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December 11, 1938 - Image 9

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1938-12-11

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

DEC. 11, 193W

11MCHGA DIT

ammw n-a r... a -.- .. . -....

PRES
PASSES
-By BUD BENJAMIN -
Pro Football.. ..
HANKS to the 13th amendment
and a fine spirit of democracy,
the cream of the 1938 football talent
wil not be herded into the profes-
sional gridiron ranks despite the re-
cent draft.
For a number of reasons, most of
them long run. the collegiate stars
are unimpressed by the honor of be-
ing drafted into service. Polls of the
leading lights of the year show a defi-
nite trend away from the profession-
al game, and the money boys must
dig a bit deeper into their stock of
Uncle Sam's product to influence the
lads.
The reasons are varied. There
is a general unanimity of opin-
ion among the drafted men that
pro football, admittedly a high-
ly lucrative occupation for a col-
lege graduate, lacks the stability
or future of business or profes-
sion. They cringe at the thought
of getting mauled for five years
or so, and then being released in-
to a world which rapidly forgets
its heroes and appreciates a more
profound ° apprenticeship than
football. They listen with some
qualms at tales of the slap-hap-
py pro whose mental stability has
been undermined by constant
poundings in the toughest racket
of them all. Some of them ques-
tion their worth in a game soj
studded with stars. All of themI
are deeply concerned with their
own future in this highly pre-
carious existence of ours and
naturally weigh the merits of
profesionalizing their talents
with considerable care.
That the all-Americans of 1938'
are, at present, showing only a pass-d
ing interest in pro football is ex-
emplified by Grantland Rice's team
of stars. Rice asked each of theE
first eleven whther or not he would
turn pro. The results are over-
whelmingly against post-graduatei
gridiron employment.t
On Rice's team only Ki Aldriche
of T.C.U. answered definitely in
the affrimative to the question:E
"Will you turn pro?" Waddy t
Young of Oklahoma said "ma
be," and Marshall Goldberg an-
swered "no unless there is as
sizeable salary attached." Ralph
Heikkinen, Sid Roth, Joe Beinor,
Bill McKever, Bowdn Wyatt,
Davey O'Brien, Vie Bottari, and
Bob McLeod replied in the nega-
tive.
The trend is indicative in that it
holds true throughout the ranks. It
is not unusual, however, and the
players undoubtedly will waver when
the professional moguls take theE
rubber bands off their bank rolls. The
pro gridder earns anywhere from1
$1,500 to $15,000 for four monthst
work, Backs are more highly paid<
than linemen with such stars as
Whizze White dragginghdown ter-
rific salaries for college graduates- I
or forianyone else. The average is
approximately $3,500 in the big<
leagues. And that kind of compen-
sation can easily change the mind ofI
any young job-aspirant.
I called Ralph Heikkinen yester-
day and askd him what he had de-
cided to do. His answer seems to I
typify the viewpoint of his fellow
all-Americans. Rplied Heik:

"I would have preferred to play
with a team in this sector of the
country (Brooklyn got him in the
draft), but that doesn't make a
lot of difference in professional
ball. They have contacted me,
and I told them I was open to
suggestion. It depends on the sal-
ary that they offer whether or
not I turn pro."
"If you do, I suppose that will mean

Michigan Five

Takes Opener From State, 41 To 34

Leads Local Lads

Jim Rae, lanky junior center,
led the Wolverine attack against
the Spartans last night, netting 12
points. His exhibition of ball hand-
ling and passing brought reminis-
cences of last year and Jake Town-
send.
Frosh Display
SprintPower
Future Varsity Trackmen
Strong In All Events
With two months of fall practice
drawing to a close, the freshman track
squad boasting of strength in nearly
every event gives promise of contin-
uing Michigan supremacy.-
It is in the sprints the weakest de-
partment of the varsity team that
the freshmen display the most power.
The outstanding tryouts for this
event are Bud Piel of Indianapolis,
Al Thomas of Detroit, James Magee
'of Pontiac, Don Jones of Flint and
Gail Cheney of Charlotte, Mich.
Everyone of these men have already
paced off the hundred in ten flat and
show promise of lowering their marks
more yet.
Bill Coffman, of Lakewood, Ohio,
Ohio State champion quarter miler
who cinched his title in the time of
49 flat, and Charles Schmelin of
Saginaw stand out in the 440-yard
run..
In- the half mile Art Farr another
in the line of Lakewood runners and
John Kantz of Chicago are the out-
standing prospects.
Bll Ackerman of Bryan, Ohio, thus
far leads the pack in the mile dis-
tance followed closely by a number
of other promising men
Ray Gouthier of Cleveland and
Laurence Gluck of Muskegon fill the
hurdling spots while Jack McMaster
of Philadelphia and Wayne Robbins
of Cleveland hurdle for the yearling
squad. The high jump position is
well covered by Bill Hess, another
Lakewood representative.
The weight tossing division finds
George Ostroot of Viborg and Jack
Richardson of Detroit coming to the
front.
the end of a law school career," I
replied.
"It absolutely will not," he re-
turned vehemently. "I will never
giv up the study of law. If I turn
professional I will study during
the off-season and conclude my
work when I finish with the
game. I'm sitting tight, but you
can quote me as saying I still
think I'll go to law school instead
of turning professional."

