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March 23, 1940 - Image 5

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1940-03-23

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SATURDAY - STARCH 3, 1940

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE FIVE

SATURDAY, MARCH 23, 1940 PAGE FIVE

Fascist Policy
Aims At Peace,
Villari Claims'
Former Italian Minister
Points Out Analogies
To First World War
(Continued from Page 1)
President Roosevelt could get togeth-
er and some way bring peace to
chaotic Europe."
In explaining Italy's anti-semitic
laws, he claimed that there exists
no social boycott of Jews. The utmostI
friendship is maintained between
Jews and Gentiles in Italy, he as-
serted. He reasoned that the laws
were invoked because of the "huge
influx of Eastern Jews after the war
and the currency speculation which
they engaged in."
He maintained that Italy is enjoy-
ing a "war boom" at the fresent
time and that the Italian economic
situation was "satisfactory" despite
the difficulty in securing raw ma-
terials. "Italy has no unemployment,
and we boast a prosperous agricul-
tural economy," he said.
Dr. Villari retired from the Italian
Ministry of Foreign Affairs in Feb-
ruary, 1938 and now "works for the
government in minor matters of
writing and lecturing in English-
speaking countries," he indicated. He
is a former member of the staff of
the League of Nations.
Professor Anning To Talkj
Freshmen mathematics students
from the Math 14 class will be guests
at the meeting of the Junior Mathe-
matical Society at 7:30 p.m. Monday
in Room 3021 Angell Hall. Prof. Nor-
man H. Anning of the mathematics
department will speak on the sine of
18 degrees.

Col. Edwards
Called Soldier
And Lawyer I
By A. P. BLAUSTEIN
Lieut.-Col. Basil D. Edvards. c ljr
man of the military science depart-
ment, has had a versatile career in
the army as soldier, lawer, student
and instructor.
Born in Powder Mills, Ky., in 1887.
Colonel Edwards attended school
there until 1908 when h^ entered
West Point. He graduated in 1912 as
a second lieutenant in the infantry
and served for two years with the
30th division in Alaska.
After that he was assigned by the
War Department to attend Harvard
Law School where he received his
LLB in 1917. During the year 1916-
1917, he served as instructor of law
at the Military Academy, and when
the World War broke out he went
across as an infantry captain in the
fifth division. Later, during the war,
he was attached to General Persh-
ing's staff and then served as lieu-
tenant-colonel in the Army of Occu-
pation in Germany.
Whenhe returned to Americaahe
was restored to his former rank, and
in 1920 he was made a major.
During that year he was on the'
general staff in Washington and then
was appointed professor of military
science at Emory College in Atlanta,
3a. Later he was on the staff of the
commanding general of the fourth
corps area in Atlanta and then spent
a year studying at one of the military
schools.
Transfered to the judge advocate's
department in 1924, he did legal work
for. a year and was made an infantry
officer again when he went back to
teaching soldiery. He was a student
at the Army War College at Wash-
ington for the next three years and
then was appointed chairman of the
military science department here.1

Queen Mary Leaves New York Destination Is Unknown

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Ann Arbor
Here Is Today's News
In Suiuiniary
Six persons have been named by
the six Washtenaw County Ameri-
can Legion posts to share honors at
the citizenship banquet Thursday at
the Union.
The Ann Arbor post has chosen for-
mer Mayor Robert A. Campbell, once
treasurer of the University. Others
are: Ypsilanti, Prof. Charles M. Elli-
ott; Chelsea, Effa Armstrong Dancer;
Milan, Anna E. Delaforce; Manches-
ter, Nellie Ackerson, and Saline, Dr.
J. B. Wallace.
Governor Dickinson will be reprel
sented at the dinner by Harry Kelly,
secretary of state. President Ruth-
ven will represent the University.
The dinner is open to the public.
* * *
Washtenaw County census tak-
ers are to be put through a thor-
ough course of instruction on pro-
cedure of census enumeration.
The class will meet from 8 a.m.
to 4 p.m. Tuesday and Wednes-
day at the Union and will be at-
tended by from 125 to 150 persons.
Miss Inez Drake of Jackson is to
direct the school.

