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March 27, 1940 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1940-03-27

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PAGE ',0.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

WED NESrAY, MURCTI 2?, 1940

Annual Spanish
Play Will Open
MondayNioht
"Zaragueta," annual Spanish play 1
to be presented by La Sociedad His-
panica Monday in the Lydia Mendel-
ssohn Theatre, has been preceded by
mnany other productions sponsored
by the organization.
One of the earliest presentations
was another production of "Zara-
gueta" in 1921. The following year
the play given was "The Grasshopper
Ants," a story based on an old fable.
"Juan de las Vinas" and "Dona
Clarinos" were presented in 1923 and
1924.
In 1925 "Anything for Love" was
produced, while "Fencing at Love"
was given in 1927. The following
year the club broke away from its
tradition of single plays, and gave
three one-act plays: "The Lover,"
"The Marquesa's Disappointment,"
and "The Miracle."
"Rosina Is Fickle" and "Without
Words" were presented in 1932. Last
year's production was entitled "A
Romantic Young Lady."
Typeswriters
Office and Portable Models
New, and Reconditioned.

Motion picture highlights of the
famed San Francisco-Oakland Bay
bridge will be the feature attraction
of an open meeting of the A.S.C.E. at
7:30 p.m. today in the Natural Sci-
ence Auditorium.
Pictorial and technical aspects of
the' bridge will be presented in the
motion picture, to be shown by Prof.
James H. Cissel of the civil engi-
neering department. Professor Cissel
has been termed an authority on the
construction of large bridges, and is
at present on a commission studying
the possibility of building a span
across the Straits of Mackinac.
The inner mysteries of the honey-
comb of heating tunnels beneath the
Campus grounds will be explained by
Edward C. Pardon, superintendent of
Buildings and Grounds at the Sigma
Xi meeting at 7:45 p.m. today in the
Rackham Amphitheatre. Following
light refreshments, the group will be
taken on an inspection tour of the
University Power House.
Campus Leaders
To Attend Dinner
Eight campus leaders will attend
the annual Campus Leaders Dinner,
to be given by the University of Michi-
gan Club of Detroit at 6:30 p.m. to-
day in the University Club.
Judge Guy A. Miller will be toast-
master. Representing Detroit alumni
and the Board of Regents will be
Mayor Edward J. Jeffries, Jr., of De-
troit and Harry Kipke respectively.
Faculty and alumni guests from
Ann Arbor will include Profs. Carl G.
Brandt, Charles H. Peake and Karl
Litzenberg, all of the English depart-
ment, T. Hawley Tapping, general
secretary of the Alumni Association,
and Robert O. Morgan, assistant
secretary of the Association.

Country's Communications Disrupted By Magnetic Storm
HAYDEN PLANETARIUM
SKETCH OF SUNSPOT r
MARCH 23,1940 BY
WILLIAM H.BARTON, JR.
EXECUTIVE CURATOR. e.
GREAT SUNSPOT GROUP
/ tSEEN AUG.8, 1917 BY
MT. WILSON OBSERVATORY.
it" DISC REPRESENTS
. ''.*COMPARATIVE SIZE
fr9-1 OF EARTH .
These Associated Press diagrams indicate how a magnetic storm, probably the worst in modern history,
disrupted United States wire and wireless conununicationis. Center diagram shows how sunspots generated
a shower of electrical particles which bombarded the earth and riddled man-made currents. Upper left, an
approximation of the location, not in scale, of the sunspots as they appeared to Hayden Planetarium ob-
servers. Lower right is a drawing of the 1917 sunspot g reup with the black disk representing the comparative
size of the earth.

DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN

WEDNESDAY, MARCH 27, 1940
VOL. L. No. 129.
Notices
To All Faculty Members:
1. Life Annuities or life insurance
either or both may be purchased by
members of the faculties Trem the
Teachers Insurance and Annuity As-
sociation of America and premiums
for either life Annuity or life Insur-
ance, or both, may be deducted at
the written request of the policy-
holder from the monthly payroll of
the University, and in such cases will
be remitted directly by the Univer-

sity, on the monthly basis. The
secretary's office has on file blank
applications for annuity policies, or
life insurance policies, and rate books,
for the convenience of members of
the University staff desiring to make
use of them.
2. The Regents at their meeting of
January, 1919 agreed that any mem-
ber of the Faculties entering the serv-
ice of the University since Nov. 17,
1915, may purchase an Annuity from
the above-named Association, toward
the cost of which the Regents would
make an equal contribution up to
five per cent of his annual salary
(Continued on Page 4)
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Since 1908 Phone 6615

