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March 09, 1940 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1940-03-09

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Union's Coke
Bar Scheduled
ForTuesday
To Hold Student, Faculty
Bridge Tourney Mar. 23;
Debates To Start Soon
Union student offices, in a state
of semi-stagnation during the past
week after strenuous work on the
Union Opera, are again swinging into
their customary activity level with'nu-
merous projects slated for the com-
ing week.
Notable among these is the newly
organized Coke Bar, which, under
Doug Gould, '41, has proved its pop-
ularity in the first two presenta-
tions. Given on Tuesday afternoons,
the bar offers a variety program of
entertainment, dancing and refresh-
ments. The success of last week's
JGP preview has prompted Gould to
offer a return of the show-stopping
"Eleanor Hop" given in the Opera
by Jim Neilson and Jack Sillcott.
Special guests for Tuesday's event
will be Sigma Alpha Epsilon frater-
nity and Helen Newberry Dormitory.
. A feature of the occasion is a rtld
bar on wheels from which soft drinks
are distributed. The consumatory
powers of last week's 200 guests in-
dicated the necessity for an even
larger supply of refreshments, Gould
Said.
A rematch of the first student-
faculty bridge tournament will b
held March 23 instead of March 16,
as was formerly announced, accord-
ing to Harold Singer, '41. The fac-
ulty will be the guests of the Union
executive staff for this second meet,
the University Club having played
host for the first one. As this is a
rematch, Singer said, most of the
teams will be the same. However,
if the idea is continued in the fu-
ture, interested students may apply
for positios in the contest.
Singer, also in charge of ticket
exchanges for the Union, pointed out
that while collections had been pro-
eeding, some $30 in cash from re-
sale of last fall's football tickets still
remained uncalled for.
Plans for intramural debates on
the topic of the relative hardiness of
past and present Michigan men, to
start next Sunday, are near comple-
tion. The idea of the debate is to
come to some conclusion as to whe-
ther long years of coeducational
education have debilitated the glory
of the days when "men were men."
YES SiR,
T'his Is Worth
Srniing About
Take the very best of ingredi-
ents, and the finest cooking in
town, results in the most de-
licious meal you've had in many
a day. Drop in today if you
don't believe us.
-INES

Bottled or Draught
BEER

Ri nii l Troops Moving In On Beleaguered Viipuri
.RALRQADS NUIJAMAA
MIGHWAYSAA TREA
SIMOLA
KAVANTSAARI
NUR MI
GRAD N
- P(,R(VIB RG) HIJK
LIMATTA HIJK
HEINLAHTI SAN
_ _ _ VI?_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _
r fTRANGSUND ~
K AMA RA
MU HU LA H TIKAISL A HTITO EIN/GRA D
O 5 10
s +1MILES
Bitter fighting, described by Finnish military men as the bloodiest of the war, raged across frozen Viipuri
Bay as the Soviet troops sent waves of men toward the beleaguered city. The Finns claimed that their lines
held, however. This Associated Press map shows the movements of the invaders, who claim to have established
themselves on the west bank of Viipuri Bay near Vila joki. A second column drove toward the city's back
door. East of the city, the Red drive took on a wheeling motion intended to isolate the city.

Parts In Film
Of Ann Arbor
Will Be Cast
All Persons At Meeting
Are Assured Of A Part;
Will ShowCampus
University students who are inter-
ested in dramatics and wish to
try out for parts in the all-Ann
Arbor film, "We'x e in the Movies,"
sponsored by the Junior Chamber of
Commerce, are invited to attend a
casting meeting at 2 p.m. tomorrow
in the Chamber of Commerce build-'
ing, 201 E. Ann.
All persons present at the meeting
will be assured of one part or another
in the movie, according to F.C. Mose-
ley, general chairman.
Campus Shots
Scenes for the movie will be shot
on campus, in various business estab-
lishments and at other places of in-
terest in and about Ann Arbor. When
finished the picture will run for about
one hour and 45 minutes and will be
partly in color.
The premiere will be held in true
Hollywood style April 1, with a second
performance the following day. As
the movie will be the property of the
Junior Chamber of Commerce, it will
be available thereafter to University
and civic groups for other presenta-
tions.
Rogers To Produce
The film is to be produced by the
John B. Rogers Producing Company
of Fostoria, Ohio. The director,
whose flame has not yet been an-
nounced, is scheduled to arrive here
this afternoon.
Elect Officers
TQ New Hillel
House Cabinet

