outside his scheduled series, on "What
cannot take itself seriously for long Makes a Native Culture" before den-
at a time, but must break in with tistry and medical students at 4:15
frequent self-interruptions and im- p.m. tomorrow in the Rackham Grad-
pertinences." uate School.

- S C-'

FRIDAY MORNING AT 10:15 A.M.
THE PREMIERE OF
GONE WITHTHEWIN
at the MAJESTIC THEATRE
DAVID O. SELZNICK'S producdpx of
MARGARET MITCHELL'S Story of the Old South
GONE WITH THlE WIND
IN TECHNICOLOR narrhhg
CLARK GABLE as R/ett Butter
LESLIE OLIVIA
HOWARD * DeHAVILLAND
and PreeTimng
VIVIEN LEIGH as &arlett o'Hara
A SELZNICK INTERNATIONAL PICTURE *Directed by VICTOR FLEMINO
Screen Play by SIDNEY HOWARD . Music by Max Steiner. A Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Release
RESERVED SEATS STILL AVAILABLE
While this engagement is limited, "GONE WITH THE WIND"
will not be shown except at advanced prices.... at least until 1941

Stationery Sales
Fraud Revealed;
Solicitor Is Held
Those students who contracted for
a stationery supply with a salesman
supposedly representing the Royal
Stationery Company of Minneapolis
have been requested by Dean Walter
B. Rea to contact him without delay
at 2 University Hall. The salesman
is in custody at East Lansing for false
representation.
Although the stationery company
is a reputable firm, authorities have
been notified that the alleged repre-
sentative S. L. Fields is not in its em-
ploy. Fields, who has admitted do-
ing a large amount of business on this
campus, is 35 years of age, five feet
seven inches tall, weighs 170 pounds,
and is of medium build with dark
brown hair. His orders were usually
taken for one hundred sheets and en-
velopes at $3.75 of which $1.75 was
paid to him in cash, the remainder
to be paid on receipt of the station -
cry.
Graduates Plan
FutureActivity
Council Selects Chairmen
To Head Committees
The personnel of some of the com-
mitttees in the reorganized Graduate
Council has been selected, according
to Abe Rosenzweig, Grad., chairman
of the central committee, These
committees have already made plans
for future graduate activities, Ros-
enzweig added.
The committees are: Record Club,
Robert Herzog, chairman, assisted by
Sylvia Fidoten, and Urie Bronfen-
brenner; Dance, Louise Toombs,
chairman; Coffee Hour, Jean Brown,
chairman, assisted by William
Cargo, Frances Elstein, and Justine
Schmertz. All are graduate stu-
dents.
The Record Club committee is
planning to hear the broadcasts of
the next four Metropolitan Operas.
The first in a series of graduate teas
was sponsored yesterday by the Cof-
fee Hour committee.
Elections for various department
delegates are now being held, Ros-
enzweig said, and the Council should
be complete within the next week.
Fine Arts Display
Of Chinese Prints
Shown This Week
Examples of Chinese art in the
Han dynasty, taken from tombs in
Shantung, will be on exhibit in the
South Oallery of Alumni Memorial
Hall this week daily until Saturday.
Taken from the walls of tombs of
the family of Wu-Liang-Tz'u in
Shantung, the prints illustrate many
phases of Chinese culture and show
details of daily life, types of archi-
tecture, mythology, religion, history,
even restaurants, and other facts
important to archeologists. These
prints, or rubbings, are made by
placing paper over the original stone,
the latest of which dates from 167
A.D., and inking from the impression
made by the stone.

Today 2-4-7-9-PM.
Last Times Today

'U

Eox OFFICE
OPEN
10:00 A.M.
TO

EVENINGS 7:30
SUNDAY MAT. 2:00
ALLI
SEATS RESERVED

WEEK DAY MATS.
10:15 A.M.-2:15 P.M.
NOT RESERVED
GENERAL
ADMISSION
75c (Inc. Tax)

Extra
In Color: 'OLD HICKORY'
CARTOON - NEWS

You will see it in its
entirety, exactly-as
shown at its famed
Atlanta World
Premiere.

it 10
(Inc. Tax)

li-i
* S. *
.W'-:.**\~.a

I

. ~ w
Silkworth
Tire Co. Win
4th Ave. at. Huron 211 E
Ann Arbor Ph. 4700 Ann Arb

CUBIC
SF x FOOT
ELECTRIC
myr'1wfA 'mk
&VflI

AN absolutey unequalled
value. New 1940 all-steel
welded cabinets - completely
sealed to cut out current waste
and keep cold in. Each has
hermetically sealed Scotch
Yoke mechanism-the finest.
What a beauty, what a bar-
gain! But act quickly! This
opportunity cannot last!

FREEZ'R SHELF GIBSONS
Full-width Freez'r Shelf multiplies usable
shelf area, provides big-eapacity_ freezing
or Frozen Storage zone. Beneath Is Nor-
nal Zone foraill usual food keeping, and
then the Moist-Cold none for keeping
fruits and vegetables without wilt or
shrinxk. Have the 3 zones modern foods
andc .ookery require At this price
speak for yours now l $169.95
ufus- ilkworth's
mchester 6 E. Michigan
East Liberty Ph.: Ypsilanti 720
or Ph. 2-2644 Ph.: A.A. 6400

CAROLE
NEXT SUNDAY
SPENCER TRACY
In "I TAKE THIS WOMAN"

BRIAN A fNNE
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