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December 08, 1938 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1938-12-08

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE M I C I G AN -D A I LY ""UR"A, " EC.

193

OSU To Meet
Today To Plan
For Convention
,ocal Chapter In Drive
To Obtain 150 Members
Before Christmas Recess
As part of its drive to enroll 150
eibers before the national conven-
n to be held Christmas vacation
New York City, the American Stu-
nt Union is holding a meeting at;
p.m. today in room 323 of the Union
discuss the convention and elect
legates to it.'
"Keep Democracy Working by
eeping It Moving" will be the cen-
al theme of the fourth annual con-
ntion which will be attended by
presentatives from ASU chapters
roughout the country. Hugo Reich-
t, '39, will discuss this topic tonight
d a discussion on the issues to be
esented will follow. These include
[he University We Want To Study
," "The America We Want To Live
" and "The World That Will Give
s Peace."
Molly Yard, a member of the ASU
tional executive board who has been
China working on aid to students
.ere, will speak at 3 p.m. tomorrow
the Michigan League. She will meet
cal faculty members, townspeople
ad students at this tizhe to coordin-
e work being done here to aid China
ad boycott Japan.
---Be a Goodfellow
lorticulturalists Excited
By Apple Juice Future
GRAND RAPIDS, Dec. 7.-(AP)-
he possibility of building a new $1,-
)0,000-a-year industry from the sale
FMichigan apple juice excited the
iterest tonight of members of the
tate Horticultural Society and al-
ed groups meeting here,
2:00 - 4:00 - 7:00 - 9:00 P.M.
NOW PLAYING !
M-G-M's ROMANCE -
ON WINGS OF SONG!
The great music... the great.
Strauss II, World 's Walz
King, in a production that
sets a new standard for
beauty an 1-thrill!

Japan Claims Former Treaties
Are Obsolete In Modern Crises

Il Duce, 14 Seems, Can Do No Wrong

(Continued from Page 1)
both the incidents leading to its adop-
tion and its main provisions.
The solid basis for Japanese control,
on the Chinese mainland was laid
back in 1904, when at the conclusion
of the surprising Russo-Japanese
War, Japan became established in
South Manchuria, gained complete
Control over Korea and stepped'boild-
ly forth as a world power--a formid-
tble force to be reckoned with froni
hat Ltime on by all nations interested
in territory or trade in the Far East.
Get German Colonies
In the ten-year interim between
the end of the Russo-Japanese War
f md the World War, events in the
Far East remained practic'ally un-
changed. With the coming of the
World War, however, Japan lanuched
on a more determined program of
expansion. Entering the War on the
side of the Allies, Japan quickly cap-
tured the German leasehold of Tsing-
tao, and took possession of the Ger-
man rights in Shahtung Province.
While the European nations were
busy fighting on the Eastern Front,
Japan considered the tiie opportune
to press bold claims in China, and, in
1915 she presented to that nation her
famous Twenty-one demands, which
together with some others calling for
Japanese advisors to the Chinese gov-
ernment, would have converted China
into a Ja~panese protectorate.
In accordance with its previously-
announced policy of keeping an Oren
Door in China for the trade of, all
natioh1s,,the United States protested
vigorously to the Japanese demands
upon China, declaring that it would
not recognize treaties conclucded on,
the bas;is of those demands.
Nothing definite concern':igs. the
issues created by Japan's World War
policy was reached until the Wash-
ington Conference in 1921. Accord-
ing to Lerepoip of that conference
writterInrbyT. 'A. Bissolnifor the
Foreign Policy Association, a series
of compromises were worked out.
Japan obtained two important con-
cessions. First, the United States gave
Committee To Aid China
Will Be Organized Here
A. United Committee to Aid China
will be formed at a meeting to be held
at 3 p.m. tomorrow in the League,
for the purpose of integrating all
activity being carried on locally on
behalf of China.
The meeting will be addressed by
Molly Yard, national chairman of the
Far Eastern Student Service Fund.
. - .