International Center Will Hold
Educational Problems Parley

The first of two conferences on
international education sponsored by
the International Center will be he'd
at 2 p.m. today at the Center with
sixteen students who have been mem-
bers of 'foreign faculties convening
to discuss common problems.
All students now at the Univer-
sity, the conferees were once at uni-
versities throughout the world. To-
day, they will confine their meeting
principally to the, exchange of in-
formation about their schools and
about future plans in education.
The meeting will be presided over
by Dean James B. Edmonson of the,
education school. Only those spe'
cially interested in comparative edu-
cation will attend. At next week's
meeting, the effect of the current
world situation on education will be
discussed.
At 7 p.m. Sunday, Prof. Lawrence
Preuss of the political 'science de-
partment will discuss "International
lMaritime Law in the Present War"
at the Center.
Interest at the Center next week'

will center upon the visit to the
campus and to the Center especially
of President Walter Wright of Rob-.
ert College of Istanbul and the Is-
tanbul Women's College. He will
confer with foreign students on cam-
pus who were formerly at Robert
College,
He will speak on the ZAnatolian
earthquake in Turkey at the Cen-
ter's Sunday night program next
week.
Prof. J. Raleigh Nelson, director
of the Center and counselor to for-
cign students, said yesterday, that
the University would probably suf-
fer no decrease in foreign enrollment
because of the tuition increase. On-
ly the students who pay their own
way owill be directly hurt, he said.
Many of the foreign students here,
he explained, are on government and
exchange scholarships. He also
pointed out that the University is
getting many more students from
South America and elsewhere this
year because of the shutdown of
European colleges.

U U

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I

Ill1ness Takes
Sharp Upturn'
During Spring
By RICIARD HARMEL
With drizzling rains and an up-
ward swing in the thermometer her-
alding the approach of spring, stu-
Jents the campus over cast away
their overcoats in joy . . . and let the
colds come trooping in.
With colds in recent years show-
ing a sharp upswing in celebration
of spring, Dr. A. C. Furstenberg,
dean of the medical school, and Dr.
W. F. Forsythe, director of the
Health Service, have collborated in
preparing a University poster de-
signed to warn students about the
prevention andl cure of colds.
Contrary to common belief, the
doctors say, there is no specific cure
for head colds. If you really want
to get rid of that uncomfortable
sniffle and drippy nose, make a bee
line for bed and stay there until
complete recovery.
But if you are a hardy soul and
find that your studies and professors
would be just too disappointed if
you failed to show up, you hop right
over to the Health Service, consult
a doctor and wheel home your cart
full of medication.
The filterable virus responsible for
colds, the doctors declare, remains
suspended in room air for hours and
is a frequent cause of infection. So-
if you value the health of your fellow
human beings, equip yourself with
a campaign kit of cheese cloth or
tissue for nose blowing which can
be destroyed at the first opportunity
by burning.
Of course, if you cannot find your
way clear to rest in bed, force your-
self to drink and drink, the doctors
advise. Drink at least a gallon of
fluid per hour, preferably water or
lemonade, not beer.
If you really want to cure your-
self, keep your body in rooms of con-
stant temperature. The doctors say
to take sponge baths . . . to sleep in
cool (not frigid) well-ventilated
rooms . .. and make an unbreakable
vow not to shampoo your hair.
Fraternity Gives Banquet
Phi Delta Kappa, 'honorary edu,
cation fraternity, will hold its fellow-
ship luncheon at 1:15 p.m. today in
the Union. Reports of the biennial
meeting of the National Council of
Phi Delta Kappa will be given by
Clyde Vroman, Grad., president of
the local chapter.

Butler, Bullard
Win Law Case
Get Vote Of Case Club
Judges On All Counts
Harold W. Butler and Willis/ C.
Bullard won a decision in the Fresh-
man Case Club finals yesterday, for
which feat they each receive a three-
year subscription to the Michigan
Law Review.
Butler and Bullard were partners
representing the defendant in a fic-
titious case in which the plaintiff
builds a house on a lot he does not
own.
The team won on all three counts
-on their oral argument before a
five-man bench, on their legal rea-
soning, and on the brief they had
presented which outlined their le-
gal stand and citations.
Alfred Hewitt and Harry Mayer,
won a decision in the second trial
heard today in the finals, arguing
on the same case. They represented
the plaintiff. They won on two
counts, on the oral argument and
on their brief.
Group Will Discuss
Fede'raVl Union Plans
A nmovement to stinmulate local
interest in a federal union of na-
tions will be inaugurated by a group
meeting today in the office of Dr.
Fred G. Stevenson of the University
Extension Service to form a Federal
Union Committee.
Prof. William W. Sleator of the
physics department and Dr. Francis
Skillman Onderdonk, formerly of the
architecture school, will attend the
meeting.
According to Dr. Stevenson, the
purpose of the committee will be
to arouse community interest in the
plan for solving interhiational prob-
lems as outlined by Clarence Streit
in his book "Union Now", and also
to cooperate with similar committees
in other cities.

