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March 13, 1940 - Image 2

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1940-03-13

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PAGE TWO

TIE MICHIGAN DAILY

WEDNESD~AYMARCIn 13, 19

H Somer ShnZ
To Talk Here
On Vegetation
Arts Acadermy Sponsors
Forestry Division Head
in University Lecture
Homer L. Shantz, in a University
lecture sponsored by the Michigan
Academy of Science, Arts and Letters,
will discuss "Vegetation, What It
Means," at 4:15 p.m. Friday in Natur-
al Science Auditorium.
Shantz, head of the Division of
Wild Life Management in the Na-
tional Forest Service since 1936, served
previously as investigator with the
Bureau of Plant Industry of the De-
partment of Agriculture.
Famed chiefly as an expert botan-
ist and zoologist Shantz has traveled
in that capacity throughout North
and South America as well as Africa.
The research conducted,in his trav-
els, especially in East Africa, are
considered basic to a study of botany
and zoology in those regions.
Shantz is the author of numerous
publications dealing with plant phys-I
iology and with natural vegetation.
He especially interested himself in
the value of natural vegetation as an
indication of the agricultural capa-
bilities of land.
Born in Michigan, he studied at
Colorado College and the University
of Nebraska. He has taught at Colo-
rado College, the University of Ne-
braska, the University of Missouri,
the University of Louisiana, the Uni-
versity of Illinois and Clark Universi-
ty. He is a former president of the
University of Arizona.

Der Fuehrer Visits Wounded Soldiers

DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN

-

WEDNESDAY, MARCH 13, 1940 t
VOL. L. No. 117 1
Notices
To All Faculty Members:
1. Life Annuities or life insuranceI
either or both may be purchased by_
members' of the faculties from the
Teachers Insurance and Annuity As-
sociation of America and premiums
for either life Annuity or life Insur-
ance, or both, may be deducated at
the written request of the policy-
holder from the monthly payroll of
the University, and in such cases will
be remitted directly by the Univer-
sity, on the monthly basis. Ther
secretary's office has on file blank
applications for annuity policies, or
life insurance policies, and rate books,;
for the convenience of members of
the University staff desiring to make'
use of them.
2. The Regents at their meeting of,
January, 1919 agreed that any mem-
ber of the Faculties entering the serv-
ice of the University since Nov. 17,
1915, may purchase an Annuity from
the above-named Association, toward
the cost of which the Regents would
make an equal contribution up to
five per cent of his annual salary
not in excess of $5,000, thus, within
the limit of five per cent of the salary,
doubling the amount of the Annuity
purchased.
3. The purchase of an Annuity
under the conditions mentioned in
(2) above is made a condition of em-.
ployment in the case of all members
of the Faculties, except instructors,
whose term of Faculty service does
not antedate the University year
1919-1920. With instructors of less
than three years' standing the pur-
chase of an Annuity is optional.
4. Persons who have becortie mem-
bers of the faculties since Nov. 17,
1915 and previous to the year 1919-
1920 have the option of purchasing
annuities under the University's con-
tributory plan.
5. Any person in the employ of the
University may at his own cost pur-
chase annuities from the association
or any of the class of faculty mem-
bers mentioned above may purchase
annuities at his own cost in addition
to those mentioned above. The Uni-
versity itself, however, will contribute
Gray To Speak Here
Harald S. Gray, nationally known
as a leader in the cooperative move-
ment and as a conscientious objector
during the World War, will speak
on "Facing Conscription" at 8:30
p.m. Sunday in the Union.

to the expense of such purchase of
annuities only as indicated in sections
2, 3 and 4 above.
6. Any person in the employ of the
University, either as a faculty mem-
ber or otherwise, unless debarred by
his medical examination may, at his,
own expense, purchase life insurance
from the Teachers Insurance and An-1
nuity Association at its rate. All life
insurance premiums are borne by the
individual himself. The University
makes no contribution toward life
insurance and has nothing to do with
the life insurance feature except that
it will if desired by the insured, de-'
duct premiums monthly and remit
the same to the association.
7. The University accounting of-
fices will as a matter of accommoda-
tion to members of the faculties or
employes of the University, who de-
sire to pay either annuity premiums
or insurance premiums monthly, de-
duct such premiums. from the pay-
roll in monthly installments. In the
case of the so-called "academic roll"
months of July, August, September,
and October will be deducted from
the double payroll of June 30r. While
the accounting offices do not solicit
this work, still it will be cheerfully
assumed where desired.
8. The University has no ar-
rangements with any insurance or-
ganization except the Teachers In-
surance and Annuity Association of
America and contributions will not
be made by the University nor can
premium payments be deducted ex-
cept in the case of annuity or insur-
ance policies of this association.
9. The general administration of
the annuity and insurance business
has been placed in the hands of Sec-
retary of the University by the Re-
gents.
Please communicate with the un-
dersigned if you have not complied
Prof. R. Briggs Edits
Conference Proceedings