Jim Rae Nets .
Twelve Points
To Lead Team
Oosterbaan Men Use Fast
Break To Beat Spartans;
Mutt Paces Invaders
(Continued from Page 1)
specialty shot and it was 14 all. Rae
made two fouls, Chester Albuchson
popped in a long, Rae fed to Beebe for
a set-up, and Callahan hit from be-
hind the foul circle to make it 18
points apiece at the half.
In the second half it went to 20-'
all, to 22-all, to 24-all, and finally to
26-25 in State's favor, their first
lead since Shidler's foul for the open-
ing point. It was the last time the
Spartans were in the ball game.
Rae's one hand flip from the foul:
line gave Michigan the lead they
never reliquished. Pink hit from the
corner, and added a foul when he was
smashed against the boards on an
attempted dog shot.
Shidler interrupted with a corner
toss, but Michigan's three quick bas-
kets put the game on ice. Smick took
a pass from Rae and angled one over
his head, Beebe leaped in the air
and shot a beautiful pass to Thomas
under the basket, and Ed canned the
shot for another. Then came the]
game's highlight.1
Pink had the ball at the far end
of the court. He spotted Smick in
the open under the Michigan basket
and tossed a one handed pass the!
length of the floor. Charley's left arm
is a lot stronger than he realizes, the
ball sailed against the Michigan
backboard, almost dropped in the
basket for what would have been a
sensational shot, and Smick picked it
off to drop the shot. That made it :i6
to 28, the biggest Michigan lead of
the game.
State added two fouls and two bas-[
kets and Michigan a foul and twoj
baskets in the closing minutes, most
of which found the Wolverines stall-
ing in the backcourt with State vainly
trying to get possession.
BOX SCORE
Michigan State 34) F G FT TP
Shidler, f...............2 1 5
Dargush, f. ...........1 0 2
Falkowski, f............3 0 6,
Phillips, f........... .0o 0 0
Hutt,c................4 0 8I
Hindman, c.............1 0 21
Callahan. gg.............3 1 71
Henry, g ................ 0 2 21
Abuchon ................1 0 21
Totals.............15 4 34

Player Shot M
Shidler, foul (Smick) ...0
Hutt, flip...............0
Smick, flip ........ ......2
Rae, long...............4
Rae, foul (Falkowski)......5
Callahan., long.... .......5
Thomas, 'long............
Thomas, long .............9
Falkowski, hook-side .......9
Shidler, long ..............9
Rae, foul (Shidler) ........10
Beebe, long.............12
Falkowski flip-under......12
Callahan, foul (Smick) .. . .12
Smick, overhand flip .....14
Hutt, whirl-flip ...........14
Rae, 2 foul (Dargush) .. . .16
Abuchon, long ............16
Beebe, set-up ............18
Callahan, long..........18
SECOND HALF
Rae, hook .... .... .20
Hutt, overhead flip .......20
Falkowski, backward flip ..20
Smick, tip-in ............22
Dargush, flip...........22
Rae, hook .. . . . . . . . . . . 24
Smick, foul (Hutt) .......25
Callahan, long ........... 25
Rae, push-shot ............27
Pink, long ...............29
Pink, foul (Callahan ......30
Shidler, long .............30
Smick, set-up overhead ...32
Thomas, set-up..........34
Smick, set-up ............36
Henry, 2 fouls (Pink) ....36
Hlindman, hook.........36
Pink, push-shot ..........38
Hutt, set-up.. ....... .3
Thomas, set-up . . . . . . . . .40
Pink, foul (Aubuchon) ....41

