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December 02, 1938 - Image 8

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1938-12-02

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY FRIDAY, DEC. 2, 1938

Books And Magazine Subscriptions
At Least Outlast Christmas Season

' 11

1 1.

Look Through These New
Titles For Suggestions
In Literary Presents
By JOSEPH GIES
This season's supply of Christmas
books doesn't seem to be either more
or less intriguing than those of prior
Yuletides. There are those who hold
it an error for one person to attempt
to pick out another's reading matter
for him, but times have been so bad
in recent years that most people only
give Christmas presents to their clos-
est friends, so perhaps it's safe to
hazard a choice. In general only the
newest books are given for Christ-
mas, partly no doubt so that the re-
cipient cannot have already read it,
and partly because a certain extrin-
sic value attaches to the mere new-
ness in a gift.
At any rate, here are a few sugges-
tions from among the most recent
books of general interest:
ALL THIS AND HEAVEN TOO, a
new novel by Rachel Field. it relates
the story of a French girl who is in-
volved in a scandal murder which
forces her to flee to America, (where
people are more broadminded?) She
is really innocent, of course, and in
America finds Love. It takes place
in the mid-nineteenth century. $2.50.
TO REMEMBER AT MIDNIGHT,
by Michael Foster. Another romantic
bit of nostalgic looking back by the
author of American Dream. This one
is about the theatre, with all the
familiar characters and the familiar
series of events. Rendered charming,
nonetheless, by the highly skillful
writing technique of Mr. Foster. $2.50.
WISDOM'S GATE, by Margaret
Ayer Barnes. A sequel to Pulitzer-
prize-winning "Years of Grace," it
carries on the story of Cicely into the
second generation. The scene is laid
in Chicago, which is as good a place
as any. $2.50.
MAN'S HOPE, by Andre Malraux.
The much-publicized Spanish book
by the best of the revolutionary nov-
elists. Hardly a novel, it is a gigantic
portrait of the struggle of Loyalist
Spain, ending, as its title indicates,
on a note of optimism for the future
of mankind. $2.50.
SPELLA HO, by H. E. Bates. This is
advertised as the struggle of a man
for money and power, and his obses-
sion with these and with women. The
title sounds pretty impressive. $2.50.
THE FIFTH COLUMN AND THE
FIRST FORTY-NINE STORIES, by
Ernest Hemingway. The chief interest
in this book will probably lie in the
play, which will be produced in New
York this winter. It deals with the
Spanish war, its hero being a chief
of the Republican counter-espionage
service. Some of the stories have never
before been published. $2.75.
THE KING WAS IN HIS COUNT-
ING HOUSE, by Branch Cabell. A
story of Renaissance Italy, for some-
one who likes Branch Cabell. $2.50.
0. HENRY MEMORIAL AWARD
PRIZE STORIES OF 1938, edited by
Harry Hansen. The stories aar prob-
ably of about the same quality as
those which usually grace Mr. Han-
sen's colletion. Manynew authors
are represented. $2.50.
THE GRACIE ALLEN MURDER
CASE, by S. S. Van Dine. The clever-
est recent innovation in the mystery
story business; Gracie Allen and
George Burns are characters in the
script. $2.00.
LISTEN, THE WIND, by Anne Mor-
row Lindbergh. Mrs. Lindbergh's sur-
prising ability to write is once more
displayed in the account of the flight
from Africa to Brazil in 1933. $2.50.
THE PADEREWSKI MEMOIRS, by
Ignace Jan Paderewski and Mary
Lawton. The celebrated pianist's life
from boyhood through his leadership
of the Polish national fight for lib-
erty. $3.75.

