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March 22, 1940 - Image 2

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The Michigan Daily, 1940-03-22

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PAGE O

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

FRIDAY, MARCH 22, 1940

PAGE TWO FRIDAY, MARCH 22, 1940

Ann Arbor

Miss Williams Urges Students
To Help American Youth1

Christian Gives

Here Is
In

Today's
Summary

News

Act RecitalToday

d
r

...._.........

Totally blind, Mrs. Beulah Rich-
ards of Ypsilanti lives today because
her son Cecil, six years old, had a
cold Wednesday and had to stay
home from school.
Cecil and his mother were listening
to the radio when he suddenly dis-
covered that their house was afire.
With flames sweeping along the wall
close to the only available exit, Cecil
took his mother by the hand and led
her to safety.
The house was completely demol-
ished. Nothing was saved but the
clothing worn by mother and son as
they made their escape.
Ann Arbor Rotarians were in-
formed at their last meeting by
Prof. Nathan Sinai of the School
of Public Health that, while wo-
men are a good life insurance.
risk, they are a bad health insur-
ance risk.
Whe female sickness rate is 16
per cent higher than the male,
but women live longer than men
on the average, Professor Sinai
told the group.
Professor Sinai was speaking
on the health insurance plan. It
is because of the difference in
sickness rate, he said, that in-
surance companies are wary of
handling health insurance for
groups with a high percentage of
women members.
* * *
Students entering the Detroit-Hur-
on-Clinton Parkway essay contest
will be assisted by booklets offering
a factual background to the project
which were distributed in Washtenaw
County schools yesterday.
Any high school student is eligible,
to enter the contest. Essays are to
concern the parkway-playground
plan.

Restoration Of NYA
Jobs Provided In
Needed Badly, She

Cuts,
Act,
Says

Centering her talk, "Jobs. NYA and!
the American Youth Act," about the
immediate need for jobs of 4,500,000
youths, out of school, out of work,
Frances Williams, national adminis-
trative secretary of the American
youth Congress, told an audience of
students and faculty members Wed-
nesday that the American Youth Act
was the solution to one of the most
vital and urgent problems on the
American scene today.
Aiss Williams, who is on a national
tour, described the chaotic conaition
of the German youth following the
war, "who despairing of not being
included in things, literally jumped
into the arms of Hitler, who gave
them a feeling of belonging." There
is danger, she warned of Aierican
youth "jumping" for the first d-ma-
gogue who offers jobs.
Murry Fathered Bill
The proposed Act, introduced in'
the Senate by Sen. James E. Mur-
ray with a working capital of $500,-
000,000 would provide not only added
vocational guidance and training, and
employment opportunities for youths
between the ages of 16 and 25, but it
would provide increased educational
opportunities for high school, college
and post-graduate students and give
them a dignified place in society,
Miss Williams pointed out.
The AYA is different from the pres-
ent NYA in duration, policies and ap-
propriations, she stated. While the
present NYA is on a temporary year-
to-year basis, subject to scrapping
by any administration, the AYA
would establish a permanent admin-
istration, Miss Williams explained.
NYA policies are determined by a

