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September 20, 1938 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1938-09-20

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EPT. 20, 1939 THE MICHIGAN DAILY

I

New York City
Votes Today In
Last Purge Tilt
Rep. O'Connor Opposes
New Dealer Fay Who Is
Supported By Roosevelt
The Democ'ats of a section of New
York .City will decide today (Tues-
day) the outcome of the last of Presi-
dent Roosevelt's announced efforts
to rid Congress of Democrats whom
he calls Conservatives.
They will choose between Rep.
John J. O'Connor, whom Mr. Roose-
velt has denounced as "one of the
most effective obstructionists" in the
House, and James H. Fay, New Deal-
er backed personally by the Chief
Executive.
Although the President was beaten
in similar fights recently in the Dem-
ocratic Senatorial primaries of South
Carolina, Georgia and Maryland, Mr.
Roosevejlt's aides indicated they were
hopeful of better fortune in New
York.
Because of its national aspects, the
O'Connor-Fay contest overshadowed
other primary elections today
throughout the remaindr of New
York and in three other states-New
Jersey, Wisconsin and Massachu-
setts.
In New Jersey, former Sen. W.
Warren Barbour was seeking the Re-
publican Senatorial nomination
against C. Dan Coskey and George
0. Pullen. William H. Ely was un-
opposed for the Democratic nomina-
tion.
The Massachusetts primaries pre-
sented spirited contests for the guber-
natorial nominations of both par-
ties. Gov. Charles F. Hurley, Demo-
crat, was opposed by former Gov.
James M. Curley, Francis E. Kelly
and Richard M. Russell. Leverett Sal-
tonstall, Frederick Butler, William
McMasters and Richard D. Whit-
comb contested for the Republican
nomination.
In Wisconsin, Sen. F. Ryan Duff y
was unopposed for renomination of
the Democratic ticket. Six men ran
for the Republican Senatorial nom-
ination, and two for the Progressive.
Gov. Philip F. LaFollette,seeking re-
nomination by the Progressive Party,
was opposed by Glenn Turner, a
former Socialist. Attempting to ce-
ment opposition to LaFollette, Robert
K. Henry ran for governor on both
Republican and Democratic tickets.'
His opponents were two Democrats
and three Republicans.
As chairman of the House Rules
Committee, Representative O'Connor
of New York holds a key position in
the progress of legislation. With but
few exceptions, all bills must e ap-
proved by his committee before they
can come up for discussion on the
floor of the House.
White House displeasure with O'-
Connor is said commonly to have had
its start at the time the Public Utili-
ty Holding Company Bill and its so-
called "death sentence" provisions
were before Congress. More recently,
O'Connor opposed the Government
Reorganization Bill, a measure upon
which the President has insisted.
In addition to seeking Democratic
renomination, O'Connor entered him-
self as a candidate for the Republican
nomination. In that contest, he was
opposed by Allen Dulles.
Fire Prevention Week
WASHINGTON, Sept. 19.-(IP)--
President Roosevelt has designated
the week beginning Oct. 9 as fire
Prevention week. His proclamation
emphasized the "disastrous conse-
quences of preventable fires."

Nothing Musical Under The Sun,
Stumps Versatile Prof. Muddy

Interlochen Music Camp
Founder Has Taught In'
Ann Arbor Since 1924
Composer of symphonies, master of
every band instrument, director of
three radio broadcasts and a super-
visor of two others, lecturer, director
of the National Music Camp at Inter-
lochen are only a few of the positions
held at the present time by the versa-
tile Dr. Joseph E. Maddy, professor
of music in the Institute of Fine Arts,
professor of public school music in
the School of Music and in charge of
radio music instruction.
In 1924, Professor Maddy came to,
Ann Arbor to supervise music in Ann
Arbor public schools and the public
school music department of the
University School of Music which at
that time was not affiliated with the
University. He immediately started'
a supervisors' orchestra among his
students which within a year dis-
placed the old symphony orchestra
as the University Symphony.
Professor Maddy was made a pro-
fessor of music in the newly created
Fine Arts division in 1928 with in-
structions to promote music any-
where and everywhere without re-
strictions. In addition he became a
member of the Extension Division
under which he gave lectures
throughout the state. In the same
year and two years later he or-
ganized and conducted a National
High School Orchestra in Chicago for
the Music Educators National Con-
ference.
From 1926 to 1934, Professor Maddy
acted as chairman of the National
Band and Orchestra Contests and
for the past two years as president
of the Music Educators National Con-
ference of which he is now first vice-
president.
The National Music Camp at Inter-
lochen, Mich., was inaugurated by
him in 1928. He still directs this
group which he will take to New
York City for a week in August next
year to play for the World's Fair.
Featured at Interlochen are the radio
workshop, laboratory courses in ra-

dio programs and visual aid, i.e., mo-
tion pictures and radio.
In 1931. Professor Maddy conceived
the idea of teaching music by air.
After receiving permission from Prof.
Waldo Abbot, director of the Univer-
sity Broadcasting Service, he began
teaching band instruments by means
of voluntary bands in the studio.
This was so popular that the NBC
network became interested putting
him on a national hookup from Chi-
cago for the past two seasons. This
year the program will originate from
Ann Arbor, the first time that the
network has allowed a University to
originate continual programs. That
these programs reach afar is evi-
denced by letters of commendation
received from England, Scotland,
Ireland, Egypt, Syria, South Africa
and New Zealand. In addition to
the band lessons, Professor Maddy
conducts a hymn singing class over
WJR on Sundays and an elementary
singing class on Mondays. Two oth-
er programs supervised by him are
the Music and American Youth pro-
gram over the NBC and the Ameri-
can School of the Air over the CBS.
Through the Extension Division,
Professor Maddy gives lectures
throughout the state. As a result of
these he started the first CCC band
in the United States at Camp Goge-
bic in the upper penninsula. Since
then he has been made supervisor
of music in the army in Michigan,
Illinois and Wisconsin.
Since 1928, Professor Maddy's serv-
ices have been in great demand for
the organization of all-state bands,
orchestras and choruses in many
states of the Union including In-
diana, Michigan, Illinois, Kansas,
New York, West Virginia, Tennessee,
Florida, Oklahoma, Colorado, Iowa,
Utah, Georgia, New Jersey, South
Dakota, New Mexico and Louisiana.
Last spring, Professor Maddy
scored a complete symphony in con-
junction with Allan Grant of the
NBC network. Based on Stephen
Foster's melodies, the symphony, en-
titled "Southland," was presented at
Interlochen this summer and will be
given at the New York World's Fair
next year.

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