up naval supremacy by agreeing to a
ratio in capital ships of five for itself
and Great Britain and three foi
Japan. Second, further fortifications
of the island possessions of the Paci-
fic powers was prohibited. Under these
conditions neither the United States
nor Great Britain could attack Japan I
with any prospect of successq
In retu:i for this assurance of
security Japan agreti to restore to
China the rights it had acquired in
Shantng Province, although it re-
tahied its extended rights in Man-
churia. Japan also promised to with-
draw its troops from Siberia, a
pledge which it fulfilled in 1922.
Japan Signs Pact
Finally, Japan signed the Nine-
Power Treaty. In this pact Japan
pledged itself, along with the other
powers, to respect China's sovereign-
ty, independence, and territorial and
administrative integrity, to provide
China the fullest and most unembar-
rassed opportunity to develop and
maintain an effective and stable Aov-
erinment, and to use its influence to
maintain the principle of the "open
door," giving all nations equal trade
opportunities throughout Chinese ter-
ritory.
In less than ten years after the
signing of the pact Japan embarked
on a new program of expansion in
China that has not stopped yet.
Goaded by inexorable economic and
political conditions, she marched into
Manchuria in 1931, set up the new
state of Manchukuo in 1932, and is
today still persisting in her intention
of establishing virtual or actual con-
trol over the resources, the trade and
the territory of China.
Japan's drive against China has
of course, precipitated conflict with
the interests and policies of three
powers-the United States, England
and Russia. In contrast with the tra-
ditional policy of aloofness from the
affairs of the European countries,
American policy has always been one
of active interest and participation
in the affairs of the Far East.
When Japan advanced into Man-
churia, the United States not only
cooperated with action taken by the
League of Nations but also made
direct protests to Tokyo. On Jan. 7,
1932, Secretary of State Stimson
issued the famous "non-recognition"
statement saying that we would not
recognize any "situation, treaty or
agreement" reached between China
and Japan that violated the provi-
sions of the Nine-Power Treaty or the
Kellogg Pact outlawing war. In 1934
when Japan announced her inten-
tion of eliminating the influence of
Western powers from the Far East
Secretary Hull at once took issue with
this position, declaring that the
United States intended to maintain
all its treaty rights in the Far East.
The recent note sent to the Japanese
government by the State Department
was a continuation of the policy of
protesting violations on the part of
treaty-signers.
Opinion Undetermined
But the inescapable fact is that
American protests and statements of
policy .have not caused Japan to
swerve from her expansionist course
for one moment. As a result the atti-
tude of the public toward American
participation in Far Eastern affairs
is vague and indeterminate, but there
are certain trends that can be ascer-
tainied.
Many Americans believe that the
United States should withdraw from
the Orient and let Japan go ahead.
They say that Japanese aggression is
not important enough to the majority
of the American people to justify
going to war. They do not favor fight-
ing to defend the Open Door policy,
to protect American trade and in-
vestments in the Far East.
Other Americans insist that a policy
of withdrawal will not prevent the
outbreak of a war in which we are
liable to become involved. They feel
3 that Japan's advance toward complete
domination of the Far East has struck
a fatal blow at the treaty structure

in the Pacific, and will eventually
endanger the security of the United
States. Therefore they favor some
form of concerted action which, they
hope, will check Japan before war
results.
H. W. CLARK
English Boot and Shoe Maker
Our new repair department, the
best in the city. Prices are right.
438 South State and Factory on
South Forest Avenue.

Moral And Technical Changes
Reflected In 15th Cenury Art
(Editor's Note: This is a continuation ish not only in size but in clarity.
of the article by Miss Moore which
appeared in ycsterdays .Daily,) This man, Masaccio, has been called
By SYLVIA MOORE the real father of- iiodern painting.
Dissipation and license brake looseThis fixed the ideals of naturalistic
DiFonaali bre loepainting, which were to remain until
in Florence after a terrible catastro- the time of the Impressionists,
ohe which cut Florentine :istory in His successors were divided into
two-the Great Plague of 1348. the moderate progressives and the ex-
People broke away from the old ideas perimentalists. or realists. The ideals
of morality and religion. Naturally of the latter group have been more
this was reflected in are. lasting in value.
The course of art in the fifteenth They appear first in the middle of
century was a constant rivalry be- the fifteenth century to work on light
tween the Florence of the racetrack and shade, anatomy, and perspective.
and tavern and the Florence of the One of the first generation artists
Studio. The Studio was a small group squares the forms, anticipating mod-
of hardworking scholars and artists ern Cubism, in order to simplify the
who clung to ideals of toil and disci- problem of placing and fore-shorten-
pline in an age of frivolity Eventually ing. The second generation worked at
their standards prevailed; discipline, the new technique of oil painting,
which made the great art of the landscape, and the figure in action.
period, conquered. Both groups relatively neglected
Though the progressive artists tried i the important matter of composition.
to break away from tradition, each ' Most of them sacrificed pictorial
developed a phase of art which Giotto effects to' ma' er detail, but they ac-
had rediscovered. cumulated the L'owledge on which
Many artists also discovered new is based the glory c the High 'enais-
things for themselves. One man made sance.
the radical innovation that the brush This period was, roug. , the Flor-
should distribute color and light and ence of Cosimo de Medic. Tlorence,
dark so as to give the truest repre- inder his reign, developed in wvorld-
sentation of mass and distance. He liness; Greek studies paved the way
also brought in aerial perspective, for an enlightened humanism, and a
noticing that distant objects dimin- revival of the pagan sense of beauty.

