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January 29, 1939 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1939-01-29

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Two

THE MICHIGAN flAIV

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FINAL EXAMINATION SCHEDULE
First Semester, 1938-39
COLLEGE OF LITERATURE, SCIENCE, AND THE ARTS
REGULAR EXAMINATIONS
Time of Exercise Time of Examination j

70 American Schools Now Offer

I

Refugee Students Scholarships

Mon.
Mon.i
Mon.
Mon.a
Mon.
Mon.:
Mon.f
Tues.
Tues.
Tues.I
Tues.
Tues.
Tues.

at
at
at
at
at
at
at
at
at
at
at
at
at

8
9
10
11
1
2
3
8
9
10
11
1
2

Mon., Feb. 6 .:....... .
Fri., Feb. 3 ............
Wed., Feb. 1 ..........
Mon., Jan. 30 .........
Tues., Feb. 7 ..........
Mon., Jan. 30 ......... .
Tues., Feb. 7 ..........
Mon., Feb. 6 . ..........
Tues., Jan. 31 ........ .
Wed., Feb. 1 .........
Tues., Jan. 31.... . .
Wed., Feb. 8 ..........
Fri., Feb. 3 ............

9-12
9-12
9-12
9-12
2- 5
2- 5
9-12
2- 5
2- 5
2- 5
9-12
9-12
2- 5
9-12

Tues. at 3'
SPECIAL EXAMIN
Special Period '
No. Time of Examination
1 Sat., Feb. 4 ........ 9-12

Thurs., Feb. 2
JATIONS

. . . . . . . . .

By ROY BUEHLERr
Aid to student refugees from coun-
tries in which college educations are
no longer available on the basis ofa
ability is now being offered in the
form of scholarships by 70 American
colleges. Under the sponsorship of
the Intercollegiate Committee to Aid
Student Refugees, college organiza-
tions are also raising money to help
young men and women of othercoun-
tries to acquire a higher education, a
recent publication of the committee'
reveals.
The hope of the Intercollegiatej
Committee is that "when the histori-
ans of the future come to write of a'
generation of Central European stu-
dents and professors driven from,
their colleges and universities, they
will also record that the American
students reached out to help their
European friends."
The work in student refugee aid
was started at Harvard by a group
that first secured twenty scholar-
ships from the college. Working from
this base, the Committee set up a
similar organization in Boston; and
then, recognizing the need for inter-
collegiate cooperation, it established
a national office. This office acts in
an advisory capacity to facilitate the
organization of committees in col-
leges throughout the nation. It also
furnishes publicity matter to or-
ganizers, and acts as a clearing house

for questions concerning the move-
ment.
The technical part of the student
refugee problem, that of selecting the
best qualified students, is handled
entirely by the International Student
Service. The ISS has had long ex-
perience in bringing over students
on transfer arrangements, in find-
ing scholarships for foreign students
ind in making all the other neces-
sary arrangements.
The commonly expressed fear that
these students are being brought to
the United States to compete with
Americans in an already over-crowd-
ed labor field, the Intercollegiate
Committee states, is disproved by
statistics compiled in England which
show that no native group has been
affected by these students.
President Roosevelt has indorsed
the movement and has expressed the
hope that assistance will be given it
"by other institutions throughout
the country."
Student Runs For Office
Alex Jaffe, Grad.. of Ann Arbor,
has filed his petition for the Republi-
can nomination for alderman in t' 1e
sixth ward here. He is chairman of
the sixth ward Young Republican
Club and a director of the Ann Arbor
Young Republican Club.

II Sat., Feb. 4 ........ 2- 5
I Sat., Jan. 28... ......2- 5

Courses
German 1, 2, 31, 32.
Spanish 1, 2, 31, 32.
Music 31.
Zoology 1. Botany 1.
Psychology 31. Music 1
French 1, 2, 11, 31, 32,
41, 71, 111, 112, 153.
Speech 31, 32.

IV Thurs., Feb. 2 .......2- 5 Pol. Science 1, 2, 51, 52, 107.
iRREGULAR EXAMINATIONS
English 1 shall be examined on Tuesday, Jan. 31, 2-5.
English 30 shall be examined on Friday, Feb. 3, 9-12.
Economics 51, 52, 53, and 101 shall be examined on Thursday, Feb. 2, 9-12.
It shall be understood that classes entitled to the regular examination
periods shall have the right-of-way over the above-mentioned irregular
examinations and that special examinations Will be provided for students
affected by such conflicts by the courses utilizing the irregular examina-
tion periods.
Any deviation from the above schedule may be made only by mutual
agreement between students and instructor and with the approval of the
Examination Schedule Committee.
.. c ' ticC 110 "abc'tl

lb!

CONTINUOUS 1-3-5-7-9

P.M.