single administrator, she continued, Organis's Goo] Friday
but the AYA would set up a national
board, democratically controlled with C er IS'tradition
representatives of youth, labor, educa-
tional, civic, business and social serv- Prof. Palmer Christian. University
ice organizations. organist, will present his 15th an-
Youth Problem nual Good Friday organ recital at
A research committee recently em- 4:15 p.m. today in Hill Auditorium.
ployed by the Rockefeller Institute to A
investigate the youth situation found A former student of Dickinson,
that, "A youth problem definitely ex- Schreck, Straube and Guilmant, Pro-
ists in the United States," Miss Wil- fessor Christian has appeared as solo-
liams declared. More than 50 per ist with such noted orchestras as the,
cent of the youths in this country New York Philharmonic and the Chi-
don't go beyond the ninth grade, while I
1,000,000 are no-t in school at all, she
asserted. Seventy nine per cent don't phonies as well as serving as Munici-
have access to recreational facilities, pal Organist in Denver, Colo.
she added. Scheduled to be heard on his pro-
It is urgent, Miss Williams stressed, gram of religious music is Malling's
that pressure in the form of telegrams, "Golgatha," Bossi's "Hour of Con-
letters, cards and petitions be sent secration" and "Jesus meets His
to our Congressmen to pass this act, Mother" (Stations of the Cross) and
especially in view of the proposed "Crucifion (Passion Symphony) by
ts. Last year 4,000,000 youthsj Dupre.
were helped by the NYA with an av- He will also play Frescobaldi's "Toc-
erage wage of $12.87 per month. Next cata per l'Elevazione," "Prologus Tra-
year this fund, if reduced by more gicus" by Karg-Elert, the Good Fri-
than 12 per cent, will be spread even day Music from Wagner's opera
thinner, she warned. Mail is meas- "Parsifal" and two of Bach's Choral
ured in pounds and by volume, Miss Preludes, "O Sacred Head Once
Williams pointed out, so every little Wounded" and "When on the Cross
piece of mail counts. the Saviour Hung."
Prof. Polloek Condemns Abuses
In Voting System, Urges Cure

To Announce
Junior Case
Club Decision
Final decisions on the Law School
Junior Case Club case yesterday and
the one which will be argued at 3
p.m. today in Hutchins Hall, will be
withheld until either late today or#
early tomorrow, John Pickering, '40L,I
senior Case Club adviser, said yes-
terday.
Eight Law School juniors are ar-
guing in the semi-finals and from
these will be chosen the five best,1
in the opinion of a three-man faculty
bench. consisting of Professors Paul

guests of students and members of
the faculty of the School of Business
Administration.
The visiting students are taking
their fifth annual Spring Vacation
Tour and will stop here on their way
from Detroit back to Colorado. Lun-
cheon in the Union will follow a tour
of the campus, which will feature
steps at the Law School, the stadium,
the Rackham Building and the In-
tramural Sports Building, Dean C. E.
Griffin of the business administration
school said yesterday.

Colorado Students
To Gu( ests Here
More than 100 students from the
University of Colorado School 3 Busi-
ness will be here tomorrow as the

I

Pathologists Attend Meets
Ini Pittsburgh This Week
Medical school pathologists will at-
tend meetings this week in Pitts-
burgh of the American Association
of Pathologists and Bacteriologists,
the American-Canadian Section of
the International Association of
Medical Museums and the Ameri-
can Association for Cancer Research.
Those making the trip to Pitts-
burgh are Dr. Carl V. Weller, Dr.
Ruth Wanstrom, and Dr. Lloyd Ca-
tron, all members of the Department
of Pathology in the Medical School.
Dr. Weller is president of the Amer-
ican Association of Pathologists and
Bacteriologists this year.

I -

B
E
E

CHAMPAGNE
The BEER VAULT
303 North 5th Avenve
Dial 8200
For Delivery,- 9 A.M. to Midnite

W
N
IE

American democracy is seriously
handicapped by the use of "bedsheet
ballots," made necessary by a multi-
plicity of candidates, Prof. James K.
Pollock, of the political science de-
partment, asserted in a report made
public recently.
Professor Pollock said "bedsheet
ballots" have caused thousands of
voters to ignore candidates for minor
offices and thus have enabled poor
and unqualified men to filter into
political jobs by default.
"The shortening of the ballot,
which means the simplification of
the voter's task, seems to be an in-
dispensable and urgent reform to
restore the control of the govern-
ment to the people," he said.
Professor Pollock also reported
that:
In Detroit four years ago 160,000
voters did not vote for candidates
to the State Legislature, although
they did vote for higher offices.
During the same selection Michi-
gan voters cast 156,000 fewer votes
for Congressman than for Governor.
Illinois cast 300,000 fewer votes
in 1932 for the office of Supreme
Court clerk than for the presidential
candidate.
"Fatigue curves" among voters-
with the fatigue increasing propor-
tionately to the size of the ballot-
were displayed by Professor Pollock.
"In Michigan two out of every sev-
en who vote for governor in the pri-
maries will manage to last out the
difficult ordeal of marking their bal-
lots and registering their votes for
the last office on the ticket," he said.
"Or, to put it another way, four out
of every five persons who vote for