"To err is human" is an outmoded phrase in Rome. A
hall bore this sign: "Mussolini is always right."

minerals exhibit

Japanese efeat Is Foreseen
By Former Chinese Officer

(Continued fr;m Page 1) tanks useless, and the close quarters
---- ---of the narrow streets kept artillery
ers, and held by the invaders, he from being used, Mr. Ling pointed
began, was the center of a long battle- t out. This, he said, enabled the Chi-
line, vese forces to engage the Japanese
The Chinese troops moved toward in physical combat. He said that the
the center of the line from either end, Chinese found their two-handed
Ling said, cutting off the Japanese 1 -ords, with blades more than three
forces in Taiertchuan. The sandy feet long, the most effective weapons.
ground of the river banks made their l The complete rot of the Japanese
which followed this encounter in the
Avuka.h To Discuss crowded streets of Taiertchuan.IMr.
Ling emphasized, was bad for their
Refuteee Situation morale, and it caused them to fight
in constant fear of a personal meet-
in~g with Chinese troops. This mental
Avukah, the National Student Zion- deterioration, he concluded, is going
ist Organization, will discuss the pres- to prove a decisive factor in the final
ent Jewish refugee situation, at a outcome of the war.
meeting to be held at 7:30 p.m. to- Goodfellows-Monday
day in the Hillel Foundation. -r,

FREE ADJUSTMENT!
Winter carbureter adjustment and exhaust gas analysis without
charge. Enjoy winter driving with more miles per gallon of gasoline.
Please phone or stop by for an appointment so you won't have to
wait in line.
LARMEE
BATTERY AND ELECTRIC SERVICE

112 South Ashley Street

Phone 8908

Shopay
FOLLETTS 4*,
--a r
1a s

Special effort will be made to tier
up the present situation to the Ugan-
da Proposal of 1903. Bernard Haber,
'40E, president of Avukah, sees many
surprising similarities between the
two crises, and he intends to bring
them up at today's meeting.
Good~ellows-Monday--
Mexican Workers Strike
At largest Slver Mimiec

FLkspectives Begins
' History Series
A history of the University written
by David Spengler, '40, with the col-
laboration of the Perspectives staff.
will be featured in the current issue
of Perspectives, which will be dis-
tributed free of charge to Daily sub-
scribers Sunday.

4
fM,

GI

lYE

EVENING RADIO

PROGRAMS

WJR

GRIEAT
WALjTZ
LUISE FERNAND
RAINER-GRAVElT
MLIZA ,
KoRJUS.
HUGH HERBERT- LIONEL ATWILL
And Cast of Thousands
Screen Play by Samuel Hoffenstein
and Walter Reisch I
Directed by Julien Duvivier g

6:00
6:30
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10:30
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12:30
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8:30
9:30
10:30
11:00
11:30
12:00
12:30
6:00
6:30
7:00
7:30
8:00
8:30
9:00
9:30
10:00
10:30
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12:00
12:30
6:0t)
6:30
7:00
7:30
8:00
9:00
10:00
tl :00
11:30
12:00
12:30
1:00

Stevenson News-
The Inside of Sports
To be announced
Joe Penner
Kate Smith Hour
Major Bowe's Amateur Hour
Number Please
American At Work
News
Cab Calloway's Orchestra
Sammy Kaye's Orchestra
Will Osborne's Orchestra
'he Day in Review
Easy Aces
The Green Hornet
To be announced
America's Town Meeting
People- I Have Known
Hawaiian Serenaders
Lou Breese Orchestra
Ramon Ramos Orchestra
Ted Weems Orchestra
CKLW
Stop and Go
Isham Jones' Orchestra
Washington News Commentator
Don't You Believe It
Montreal Orchestra
Burns Baptist Church
Veterans of Foreign Wars
We Want A Touchdown
Henry Weber's Concert Revue
Dance Orchestra
Canadian Club Reporter,
Little Jack Lttle's Orchestra
Benny Goodman's Orchestra
Jan Garber's Orchestra
WWJ
Tyson's Sports
Bradcast
Amos'n' Andy
Detroit News Radio Extra
Rudy vail'e
Good News of 1939
Kraft Music Hali
Newscast
Hotel Statier Orchestra
Webster Hall Orchestra
Dance Music
Weather; Sores

Entitled "As We Gaily March 1
MEXICO CITY, Dec.'.*- (P- Along," this essay is the first in a
Workers of the world's largest silver series discussing what the University
mine at Pachuca, Hidalgo state, went has been, what it is and what it will
on strike, paralyzing operations, to- be in the future.
day, in- a dispute with employersq over This will be the second issue of
a new labor contract. Perspectives, campus literary maga-
The mine is operated by a sub- zinc, this semester. The magazine,
sidiary of the United States Smelt- edited by F. Randall Jones, '39, con-
ing, Refining and Mining Co., with tains fiction, essays, poetry and book-
head offices in Boston, and employs leviews written by students and fac-
6,500 workers. ulty of the University.
00 YPSILANTI NORMAL CHOIR
SINGING UNACCOMPANIED 250 VOICES
FREDERICK ALEXANDER, Conductor
NaiiyCHRISTMAS MUSIC
Nativity Music from Many Lands Old Music-Young Voices
- PEASE AUDITORIUM. YPSILANTI No Reserved Seats
THURSDAY, DEC. 8, 8 P.M. SHARP ADMISSION 25c
_ -eeagasyga Lagwmgaaaggcgg~ggg

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Extra
NEWS OF
THE DAY
SATURDAY
Shining Hour"

"The

12 SHOPPING DAYS

till the price increase of the
MICHIGANENSIAN

-featuring

* PADDED COVERS,

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