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V,W!iyr Ve~yr . ,,R- ?).-.--nter- . dorne. and 1that, he (Thor~n) had, nor,

It's a Must See Picture!

NEW Y I. , Jun- ltZL * a, J 1..-, U11Ca....U GMj iA C l l 1V111s 11a
nal reorganization of the U.S. De- intention of trying to direct po
partment of Commerce to bring the Thorp outlined a possible reorga
Government into closer touch with tion scheme in sonme detail.
industrial problems was' disclosed to- It could be roughly patterne
day to be under consideration as said, after the county farm
part of Secretary of Commerce Harry system which has proven so succ
L. Hopkins' drive to make peace be-. in agriculture.
tween business and the New Deal. Under this system, a college g
Dr. Willard L. Thorp, Hopkins' ate trained in scientific farmb
newly-appointed personal economic sent out by the Government t
advisor, and former member of the and work among the farmers
economics faculty, advocated such a
course in an interview following his county.
initial conferences with his new boss. Thorp could see no reason wh,
After emphasizing that Hopkins same thing should not apply to
alone would decide what was to be ness.

Lau tiv f

licies,
aniza-
d, he
agent
essful
radu-
ing is
o live
of a
by the
busi-

classified Directory

II

FOR RENT
FOR RENT-Modern 7-room fur-
nished house, fireplace, garage,
southeast section. Rent $70.00.
Box 8.
FOR RENT - Large double front
room $3 per man. Only four stu-
dents kept in house. 1114 Judson
Court, off Church, near Roose-
velt. Phone 8673, 357
FOR RENT-Double suite for Uni-
versity women, opposite the cam-
pus, 703 Haven Ave. Phone 7225.
359
FOR RENT-Rooms for Jewish girls
-doubles and singles, reasonable
prices, 1511 Washtenaw Ave. phone
3851. 367
FOR\RENT-Separate room in apart-
ment for graduate or business girl.
603 E. Williams. Plone 2-3936 after
office hours. 368
FOR RENTI-One double room for
boys. 411 North State, warm. Phone
4742. 369
FOR RENT-Single room, warm and
clean, I.E.S. lamp, near Medical,,
Engineering and Dental Schools.
Reasonable. Call 5460. 371
FOR RENT-A good double room for
rent at 518 Monroe St., half block
west of Law Bldg. Rental price
per man $54 for the'second semes-
ter. Call in person, or phone 6437.
372
FOR RENT-Room for 2 boys with
kitchen priveleges. Reasonable.
1127 Prospect, cor. of Church. Call
at Room 2204 E. Engineering
Building. Kintz. 358
ROOMS FOR MEN-Doubles, splen-
did location, inner-spring mat-
tresses, 3 showers, recreation room
and living room. 807 South State
St. Tel. 4844. 373
FOR RENT-Room 'for men. One
single, one double. Clean, excellent
beds. 1020 Forest. Phone 2-1080. 378

FOR RENT-Two large front double
rooms, stoker heat, Simmons coil
spring beds. Clean, comfortable. 500
Packard. 375
FOR BOYS-French family has at-
tractive clean single room with
shower. Reasonable rent. Call 7796.
376
FOR RENT-Large room for two. No
other roomers. Continuous hot
water. Phone 7089. 1030 East Hur-
on. 377
FOR RENT-Single room for man;
clean, well-heated, and pleasant.
730 S. Division. Phone 2-3387. 379
FOR RENT-407 East Kingsley,
close to campgs and downtown, in
exclusive home, double and single
room for graduate or business girls.
Double room has fireplace, twin
b e d s, inner-spring mattresses.
Single has maple furniture, 380
WANTED -- TYPING
TYPING-Experienced. Miss Allen,
'408 S. 5th Avenue. Phone 2-2935
or 2-1416. 79
TYPING-Reasonable rates. L. M.
Heywood, 414 Maynard St., phone
5689. 271
TYPING at reasonable rates. Mrs.
Howard, 613 Hill St., dial 5244. 176
TYPING and Stenography--experi-
enced. Fred Dickens, 625 E. Lib-
erty, Apt. 1, phone 2-1129. 370
LAUNDRIES
LAUNDRY - 2-1044. Sox darned.
Careful work at low prices. 9
MISCELLANEOUS
WASHED SAND and Gravel, Drive-
way gravel, washed pebbles. Killins
Gravel Company, Phone 7112. 17
PAPERHANGER-Craftsman, cap-
able fine paper work. Dial 7209. 181

'ppyLiflE GODDARD ,. ..Ci'artUR
daa91IflS fItd .iri her ilstalk
j g role!.

CASH PAID for your discarded
clothing. Claude Brown, 512 S.
Main. 311

FOR RENT--Large front doub
suite. Well furnished. Oil heat. R
duced price. 715 E. Huron. Phon
8528. 37

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NEW TERM

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