U. S. Senator in a primary do not
vote for the offices lower down on
the ballot.
"Over the whole period of the
direct primary in Michigan, approx-
imately twice as many votes have
been cast for the office of Governor
as for the office of Sheriff. These
and similar facts could be adduced
to show the dismal result of asking
the voter to assume a burden greater
than he can bear."
Water Safety
Course Planned
Red Cross Is Sponsoring
Instructor's Visit

Leidy, John Dawson and Russell
Smith, Pickering explained.
The case being argued, which is
open to the public, involves a ques-
tion of labor law in which an employ-
er protests the picketing of his res-
taurant by members of a minority
union, when the certified majority
union is in agreement with the em-
ployer.
Yesterday, a team composed of
John Cummiskey and Paul Roesch
argued in this case against Robert
Kneeland and Eugene Calder. The
case today will be argued by Philip
Buchen and Kenneth Lau, and ;They
will be opposed by Charles Johnson
and Alan Johnston.
Decisions of the judges as to which
five are the best will not be affected
by the legal stand any of them may
take in the case. Of the five, the
best four will argue in the coming
Case Club finals on April 19, Foun-
der's Day. All five will be senior
advisers for the Case Club next year.
Pre-Med Club
Takes Petitions
Nominees Must Procure
Names Of Ten Members
Announcement was made at the
last meeting of the Pre-Medical Soci-
ety of the University that petitions for
club offices will be received any time
until Tuesday.
Petitions must be signed by at least
10 members and may be given to
David Newburg, '40, or Thomas Aye,
'40. Seniors and juniors may run
for president and publicity agent;
anyone may run for the other offices.
Committee chairmen have been ap-
pointed to correct and improve the
constitution of the club which seeks
its membership from among those
undergraduates who intend to study
medicine.
The next meeting of the club will
be held Wednesday, 8.:15 p.m., in
the East Amphitheatre of the West
1Medical Building.

f


TvN IG HT"..
the curtoin rises on
thq enttie('e~p/le

Il

by IRWIN SHAW
Ihis play is a fairy tale with a moral. In it justice
triumphs and the meek prove victorious over arro-
gant and violent men. The author does not pretend
that this is the case in real life."
'resented by the
TONILLaauaEL PMLAYERS
at
4~d ia teft4e/44oh 7Aeatpe
TONIGHT and Saturday, March 22 and 23

....

Tickets - 50C

Curtain 8:30

rig

ANNOUNCING
THE ANN ARBOR PREMIERE
FRIDAY, MARCH 29th - APRIL 4th
GONE WITH THE WIND
This production wi not be s own anywhere except at advanced
pri ce....at east until 1941
YOU WIfL SEE IT HERE EXACTLY AS IT WAS
PRESENTED AT TIlE ATIANTA PREMIERE.
MAIL ORDERS ACCEPTED NOW
Enclose self-addressed stamped envelope with check or money
order payable to MAJESTIC THEATRE and specify date you wish
to attend. (NO TELEPHONE RESERVATIONS.)
SUNDAY MATINEE
EVENINGS AT 7:30 P.M. 2:00APM.
ALL EATSRESEVED2:00 P.M.
ALL SEATS RESERVED ALL SEATS RESERVED
1.10 $X1.10
(including tax) (including tax)
Two Matinees Daily - 10:15 A.M. - 2:15 P.M.
No Seats Reserved -- Admission 75c
MAJESTIC l- STARTS MARCH 29th