Faculty-Student
Bridge Match
Planned Today
Arrangements Are Made
For "He-She". Meeting
Pollock Plans Lecture
Members of the University Club
representing the faculty and stu-
dents will meet in a return bridge
match at 2 p.m. today in the Union.
The faculty team won the first
match several weeks ago, and it is
expected that the students, who were
selected from the regular Tuesday
night sessions, will treat this match
as a grudge. The tourney is being
directed by Harold Singer, '41.
The "He-She" bridge tournament
will be conducted next Saturday at
the Union. This contest is designed
to demonstrate the relative merits
of male and female students at
bridge.
Prof. James K .Pollock of the po-
litical science department will speak
on government and politics as a ca-
reer at 7:30 p.m. Wednesday in the
small ballroom of the Union. To be
given under the auspices of the Union
staff, this talk is under the direction
of Robert Ulrich, '41, and Dick
Strain, '42.
The second annual Bunny Hop,
under the direction of Doug Gould,
'41, will be given tonight as a special
dance.
results were not striking. The par-
tial ineffectiveness of the project was
not laid to lack of emo'tional treat-
ment or lack of proper facilities so
much as to economic insecurity and
unwholesome social attitudes on the
part of most of the families con-
cerned, factors which breed malad-
justments in the children exposed to
them.

Belching smoke as her long idle engines warm to their task, the huge liner Queen Mary, world's third
largest and one of the fastest, pointed her nose downstream in the Hudson en route to the open sea. The
Queen Mary had been tied up in New York since the day after the start of the war. The ship sailed under
sealed orders, her destination a British Admiralty secret.
Ann Arbor Boys Guidance Project

Last Sunday Marvin Brooks, Free-
dom township farmer, lost his life
when a fire destroyed his house on a
Manchester onion farm. Earl Lamb,
who resides on the same farm, at-
Sociology books tell us that al- ing done for the maladjusted child I connected with the project, have at- tempted to drag him to safety but
though 2 to 10 per cent of our school before he becomes a community tempted to appraise the project and failed.
populations arc composed of prede- I nuisance. measure the results achieved. Thursday, fire of undetermined ori-
linquents, few readily available agen- In 1935 The Ann Arbor Boys Guid- The project as described in the gin destroyed Lamb's home while he
cies and techniques exist in most ance Project was set up as a research book included a summer vacation for was in Manchester. He discovered it
experiment by local community lead- the boys at the University Fresh Air burned to the ground on returning.
communities throughout the United ers to develop technique for treating Camp at Patterson Lake, and an in-
States for treating this portion of the juvenile maladjustment. An initial tensive "follow-up" program through- the gains made by the treatment
juvenile population. Guidance clin- grant of $18,000 was secured from the out the winter. This was done by group over the untreated group seem
ics are few and expensive, while Horace H. Rackhan Fund, and 87 assigning the boys to cabin groups comparatively small, the authors say.
character-building agencies such as "endangered boys" were chosen to be at the summer camp on the basis of A slightly better average health score
the YMCA and the Boy Scouts aim the "guinea pigs." For three years their own choice, closely observing and a slight improvement in anti-so-
at the entire group, adjusted and these boys were subjected to all of them for eight weeks, and ultimately cial behavior was achieved, but the
maladjusted alike. But little is be- the technical treatment that the continuing the camp counselors' re-
medical, educational, recreational, so- lationship with the boys throughout
ciologicAl, and clinical agencies in the years, by means of group activity,
Ann Arbor could provide. A similar personal guidance, and individual
treatment.:

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CHURCH
DIRECTORY

40 k-

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group of boys called the control group
was chosen and left untreated as a
basis for comparison.
Just recently a book came off the
press, entitled "Integrating The
Camp, The Community, And Social
Work," which tells the story of this
experiment. Its authors, Prof. Low-
ell J. Carr, Director of the Michigan
Child Guidance Institute, Prof. Mil-
dred A. Valentine. Project Research
Director, and Marshall Levy, Project
Director, who were all intimately
DAILY OFFICIAL
BULLETIN1
(Continued from Page 4)
Communion and Sermon by the Rev.
Frederick W. Leech; 11:00 a.m. Fes-I
tival Morning Prayer and Holy Coin-.
mun ion and Sermon by the Reverend
Henry Lewis; 4:00 p.m. Festival Jun-
ior Church Service and Easter Pag-
ecant; 7:30 p.m. Student Easter Serv-
ice, Harris Hall.
First Presbyterian Church: Two
identical services are being planned
for Easter Sunday morning, the first
at 7:45 a.m. and the second at 10:45
a.m. Dr. W. P. Lemon's sermon topic
will be "On Having a Future."
Westminster Student Guild will
meet for supper and fellowship hour
at 5:30 p.m. At 7 o'clock there will
be a program on "Easter in Litera-
ture."

Despite the expenditure by the
project and the camp of $163 per
boy in the first year, and about $93
per boy in each of the next two years
Colleges egin
Foreign elief
$35,000 Is Set As Goal
By Christian Council
(Special To The Daily)
NEW YORK, March 22.-Fifty col-
leges in wide sections of the country
have undertaken drives for relief
funds and scholarships for European
students who are victims of war and
persecution because c race, politics,
Sor religion.
Spensored jointly by the National
Intercollegiate Christian Council and
the International Student Service, a
European Student Service Fund has
been inaugurated with $35,000 set as
the goal for this semester. Head-
quarters for the organization are
located in New York City.
In the first week of the drive which
started this month, Smith College
students raised $4,100 of which $3,000
is being cabled to Geneva immediate-
ly. At Yal^ University a goal of
$5,000 has been set. Initial amounts
from other colleges have already
reached the New York office.

TONICGHT
"The
BUNNY
'llop,,

Free monogramined eggs
for the girls
nIlCHIGlflpl
One dollar thecul
Wlel

I I I

HILLEL FOUNDATION
East University at Oakland. Dial 3779.
Dr. Isaac Rabinowitz, Director.
Saturday, 8:15 P.M. Hillel Play: "The Gentle
People," in Lydia Mendelssohn Theatre.
Sunday, 11:00 A.M. Reform Services. Dr. Isaac
Rabinowitz will speak on: "Are Jews Too
Intellectual?"
8:00 P.M. Musicale featuring new additions to
the record collection.
Tuesday, 7:00 P.M. Class in Conversational
Hebrew.
Wednesday, 7:15 P.M. Class in Jewish History.
Friday, 7:30 P.M. Conservative Service. Fireside
discussion led by Prof. Rowe.
FIRST METHODIST CHURCH
State and Washington Streets.
Charles W. Brashares, Minister.
Choir Director, Hardin Van Deursen.
Organist, Mary Porter.
8:00 A.M. Worship Service. Dr. Barshares' sub-
ject is: "Easter."
9:45 A.M. Student Class in Stalker Hall.
10:40 A.M. Identical service as 8:00 A.M.
6:30 P.M. Wesleyan Guild. A program of Easter
in music, art and poetry. Refreshments and
fellowship hour follow.
ST. ANDREWS EPISCOPAL CHURCH
Catherine at Division Street.
Rev. Henry Lewis, Rector.
Rev. Frederick W. Leech, Assistant Minister.
7:00 A.M. Choral Holy Communion.
9:00 A.M. Choral Holy Communion.
11:00 A.M. Festival Morning Prayer, Sermon, and
Holy Communion.
4:00 P.M. Festival Junior Church Service and
Easter Pageant.
7:30 P.M. Student Easter Service in Harris Hall.
FIRST CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH
State and William Streets.
Leonard A. Parr, D.D., Minister.
Director of Music, Donn Chown.
Organist, Mrs. Mary McCall Stubbins.
7:00 A.M. Easter Early Morning Service, fol-
lowed by breakfast at the Church.
9:30 A.M. Junior and intermediate departments
of the Church School.

