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March 06, 1940 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1940-03-06

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

tv Letters

lapac Chosen Unanimously Again
For Cmnference A WlStar Cage Squad

Are Awarded
To Ten Cagers
Coaches Also Announce
Four Reserve Awards
And Yearling Numerals
Coach Bennie Oosterbaan an-
nounced yesterday afternoon that 10
men on the Wolverine basketball
squad will be awarded varsity let-
ters and that four others will receive
reserve awards. At the same time
Coach Ray Fisher announced the
winners of freshman numerals.
The M winners are as follows:
Herb Brogan, '41, Lansing; Bill Cart-
mill, '41, Verona, N. J.; Bob Fitz-
gerald, '42, Kalamazoo; Joe Glasser,
'41, Enid, Oklahoma; Jim Grissen,
'42, Holland; Charles Pink, '40, De-
troit; Capt. Jim Rae, '40, Toledo,
Ohio; George Ruehle, '41, Detroit;
Mike Sofiak, '41, Gary, Ind.; and
Dave Wood, '40, Detroit.
Players who received minor awards
were: Norm Call, '42, Norwalk, Ohio;
Bill Herrmann, '41, Detroit; Don
Holman, '42, Detroit; and Harold
Westerman, '41, Adrian.
Fisher awarded numerals to 14
members of the yearling court squad
and they are as follows; Bob Bart-
low, Cattaraugus, N. Y., Leo Doyle,
Pequaming; Lawrence Fadler, Pitts-
burgh, Kansas; Sam Gorsline, Battle
Creek; Bill Houle, Bellvue, Ohio;
Richard Lazar, River Rouge; Wal-
lace Keating, Detroit; Robert Krejsa,
Shaker Heights, Ohio; James Mand-
ler, Chicago, Ill.; John Mikulich,
Traunik; Edwin O'Donnell, Norwalk,
Ohio; Nowell Pridgeon, St. Clair;
Fred Stein, Ann Arbor; and Richard
Wakefield, Chicago, Ill.
The ten varsity letter winners will
meet this afternoon to select a cap-,
tain for the 1940-41 season to suc-
ceed Jim Rae, the present Wolverin
leader.
CAGE LETTER WINNERS
All basketball varsity "M" win-
ners will meet at 12 noon at
Renschler's studio today to have
their picture taken. At the same
time a new captain and next
year's manager will be elected.
Coach Oosterbaan

Purdue's Boilermakers, the Big Ten champions, along with Illinois, Indiana, Wisconsin and Northwest-
ern, placed one man on the All-Conference mythical basketball squad announced yesterday by the Associated
Press. Fred'Beretta of Purdue and Illinois' great senior forward and Conference high scorer, Bill Hapac, each
received all the ten possible votes of the coaches who participated. Jim Rae and Charley Pink of Michigan
were placed on the second team.
* * * *) * * *

CHICAGO, March 5. -(- The
honor of scoring a "double"-making
the mythical team two years in a row
-fell this season to Bill Hapac, the
high scoring Illinois basketball star
who was a unanimous choice for a
place on the Big Ten all-star team
selected by Western Conference
coaches for the Associated Press.
Hapac, named as a forward in 1939,
again was placed at that position this
year by all 10 mentors, who also gave
unanimous recognition to Fred Ber-
etta, guard on the Purdue Big Ten
championship squad.
Among stars who were selected for

the team two or more years in recent
seasons were Ernie Andres, 1938 and
1939; Jewell Young, Purdue, 1937 and
1938; John Townsend of Michigan,
1937. 1938 and 1939; Martin Rolek

of Minnesota, 1937
Tippy Dye of Ohio
1937.
The selections:
Player Pos.
Bill Hapac .:.. F
Paul Armstrong F

and 1938, and
State, 1936 and

School.
Illinois
Indiana

Year
Senior
Junior

Gene Englund C Wisconsin Junior
Fred Beretta .. G Purdue Senior
Dick Klein ... G No'western Soph.
Second Team: Don Blanken, Pur-

IN THIS

CORNER

F,-

By MEL FINEBERG

i

Scarty Cats...
Just as we thought. They're1
scared. Yes, scared. It's a nastyI
thing to say but we're forced to say
it. They're scared, scared, scared.
Who's scared? Why the coaching
staff at the University of Michigan.
It's abominable but alas, apparently
true.
Every year since time immemorial
(starting last year) the coaching
staff has played the football team
a hockey game. This year, hoping'
that a football player is as dumb
as tradition would have him, they've
(ungrammatical with staff as an
antecodent) hoped that the gridders
would forget all about the annual
affair. They've made no mention of
it, even among themselves, without
first carefully glancing over their,
collective 'shoulder to determine that
no spy is lurking to overhear. But
thank heaven for the alertness of
the press. We're here to insist that
the game be played.
We remember last year's game.
Oh how well we remember it. Why
we recall that, that . . . Yes, it was
certainly a great game.
Ah, here's that clipping. Yes, how
well we remember it. We quote from
The Daily of March 15, 1939:
"Slightly handicapped by an
extremely slippery surface and
the fact that some rules called
for shoes with runners, Michi-
gan's football players and the
varsity coaches refought the
Battle of Bull Run last night at
the Coliseum with the mentors
out-roughing the undergrads,
2-1.
"The game' was catch-as-
catch-can which the coaches
claimed gave the students the
advantage since Evashevski was
the catcher on th'e baseball team.
The gridders retorted that Ray
Fisher, the coaches' goalie, could
do the pitching so the battle
started.
"Thirteen spills later the
coaches scored the first goal.
Fritz Crisler, who felt he could
protect himself from the ruf-
TYPEWRITERSI
OF ALL MAKES
Office aad Portable Models

fians by playing on their more
chivalrous side, by wearing a
pair of lady's yellow pajana
pants, took a flat pass from
hockey coach Eddie Lowrey,
went through the defensive left
half and scored standing up.
"But the football players were
not done. Wally Hook, varsity
fullback, abandoned the punt
and pass but retained the prayer
when he dropkicked the puck
past netminder Fisher. The
game was halted as Hook main-
tained that he should get three
points for his heroic effort but
he was finally placated.
"With the score tied at one all,
the gridders threw eaution to the
winds and sent ten forwards
down the ice, Ray Fisher
promptly retaliated by turning
the nets around baekwards.
"But the hordes of football
players continued to descend
and only the sterling work on
the part of referee Mill Marsh,

who sat on a folding chair, saved
the coaches.
"Shortly afterward Lowrey
scored. Somehow Major Bowes
got in and rang a gong. The
coaches, leading 2-1, seized on
this flimsy excuse and said the
game was over.
"The game was marred iy 327
spills (actual count) and a cut
head for Ed Czak."
This then was the story of a land-
mark in Michigan athletics. Shall
it be allowed to die? Shall it fade
away as though it never had existed,
as though it had never seen the
dawn? No, we say, no, no, no!
So, on behalf of the football play-
ers who as yet know nothing about
all this, we challenge the coaching
staff to a hockey game, the public
to be invited free of charge.
Coaching staff: name the date and
the time. Our second stringers await
you.
Aside to the football players: they
can't hurt us.

_-- --- ._.. r

a..r arrrko ;

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