i
t

William C. Lucey, first aid life
saving representative for the mid-
western branch of the American Red
Cross, St. Louis, will offer a Red
Cross Water Safety Instructor's
Course from 7 p.m. to 10 p.m. April
16, 22, 29 and May 6 in the pool of
the Intramural Building, Red Cross
authorities announced yesterday.
Prerequisite for this new course is
the Red Cross Senior Life Saving
and Water Safety Course. Students
expecting to take instruction should
supply themselves with two textbooks
in advance, "Life Saving and Water
Safety" and "Swimming and Diving."
Further information about the
course can be secured by calling Red
Cross office at 2-1647 at any time
between 9 a.m. to noon and 1 p.m. to
5 p.m. except Saturday afternoons.
Mr. Lucey has been with the Red
Cross for four years and has had his
sphere of activities in Illinois and
Southern Michigan. His duties are
to standardize life saving and first
aid in chapters all over the two
states.
Among the positions he holds on
the Red Cross roster are assistant
director in charge of Michigan Red
Cross aquatic schools and instructor
of leadership training programs.

z

h.

Li

t

MICHIGAN

NOW SHOWING!

Course Studies
Social Relation
Of Engineering
Fundamental concepts affectingt
the relation of the individual and
engineer to the community and the
relation of engineering to business
form the general basis of study in
an unique course conducted by Prof.
John S. Worley of the transportation
engineering department.
Listed in the official bulletin of
announcements for the engineering
college as "Contracts, Specifications
and Engineering Relations," the
course supplements the study of pro-
fessional relationships with a general
and informal analysis of the more
elementary and fundamental con-l
cepts and ideals touching the con-
duct of the individual in society.
The prime objective behind the
first six weeks of the course, accord-
ing to Professor Worley, is to arrange,
and define the fundamental concepts
which we use daily, and further toj
clear distorted views and ideals in
the minds of students.
Attacked and analyzed are such
pertinent terms and expressions ast
"education," "character," and "per-
sonality," with special emphasis ont
the meaning of these terms and the
importance of their influence on
the individual.
Upon these concepts and princi-
ples of conduct analyzed in the first
part of the course are based the un-
derlying reasons for professional
codes and ethics. It is pointed out
that all professionad codes are fun-
damentally based upon the previous
unfortunate experiences of members
of that profession with society.
TYPEWRITING

For Lessing

Dyettscher

Play

S
f ,
i
,
u
1
2
A

Verein

CHOCOLATES
for EASTER
The Sampler is the finest
box of candy in America.
$1.50 for the 17-oz. size.
Other packages, 25c up.
Easter Eggs a . . at lOc up
Cak"is-Fletcher
Drug Stores

TI ese round trip p -res are for
ea0p person in group of 25 or more

Chooses Final Cast

- The cast for the German play,
"Minna von Barnhelm," which will
be given April 29 by the Deutcher
Verein was announced yesterday by
Dr. Otto G. Graf, director of the
production.
Kenneth B. Marble, '41, has the
leading role. He will be supported by
Ethel Winnai, '41, Betty C. Ramsay,
Grad., William M. Todd, Howard
Wallach, '43, David M. Gibson, '41,
J. Stanhope Edwards, Grad., Carl
Petersen, '40, Gordon R. Avery, '41,
Alexander G. Miller, '408M.
Graf described this comedy by Les-
sing as one of the most famous in
German literary history. Its setting
is 18th century Berlin at the end of
the Seven Years War.

NEW YORK
BUFFALO. .

Chicago
Rochester
Pittsburgh

$5.50
9.00
6.95

Washington D.C.
St. Louis, Mo. ... .
Milwaukee ......

$17.30
12.70
7.75

. . s
" 0 "

$15.50
0 6,675

Eastern Mich. Bus Depot Michigan Union Travel Bureau
LtW West Huon St. Michigan Union
Phone 4269 Phone 2-4431
- RE Y N 0 4,- _"-'-"'-
~ CREYOUN~ i~e:_-

818 S. State

324 S. State

J

GOOD FRIDAY MATINEE AT 3 P.M.

EVENING SHOWS
TAT 7-9 P.M.

t Aft i A ff--, 4- ft E% M, r t ft tJ%

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