with the specific requirements as
stated in (3) above.
Herbert G. Watkins, Ass't Secy.
Faculty of the College of Literature,
Science, and the Arts: The five-week
freshman reports will be due Satur-
day, March 16, in the Academic
Counselors' Office, 108 Mason Hall.
Arthur Van Duren
Mentor Reports: Reports on stand-
ings of all Engineering freshmen will
be expected from faculty members,
during the 6th and again during the
12th weeks of the semester. These
two reports will be due about March
22 and May 3. Report blanks will be
furnished by campus mail. Please re-
fer routine questions to Jane Roll-
man, Dean's Office (Extension 575).
who will handle the reports; other-
wise, call Prof. A. D. Moore, Head
Mentor, Extension 2136.
Senior Women: All those who have
not yet procured their caps and gowns
may do so this afternoon. The caps
and gowns will be found in Miss Mc-
Cormick's office in the League and
can be purchased betwen 1 and 5.
Physical Education Candidates:
Candidates interested in taking Civil'
Service examinations on April 6, 1940

for the positions of Institution Recre-
ation Instructor B (supervising play-
ground activities of patients, teach-
ing sports, etc.), Institution Recrea-
tion Instructor A2 (director of recre-
tion), and Institution Recreation In-
structor Al (director of extensive
recreation program), must file appli-
cations and fees of $1.00 at the State
Civil Service Commission office no
later than March 23. Minimum eri-
trance requirements:
For ppsition B: Men and. women
21 years of age. Two years college
training with specialization in physi-
cal education.
For position A2: Men and women
22 years of age. One year of experi-
ence as teacher or director of physi-
cal education, Completion of two
years college training with specializa-
tion in physical education.
For position Al: Men and women
23 years of age. One year of experi-
ence as teacher or director of physi-
cal education. Completion of four
year teacher-training course in phys-
ical education.
Further information may be ob-
tained at the University Bureau of
Appointments and Occupational In-
formation, 201 1Viason Hall.
The University Bureau of Appoint-
(Continued on Page 4)

.A

,: :.
n
E(~

PROF. TELEQUIZ says:

Dr. F.
O n

B. Cirby To Speak
Cascara Tomorrow

Fuehrer Adolf Hitler (right foreground), his hands clasped, is shown
as he visited in Berlin with a group of soldiers wounded in the present
war. Wheel chairs are lined up near the Unknown Soldier's memorial.
Earlier Hitler had sounded a war cry of "on to victory" in a brief ad-
dress to observe Germany's Memorial Day. This photo was radioed
from Berlin to New York.

Sponsored by the Apothecaries Club
of the pharmacy school, Dr. Frank
B. Cirby, director of education for
Abbott Laboratory of Chicago, will
deliver a lecture on cascara at 7:30
p.m. tomorrow in Room 151 of the
Chemistry Building.
The lecture will be illustrated by
films of the cascara country showing,
the environment from which the
drug is taken. The public is invited
is taken.

Al-Thaqafa Elects Officers
Ismail Khalidi, Grad., was elected
the first president of Al-Thaqafa,
Arabic culture society, at a meeting
held yesterday at the Union. Other
officers elected were: Constance
Bryan, '40, secretary, and William
Hazam, Grad., treasurer.

IASU Announces Sale
Of 'Challenge' Today
The sale of the second issue of the
American Student Union's monthly
magazine, "The Challenge," which
was delayed because of printing diffi-
culties, will begin today, June Har-
ris, '40, chairman of the publications
commission, announced yesterday.
An essay, by Robert Pincus, '40E,
on, "The American Press, or a Study.
in Humor"; an article on youth or-
ganizations for peace centering
around the ASU and AYC conven-
tions, by Elliottt Maraniss, '40, and
an essay by Robert Speckhard, '42,
on "The CIO Legislative Program,"
will be the highlights of this issue,
Miss Harris said.

Now"

Pens -- Typewriters - Supplies
"Writers Trade With Rider's"
RIDER'S
302 South State Slt.