MSC
1
3
3
5
5
5
7
9
9
9
11
12
12
14
14
16
16
18

18
20
22
22
24
24
24
26
26
26
26
28
28
28
28
30
32
32
34
34
34

Shot By Shot

Balanced Team-
Seen ByHoyt
Sprinters Show Promise;
SophomoresImprove
"Yes, sir, we're going to have a
balanced team this year,' said Charlie
Hoyt as he abandoned his usual pes-
simistic pre-Christmas outlook on the
track situation yesterday. The occas-
ion of Charlie's departure from cus-
tom was the conclusion of the final
time trial before Christmas.
The team as a whole was most
impressive yesterday as the track
events produced excellent times. The
field events were run off Friday and
also showed a great deal of improve-
ment.
The progress made by the sprinters
as evidenced in their performance
yesterday was especially pleasing to
the Wolverine mentor. Al Smith,
Carl Culver, and sophomore Jimmy
Monahan all showed more stuff than
the Field House has seen from a
Michigan sprinter since Sam Stoller
made his exodus from the ranks.
Sophomores are also the reason
for much of the Hoyt enthusiasm in
the other track events. Warren Breid-
enbach and Phil Balyeat in the
quarter, Jack Leutritz and Howie
Egert in the half-mile and Karl
Wisner and Ed Barrett in the mile,
along with Jeff Hall in the hurdles
have come along to augment the
strong veteran lineup in these events.
Goodfeliows-Monday-
U.C.L.A., Oregon State
Tie 6-6 In Grid Final
LOS ANGELES, Dec. 10. -(P)-
The Pacifia Coast Conference grid
wars came to an end here today as
the Bruins of the University of Cali-I
fornia at Los Angeles and Oregon
State's Beavers struggled to a 6 to 6
tie before 'a disappointing crowd ,of
less than 10,000.
The Uclans rolled up 23 first downs
to 3, and gained 388 yards to 114
h

BEFORE YOU CLASSIFY CONSIDER
SECRETARIAL and
BUSINESS TRAINING
Courses which combine the practical with the theoretical, capitalize
on your college education and make your services in demand.
HAMILTON BUSINESS COLLEGE
24th year William at State Phone 7831

Be a Goodfellow -
Larson Named New Grid
Coach At Naval Academy
ANNAPOLIS, Md., Dec. 10.--(P)-
Navy placed its 1939 football hopes
today in the knowing hands of Capt.
Emery E. (Swede) Larson, a marine
renowned throughout the service for
'the good fortune that always has fol-
lowed his coaching efforts.
Captain Larson's appointment as
head coach to succeed Lieut. H. J.
(Hank) Hardwick was announced by
Capt. E. W. Mcke, director of ath-
letics at the Naval Academy. He
becomes the first Marine officer to
coach a Navy football team.
In appointing Larson, present com-
mander ofthe marine detachment
at the Naval Academy, the Navy
stuck to its graduate coach policy.
Hardwick will return to sea duty at
his own request. No other changes in
the coaching staff were made.
Do Your
Christmas
Shopping Early
at4
Burr Patterson
Auld Co.
RUTH ANN OAKES, Mgr.
603 Church
Phone 8887

--send
friends
greetin
lection
charm
ings.
Francisco

723 North University

"I got a leg from some old table
f got an arm from some old chair,

I

got a neck from some old bottle,

Michigan (4)
Smickf...
Dobson, f ....
Pink, f .......
Brogan, f ....
Rae, c .......
Beebe, g
Thomas, g ...

l

FG FTTP
.5 1 11
.0 0 0
.2 2 6
.0 0 0
.4 4 12
.2 0 4
.4 9 8
17 7 41

And f rom a horse 1 go dsome hair.

NowI put them all together,

Totals ...............

With some paste and some old glue,

Half time score: Michigan State
18; Michigan 18.'
Personal fouls:, Shidler 3, Hutt,
Aubuchon 2, Smick 3, Pink 3, Beebe.
Free throw missed: Shidler, Dar-
gush, Falkowski, Smick, Pink, Rae.
Referee: Eddie Powers (Detroit);
Umpire: Fred Spurgeon (Kalama-
zoo).,

And I get more lovin

Meet Me at the PARROT

From the darn old dummy
Than I ever got from you.
DOWN WITH COEDS!

w

The Parrot feeds you right!
Won't you drop in for a bite?

ES

Fruit Cocktail

m~u1X

.

Roast Turkey
Roast Chicken
Large Beef Tenderloin
Top Sirloin Steak

.. .
_ .

T-Bone Steaks
Tenderloin Steaks
Chops - Lamb, Veal, Pork
Roast Prime Ribs of Beef
Breaded Veal Cutlets
Hampton Scallops
Swiss Steak

See the

Potatoes
Vegetable
Salad
Celery and Olives

TRAIN FOR THE JOB
Shorthand - Typing - Business English
Special class beginning now in
MEDICAL SHORTHAND
Ann Arbor Secretarial School
Nickels Arcade Phone 3330

DECEMBER GARGOYLE

I

60c - 55c - 50c - 45c

Hot Rolls
Beverage
Dessert

on Tuesday, Dec, 13th'

11.

The PARROT
Where a man's steak is served

Sunday 70c Special

i
lYtgli ®

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a 9.

QNEW
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RESOLVED:
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