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4

FIRST CHURCH OF CHRIST, SCIENTIST
409 South Division Street
Sunday, 10:30 A.M. Services.
11:45 A.M. Sunday School.
Wednesday, 7:30 P.M. Wednesday Evening Meet-
ing.

1111

FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
Corner of 512 East Huron.
Rev. C. IH. Loucks, Minister.
Mr . Walter Kimble, Minister of Music.
9:30 A.M. Graduate Bible Class.
Prof. LeRoy Waterman, teacher.
10:30 A.M. Morning Worship and Baptismal Ser-
vice. Sermc.: topic: "The Power of the Res-
lirection,''
7:;30 P.M. Eafe~r Play: "The Dawnirg," by Ly-
man R,. Bayard.
BETHLEHEM EVANGELICAL CHURCH
Theodore Schmale, Pastor.
432 South Fourth Avenue. Dial 8498.
6:30 A.M. S,_nrise Easter Service.
9:30 A.M. Church School.
10:30 A.M. Easter Service. Sermon topic: "The
Power of His Resurrection."
No Student Fellowship.
FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
1432 Washtenaw Avenue. Dial 2-4466.
William P. Lemon, D.D., Minister.
Lillian Dilts, Assistant.
William N. Barnard, Director of Music.
9:30 A.M. Church School. Special Easter pro-
gram. Two plays will be presented: "Spring
in th3 Brown Meadow." by kindergarten and
primary .departments. and "Her Easter
Choice," by high school girls.
7:45 A.M. and 10:45 A.M. Two services alike.
Morning Worship Service. "On Having a
Future," will be the subject of Dr. W. P.
Lemon.
10:45 A.M. Nursery for those who desire to leave
their small children while they attend the
morning service.
5::30 P.M. Westminster Student Guild will meet

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Caj tei' 001heI
C~4
HERE IT IS!
YOUR EASTER DINNER MENU THAT WE PROMISED
YOU. THIS EASTER THE ALLENEL HAS SPARED NO
EFFORT TO GIVE YOU A DINNER THAT WILL PLEASE
YOUR EVERY TASTE WHIMSY, AND LEAVE YOU
WIT FJ A FINE FEELING OF
SAl TISACTION.
file jte,' I(ehu
Choice of
FRESHII SHIRIMP COCKTAIL . BLUE POINTS IN HALF SHELL
FRESH FRUIT CUP .C.. .. ,.CHILLED TOMATO JUICE
CHICKEN SOUP A LA REIN . .... CONSOMME EN CUP
CELERY . . . RADISHES . . . MIXED OLIVES'
.Kf
Roast Young Torn Turkey, Dressing, Cranberry Sauce $1.00
Baked Sugar-Cured Ham, Glaze Pineapple . . . . $1.00
Whole Spring Chicken, Fried or Broiled,.......$1.00
Roast Capon Chicken, Nut Dressing . . . . . $1.00
Roast Muscovy Duckling, with Jelly . . . . . $1.00
Roast Easter Lainb, Mint Sauce . . . . . . . . $1.00
Braised Guinea Hen . . . . . . . . . . . . $1.25
Whole Broiled Live Lobster, Shoestring Potatoes $1.25
Broiled Allenel Special Steak.. . . . . ...... $1.25
Broiled Beef Tenderloin, with Mushrooms. . .., $1.25
Planked Beef Porterhouse Steak . . . . . . . . $1.75
MASHED or JULIENNE POTATOES
FRESH PEAS or FRESH ASPARAGUS IN BUTTER
FRESH VEGETABLE SALAD . . CHOICE OF DRESSING
ORANGE SHERBET,
t' URITT- STRAWBE/RRY PARFAIT OR SUNDAE

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