New Effects Pajamas Pr
In Suspenders To The A
Are Offered
By MORTON JAMPEL
When fall and winter roll around When the flannel nightie went out
each year, most men will preparefor of style along with long side-burns
tehyar, meslmen by chpaeii rand string bow ties, the world re-
the harsh elements by changing their ceived a new social heritage-the pa-
seasonal habits of dress in one very jama
interesting and almost universal man- Among the numerous vital prob-
ner--discard the belt and reassume lems that the pajama has successfully
the suspender harness, which during solved is the question that is espe-
past seasons have been characterized cially important at Christmas time,
by more and more features for added "What shall I give him (or her)?"
comfort. Skeptics and pessimists just [The answer is "When in doubt give
add the brace support without re- him pajamas.
moving the midriff leash and walk For years ties were the reliable gift.
around the campus in a self-content- But a united effort from the harassed
ed, confident manner. male population of the nation suc-
This year thermakers of suspenders ceeded in discouraging Christmas tie-:
have contributed markedly to this givers from pursuing their malignant
trend towards comfort and at the course. Today the pajama is the
same time have kept in tune with the gift.
new fabric developments, so that now At the present time the history of
diagonal weaves, herringbone pat- the pajama is undergoing a crisis. In
terns and tweed effects are being of- the boom days of 1929 the general
fered to match suitings. Leather and happy-go-lucky attitude of a money-
making people resulted in flamboy-
ant pajamas. Tired business men re-'
laxed in grandiose creations of ParisĀ°
silks in violets, reds, yellows and
huge polka dots. With the crash
and the depression the loud colored
pajamas, disappeared with their ka-
leidoscopic cousin the blazer jacket.
The serious attitude of the people
was immediately reflected in sober
colors. Loud hues disappeared from
everything and pajamas were not an
exception.
Accompanying the disappearance
of loud colors and such remarks as
"Those are so loud they must keep
you awake nights" were the expensive
textiles. Clever manufacturers cre-
ated smart looking prints into neat
f but sobre garments. They learned
to add dark cuffs and collars of imi-
tation silk, invented new semi-elastic,;
and automatic fitting belts. Theyl
braces tend to favor the lighter leath-
ers. The slight elasticity of braided
belts is giving them increased popu-
larity.
Garters, too, show a move towards
-reater comfort. Many of our col-
leagues from the other end of the
fabric-leather combinations will also diagonal just don't wear any (for
be worn. greater comfort) but they still are
And for comfort, the suspender en- "musts" for the well-dressed Michi-
gineers have redesigned in every gan man.
phase, and have developed free swing-

ovide A Facile Answer

built pockets and belts and flooded
the market with new designs. High-
collared Russian affairs with the
jacket buttoning down one side made
their appearance. Manufactukers
strained their ingenuity in an effort
to keep the pajama market alive, and
as a result the first sign of prosperity
has brought pajamas back full bloom.
Whether the country will return
to loud pajamas again is being de-
termined this year. Campuses, in
keeping with their general flair for
loud accessories, are going in strong-
ly for flamboyant pajamas again.
Depression-created, expensive look-
ing but cheaply priced pajamas retain
their popularity. Desigps in the great-
est demand are tailored suits of heavy,
printed cottons, that make smart
lounging outfits and comfortable
sleeping clothes.
In addition to these less expensive
pajamas the local haberdasheries are
offering the expensive French silk
garments. These must be hand-
washed, but are reported to be ex-
tremely light and comfortable for
sleeping. The imported silks are
usually solid colors, with loud hues
taboo. Blues, maroons, browns, and
tans are most popular.
Several style-setting factors have
determined these pajama vogues. Th6
invention of the pajama party is

ing straps, adjustable backs, ec
movable clasps. Metal clamps ar
fered for the man whose trousers
un- or de-buttoned. Since the fE
nine members of our happy comn
ity have not made enthusiastic
vances toward the realization
accomplishment of their just func
-sewing on suspender buttons--
last named feature should .be esp
ally welcome in these parts.
An innovation in belts and susj
ders this winter will be the usE
rawhide, although, on the whole,
Giver but no-
forgotten . .
GIFTS that every man
really wants are the kind
that are not forgotten--
Canton-Degener has gifts
that please.
ilk~

of- -a.
are
emi-
nun-
ad-AL
andMakeThs
tion
this
eci-A
A Sporting CUhristmas
teen-r
e of
the
Here are a few suggestions:
SKATES
Me's..$4.95 u
Women's $4.25 up
BADMINTON
RACKETS...
$1.95 up
SKI EQUIPMENT . ::>>:.:. SKI POLES
\ i f SKI WAXES
Large Selection *K A
to choose from. SKI HARNESS
BOXING GLOVES
$1.95 up
FOOTBALLS
95c up
Ig
71

L

"1

4

Strking
plains.

sport gloves and
Priced 1.00-1.35

2 ue~d m dt ead Lcwm,

6 f

4 y vq'
. .' s4
:. 3 '4'-
{ "..Y .
F'""' r": %t 'k}'
'!
y i
. ,.'.,
h
Mt
Ykw,
,

Rawhide bracers and belts
- Hickok -- the newest
in patterns and colors.
All 1.00.

I

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