Band To Be Led
At Spring Concert
By Morton Gould'
Morton Gouid, prominent young
American composer of symphonic
music, will act as guest conductor
of the University Band at its Annual
Spring Concert March 28 in Hill
Auditorium.
Highlighting Mr. Gould's appear-
ance as guest conductor will be the
first playing of his most recent com-
position, "Cowboy Rhapsody." He
is also the composer of "Pavanne"
from the Second American Sympho-
nette, rearranged and popularized
last spring.
Mr. Gould is widely considered as
foremost among modern American
composers of symphony music. His
works have brought him acclaim
from music critics all over the United
States. Though much of what he has
written has been for orchestras, it
has been arranged for presentation
by the band.
DAILY OFFICIAL
i BULLETN
I .

Yo'll Have a Whale of a Good
+C/.

<

wWV

I

(Contliued
ard K Parr will
on "What Do
Christ?"

from Page 4)
speak to the group
We Believe About

Jerome Mecklenberger, '40, James
Frankel, '41, and Ruth Pollock, '40,
were elected president, vice-president
and secretary respectively of the Hill-
el Fraternity Cabinet, it was announ-
ced yesterday.
The Cabinet, which has been
formed to discuss problems relating
to interfraternity affairs and rela-
tions between the organized houses
and the Foundation, comprises repre-
sentatives from the various affiliated
campus Jewish groups and the Hillel
Council. Philip B. Ostrow, '40, and
Anita Newblatt, '41, will serve with
the elected officers on the executive
board.
Wai..vE TI
ONLY TH
FREEZES SI

Time at This Year's
o,10MARCH 13, 14 !, 15, 16

Lydia Mendelssohn Theater
I IT EOLKSi

First Methodist Church: Morning
Worship Service at 10:40 a.m. Dr. C.
W. Brashares will preach on "Why
Christ?"
Stalker Hall: Student Class at 9:45
a.m. at Stalker Hall. Subject for dis-
cu ion: "The Religious Man in the
Modern World." Wesleyan Guild
meeting beginning with supper at 6
p.m. at the Methodist Church. The
four discussion groups on "Peace,"
"Racial Discrimination," "Labor and
Industrial Problems," and "After Col-
lege, Then What?" will hold their last
meeting beginning at 6:45 p.m. fol-
lowing the supper.

RE SOTEERS!
E MODERN GAS REFRIGERATOR
LENTLY WITH NO MOVING PARTS

f

THE

FLAUTZ CAFE
12 2 W. Wash. - On the Corner

OFP T OAOV -M T WEEIE AND FORGOT 'Al
'DISCONNECT 1'IIE ELECIRIC "1EA
'E~T LE. WHEN WE COME HOME
i41E KEitTL E 14AS4DISCOA(NIECTED.
ITtMELFANEDA BT LUCK<Y FOR US rIT7
POP- OJT PLUG is
GRANiD 1DEA.IiIERE
ISN'T ANCOTH-ER 'fEA
K~frLF LIKE IT
INAERICA

We close every Monday.

.1

) UT of the kitchens of thou-
sands of homes every year
come old, worn-out automatic
refrigerators ; . into them go
new ones,; and every year, more
and more of them are Servels.
Folks are turning to gas refrig-
eration for permanent silence,
continued low operating cost...
and in searching the market,
they've found only one place to
get these things.
Servel Electrolux.;: because
its freezing system alone has no
moving parts. That's right. It's
different from all, others!
Replacing yours ? Buying your
first? Make it a Servel'This is a
good time to. see the new 1940
models we have on display. We'll
gladly give you details
* No Moving Parts to wear In its
freezinggsystem
" Permanent Silence
" Continued Low Operating Cost
* More Years of Carefree Service
" Savings that Pay for It
" New Conveniences, New Beauty

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The Ann Arbor Savings and Commercial Bank is prepared
to give you the utmost in modern banking service. Checking
facilities are familiar to all - others lare even more important.
For instance, keeping valuables in convenient safe deposit
boxes is the one way to insure peace of mind and security for
such possessions. An inquiry at the bank will surprise you with
the low cost and practicability of assuring yourself of such

I

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AND BESIDES. .. THE 1940 SERVL ELECTROLUX IS
ADAPTABLE TO EVERY NEED

.5 MC
I'

11ST COLD-
DRY COLD

i.

protection. There is no obligation, of course.

LU

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