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March 07, 1940 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1940-03-07

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE 3MICHIGAN )OXILY_______

Queer Antics Of Link Trainer
Gives Students Feet' Of Flying

Wayne County Sheriff Is Arrested

behave. He fixes it so it will only
turn around. Your object, which he
will explain to you via the radio, is
to turn the ship with the aid of the
rudder and stop it in line with a
mark on the wall. This is pretty
easy.
But then he lets the Link have its
inning. "It's up to you now," Mr.1
Setter says through the earphones.
"It will answer to every movement
of the controls that you make."
Using every scrap of information
that you have gleaned from Bill;
Barnes, Flash Gordon or Tailspin
Tommy, you try a right turn. For
this you have to make the rudder'
and the stick cooperate. Probably
you will not and the Link will twist
and squirnm and stick up its nose
again. "Watch it" the voice warns,
"'you're going to stall." Too late.
The nose whips down and the Link
begins to swing around wildly in a
tailspin. You are beaten. You sit
there listless and finally Mr. Setter
comes to the rescue by turning off
the Link.
No doubt the CAA boys have be-
come good enough fliers that they
keep the Link pretty well controlled.+
So that now when a neophyte tries
it, it is like a bronco coming out of
a corral,
Hillel Drama Group
To Present Shaw 's
The Gentle People'
Irwin Shaw's Brooklyn Fable, "The,
Gentle People," will be presented by]
the Hillel Players Group on March
22 and 23 in the Lydia Mendelssohn
Theatre as the major production of
the Foundation.
Presented last season on Broad-
way, "The Gentle People" was well
received by the New York critics be-
ing declared one of the few hits of
the year. $Franchot Tone and Sylvia
Sydney starred in the production.
The play itself deals with poor
weak people who are merely trying to
"get along" in life and their victory
over the racketeer who tries to take
all they have away from them. The
author, whose avowed major purpose
is to portray the life of the meek,
confesses at the end that he wishes
that all could happen in real life as
it does in the story.

Here Is Today's News
In Summary
Voters in Ann Arbor are reminded
by City Clerk Fred C. Perry that
Tuesday will be the last day on which
they may register for the April 1
city election.
Perry's office will be open from 8
a.m. to 5 p.m. every weekday except
Saturday, when it closes at noon, and
Tuesday, when it will remain open
until 8 p.m., for registrations.
To register and vote, a person must
be 21 years of age, a citizen of the
United States, resident of Michigan
for six months and resident of Ann
Arbor and his particular ward for 20
days before election.
* * *
Those shadows you meet on the'
street these days aren't invisible
men, they're members of the Ann
Arbor police force.
They're merely shadows of their
former selves, or will be soon, inas-
much as they have begun a series of
rigorous twice a week hour and a
half gymnasium classes over in Wat-
erman Gymnasium.
When Major Paul Vevia of Grand
Rapids came here to conduct the an-
nual Co. K inspection, Major Walter
Fariss of the military science de-
partment trotted down for dinner
with him and a long visit at the
armory afterward.
The two had not met since serving
together in the World War.

Bruce, Falk Will Lecture
In SpringSeries
Recognizing the importance of its
policy of offering extra-curricular
medical lectures to students as well
as phymen, the School of Medicine
announced yesterday that plans are
being made for two lectures to be
given April 7 and May 7.
Dr. James D. Bruce, director of
post-graduate medicine, will deliver
the April lecture, the medical school
announced. No subject has been
chosen for his address as yet.
Dr. Bruce has served the Univer-
sity in various capacities since 1904
when he became an assistant in the
Department of Internal Medicine. He
has risen steadily in medical school
ranks through director of the De-
partment of Internal Medicine to his
present capacities as chairman of
the division of health sciences and
extra-mural activities.
Dr. Isadore S. Falk, assistant di-
rector of the Social Security Board
in Washington and an emnent bac-
teriologist, will give the May lecture.
Play Tryouts To Be Held
Tryouts for the German play "Min-
na von Barnhelm," will be held 3 to
5 p.m. today and tomorrow in Room
300SW. It is open to all students
interested. Dr. Otto G. Graf is direct-
ing the production.

Sheriff Thomas C. Wilcox (left) of Wayne County, is shown as he
was placed under arrest by Coroner Albert A. Hughes on a charge of
conspiring to protect gambling. Under Michigan law, only a coroner
may arrest a sheriff.
New Method Of Metal Analysis
Developed In Laborator Here

71I

High speed and sensitive chemical
analysis methods for industrial ap-1
plication have been perfected here by;
Prof. Ralph A. Sawyer of the physics
department and Dr. Harvard B. Vin-
cent of the engineering research de-
partment.
Using methods of quantitative
spectral analysis devised here, neces-
sary processes of analysis in chermi-
cal plants have been shortened from
sseveral hours to six minutes, with
equal, if not greater, accuracy. The
research was carried on in the la -
oratories of the physics department
through the department of engineer-
ing research and under the sponsor-
ship of industrial concerns.
The principle underlying all spec-
tral-analysis is the fact that each of
the 92 elements present on the earth
emits, when heated to sufficiently
high temperatures, light of a color
characteristic to that element. When
his light emitted by the element is
resolved into its component colors
or spectral lines by means of a prism,

every element is found to have dis-
tinct lines at definite points on the
spectrum scale.
Thus, if ehe light emitted by an
unknown substance is analyzed by a
spectroscope (or prism), the elements
present in the unknown can be iden-
tified by comparison with known
spectra.