"Proceedings of the Fifteenth An-
nual Michigan Accounting Confer-
ence," edited by Prof. R. P. Briggs of
the economics department, was re-
cently published as number seven on
the Michigan Business Papers of the
Bureau of Business Research.
The publication includes accounts
of two roundtable discussions on
"Practical Auditing Procedures for
Inventories and Receivables" and
"Some Problems of Governmental
Accounting." State Auditor-General
Vernon H. Brown contributed a re-
print of his, speech on "Effects of
Changing State Relationships.".

ANSWER: Yes, all day
every night after 7

every Sunday as well as
o'clock.

QUESTION:
Sundays?

Are long distance rates reduced

1"

I

With reduced rates in effect nights and Sundays on
calls to most points, you can keep in touch with home
and friends easily and economically by telephone.
Rates to points not shown below will be found on page
5 of the telephone directory, or can be obtained from
"Long Distance" (dial 0).
RATES FOR THREE-MINUTE NIGHT AND
SUNDAY STATION-TO-STATION CALLS

CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING

I

ANN ARBOR to:

I

I

THE MICHIGAN DAILY
CLASSIFIED
ADVERTISING
RATES
Effective as of February 14, 1939
12c per reading line (in basis of
five average words to line) for one
or two insertions.
10c per reading line for three or
more insertions.
Minimum of 3 lines per inser-
tion.
These low rates are on the basis
of cash payment before the ad is
inserted. If it is inconvenient for
you to call at our offices to make
payment, a messenger will be sent
to pick up your ad at a slight extra
charge of 15c.
For further information call
23-24-1, or stop at 420 Maynard
Street.
FOR RENT
403 W. MADISON: Two-room fur-
nished apartment. Gas, lights, wa-
ter, linen, dishes, silo r. Private
front entrance. Warm, clean, light.
$7 per week. Phone 6279. 319
LAUNDERING--9
LAUNDRY - 2-1044. Sox darned.
Careful work at low prices. 16

TRANSPORTATION -21
WASHED SAND AND GRAVEL -
Driveway gravel, washed pebbles.
Killins Gravel Company. Phone
7112. 13
HELP WANTED
SALESMAN EXPERIENCED: Na-
tionally known confection manu-
facturer has a territory open. The.
man we want to fill this position
as our representative is now em-
ployed, is approximately 25 years
old, but is not satisfied with his
opportunity for future advance-
ment. Must have at least a high
school education, fine personality,
initiative, and natural enthusiasm.
He is not afraid of work and can
think for himself. Straight 4alary
and expenses with advancement as
results are shown. Give experience
and qualifications, phone, and en-
close recent snapshot. Write Box
9, Mich. Daily. 326
TYPING-18
TYPING-Experienced. Miss Allen,
408 S. Fifth Ave. Phone 2-2935 or
2-1416. 34
WANTED - TO BUY-- 4
HIGHEST CASH PRICE paid for
your discarded wearing apparel,
Claude Brown, 512 S. Main Street.
146

STRAYED, LOST, FOUND --1
LOST-Diamond wrist watch. Black
band. Call Agnes Craw. Reward
offered. Ph. 2-4514. 325
THETA CHI Fraternity Pin lost.
Name on back. Reward! M. S.
Cheever, 1351 Washtenaw, Phone
2-3236. 34
LOST-Red purse containing large
sum of money-near Glenn-Ann
Shop. Liberal rewaid. Phone 8598.
321
LOST: Men's gold Waltham watch.
Lost between Madison St. and W.
Engineering Bldg. Reward. Call
2-1717. 318
WANTED-TO RENT-6
WANTED TO RENT: Storeroom
near Campus for small eating
place. Write Box 3, Daily. 317

Alpena..........
Battle Creek..... .
Bay City ...
Buffalo, N.Y.
Cadillac .- . ..
Chicago, Ill.......
Coldwater
Columbus, 0..
Flint ....... .

$ .60+
.35
.35
.60

Grand Rapids.
Hou ghton
Lapeer........
Louisville, Ky. ..

.55 Marquette ...-...
.55 Minneapolis, Minn.
.35 Muskegon.....
.45 Philadelphia, Pa,
.35 Traverse City .....

4

On a call for which the
charge is SOc or more,
a federal tax applies.

$ .40
.95
.35
.70
.85
1100
.50
.90
.60

MICHIGAN BELL TELEPHONE (

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Shows Daily at 2 - 4 - 7 - 9 P.M.

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Today and
Thursday -

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