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agnetic Field
Is Influenced
BY sun Spots
By KARL KESSLER
To sun spots, the elusive cyclonic
storms which sporadically appear in
the solar atmospheres, can be in-
directly attributed one of the worst
cases of communication disruptions
in recent years which played havoc
with radio, telephone and telegraph
lines Sunday.
Most noticeable effect of these solar
disturbances, according to investiga-
tions carried out'by Dr. Ross Gunn,
'20, of the Naval Observatory in
Washington, D.C., is their influence
on the earth's magnetic field. Gunn
received his M.S. from the University
in 1921 and his Ph.D. from Yale Uni-
versity in 1926. He served as an in-
structor in the College of Engineer-
ing at the University from 1920 to
1922.
Simultaneous observations of sun
spots and changes in the magnetic
field have indicated that there is a
high degree of correlation between the
two. The influence of these sudden
fluctuations in magnetic fields upon
wireless communication is marked,
as radio waves are electro-magnetic
and are thus influenced by magnetic
changes in the medium through
which they travel.
Less obvious is the relation of mag-
netic disturbances to telegraph and
telephone communication. The con-
nection here lies through' what is
known to communication engineers
as "earth currents."
Fluctuations in the strength of a
magnetic field induce currents in
electrical conductors within the shift-
ing field. In the case of earth cur-
rents, the conductor is the layer of
moist earth near the surface of the
ground.
The difference in potential between
points in these surface layers ordi-
narily varies from zero to 50 volts.
In the case of violent magnetic storms
as those that occurred Sunday, these
potential differences may be as high
as 500 volts or more.
Thus, since telegraph systems em-,
ploy the earth as part of their circuit,
these sudden and large changes in the
magnitude of the earth currents not
only make transmission difficult, but
often cause cable insulations to burn
out.
These disturbances may be com-
pletely local in character or may ex-
tend over the whole country. The
magnetic storm which passed Sunday
appears to have covered an area ex-
tending from Europe into the Middle
West.
Aluni Club Will Hear
President Rutihven Talk
President and Mrs. Ruthven will be
guests of honor at the annual Spring
Banquet of the University of Michi-
(an Club of Grosse Pointe, to be held
at 7 p.m. today in the Whittier Hotel.
The group will hear addresses by
Dr. Ruthven and Carl Bauer, Jr., pres-
ident of the Ninth District (eastern
Michigan) of the Alumni Association.
Regent John Lynch, a member of the
Grosse Pointe Club, will also attend.

'Case' Method Benefits Student
In Business, Prof. Griffin Says

Practice in the analysis of actualj
business problems is the most import-
ant benefit to the student of the
School of Business Administration
from emphasis on the use of the case
method of instruction, Prof. Clare E.
Griffin, dean of the school, said yes-
terday.
This method, he continued, has
been used by business schools for ap-
proximately 20 years, being preceded
by several years in the field of law.
Dean Langdell of the Harvard Law
School was a pioneer in the develop-
ment of the method, and Harvard was
one of the first institutions to adopt
it, Dean Griffin commented.
A case, as presented to a student,
consists of the statement of a defin-
ite problem which has actually con-
fronted some company, Dean Griffin
explained. Included may be possible
solutions or a statement of what steps

were taken by the firm in question
and what their results were, he said.
The student is expected to study,
analyze and work out these problems,
he commented, and to reach his
recommendations with specific points
in favor of them. This analysis, ac-
cording to Dean Griffin, composes
one of the most important parts of
the instruction, teaching how to study
a problem to grasp its different angles
and developing a procedure of anal-
ysis for the individual' student.
Another advantage of the case
method, he pointed out, is that it
presents material in an interesting
way. At the same time, he said, it
enables the students to make deci-
sions without being discharged from
a job for any mistakes made in them.
The advantages of the case method,
he said, make it potentially a more
effective type of instruction than the
lecture, text and discussion methods.

.G.::;: 'A 'd.:
isrn..< as - %". y:

PROF. TELEQUIZ says:
ei

*1

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"Writers Trade With Rider's"
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Matinees

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Nig h/s
35c

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QUESTION: What is a "person-to-person" long
distance telephone call?
ANSWER: A call on which the operator is asked
to esablish connection with a named per-
son or extension number at a given tele-
phone.
Use person-to-person service when you must talk to a
particular-individual and no one else will do, or if you
call an extension telephone on a private branch exchange
switchboard. Person-to-person rates to points not shown
below will be found on page 5 of the telephone directory
or can be obtained from "Long Distance" (dial 0).
RATES FOR THREE-MINUTE NIGHT AND
SUNDAY PERSON-TO-PERSON CALLS
ANN ARBOR to:

0

I

DAILY 2-4----7-9 P.M.
Today and Thursday
rrA
Fratic olv ';ra
b raf an' 3
that tor t ;_r
TECHNICOLOR FEATURETTE "OLD HICKORY"
"DOG IN A MANSION" WORLD NEWS

Albion
A a .....
Battle Creek
Bay City.
Big Rapids
Buffalo, N.Y.
Chicago, Ill.
Flint
C ram " Iapids

$ .55 Grayling
.95 Houghton
.60 Manistee
.65 Milwaukee, Wis.
.75 Nashville, Tenn.

I

.95
.90
.55
70

Petoskey
Port Huron
Saginaw
Washington, D.C.

.$ .90
1.40
.95
.90
1.40
.95
60
60
1.30

Om a call for which the
char-e is 50c or more,
a federal tax applies.
~~MICH IGAN BELL T ELEPHONE

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