Classified Directory

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY
C CLASSIFIED
ADVERTISING
RATES
Effective as of February 14, 1939
12c per reading line (in basis of
five average words to line) for one
or two insertions.
10c per reading line for three or
more insertions.
Minimum of 3 lines per inser-
t4on.
These low rates are on the basis
of cash payment before the ad is
inserted. If it is inconvenient for
you to call at our offices to make,
payment, a messenger will be sent
to pick up your ad at a slight extra
charge of 15c.
For further information . call
23-24-1, or stop at 420 Maynard
Street.
WANTED-TO BUY-4
HIGHEST CASH PRICE paid for
your discarded wearing apparel.
Claude Brown, 512 S. Main Street.
146
LAUNDERING--9
ACE HAND LAUNDRY-Wants only
one trial to prove we launder your
shirts best. Let our work help you
look neat today. 1114 S. Univer-
sity. 19
LAUNDRY -- 2-1044. Sox darned.
Careful work at low prices. 16
TYPING---18
VIOLA STEIN-Experienced typist
and notary public, excellent work,
706 Oakland, phone 6327. 20
SHOwS AT 2:00 .- 4:20 - 6.45 - 9:10 P.M
LAST TIMES TODAY
25v to 5 p. .
O A RRLL.Z A NUK'S
po c c

TYPING-Experienced. Miss Allen,
408 5. Fifth Ave. Phone 2-2935 or
2-1416. 34
TRANSPORTATION -21
WASHED SAND AND GRAVEL -
Driveway ,gravel, washed pebbles.
Killins Gravel Company. Phone
7112. 13
FOR RENT
WANTED--Student girl to share 2nd
floor suite. Very reasonable. Phone
3366. 311
MISCELLANEOUS -20
SPECIAL-$5.50 Machineless Per-
manent, $2.50; $3 oil cocona, $1.50;
e)d permanent,, $1; Shampoo and
fingerwave, 35c. Phone 8100, 117
M ain. 36
HELP WANTED
WANTED-Chef for Northern Resort
Hotel-July 1-Sept. 10. Salary $150
per month. Write qualifications to
Box 5, Michigan D4.ily. 309

Relatively Simple
Qualitatively, the methods of spec-
tral analysis are relatively simple
and have been employed by chemists,
physicists and astronomers for de-
cades. In quantitatively determining
the constituents of an unknown,
however, the situation becomes more
difficult for, though the intensity of
spectral lines varies with the amount
of the substance present, the relation
of intensity to quantity is not a
direct ratio, and the accurate com-
parison of line intensities is a diffi-
cult task.
Again, it is difficult to determine
the quantity of unknown by com-
parison with. absolute standards,
since such factors as the temperature
of the sample and the sensitivity of
the photographic plate used to record
the spectral lines vary greatly even
in successive tests on the same spec-
troscope using apparently identical
plates.
Made New Method Possible
It is by overcoming these difficul-
ties that Dr. Vincent and Professor
Sawyer .have made possible the pre-
sent high-speed and sensitive meth-
ods of spectral analysis, which are
at present being employed in the pro-
duction scheme of several manufac-
turing plants to determine the con-
stituents of high grade cast iron and
steel.
In the foundries and steel plants
in which the Sawyer-Vincent method
is now in use, samples of metal are
drawn from the vat of molten steel
at half hour intervals and cast into
a form having four pencil-like teeth.
These samples are then rushed to the
spectroscopy laboratory where the
tests are made.
In the laboratory, two prongs of
the sample are broken off and ground
to a point. The sharpened prongs
are then inserted as the terminals
of a high-voltage spark. At the
throw of a switch by the operator, a
potential of 40,000 volts is applied
(Continued on Page .6)

OPENING TONIGHT at 8:30
"IL S EUAGUI0W7
or
'Abduction From The farem",
Presented by Play Production with the School of Music,
Dept. of Physical Education and Little Symphony Orchestra
Thursday, Friday, Saturday, at 8:30 .
Tickets $1.00, 75c, 50C Phone 6300
LYDIA MENDELSSOHN THEATRE

- m ia-- .-

PROF. TELE QUIZ says:

(

L

Now!VOUR GREAT

QUESTION: What's
to Lansing?

the cost of a telephone trip

ANSWER: 45 cents during the day; only 35
cents nights after 7 and any time Sundays,
for a 3-minute Station-to-Station call.
Rates for telephone calls to other points are proportion-
ately low. A telephone trip home or to friends in other
cities is economical. For rates to towns not shown be-
low, see page 5 in the telephone directory or ask "Long
Distance" (dial 0).
RATES FOR THREE-MINUTE NIGHT AND
SUNDAY STATION-TO-STATION CALLS

I

ANN ARBOR to:
Akron, 0. $ .45 Kalamazoo
Alleg an .40 Mfani sice
Atlanta, Ga. ... , 1.10 - Milwaukee, Wis.
Benton Harbor .50 Nashville, Tenn.
Big Rapids .45 New York, N.Y.
Cincinnati, O. .55 Owosso
Dallas, Tex. 1.70 Petoskey .
Flint . -.. ,._.35 Pittsburghh, Pa.
H oluwd ... . .45 Port Huron .:

$ .35
.60
.55
.90
].00
.35
.65
.55
,35

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