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November 27, 1938 - Image 7

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1938-11-27

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NOV.27,1938

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Duke Maintains

erfect Record

By

Blanking Panthers,

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BRest Line I Ever Worked With,' Blocked Kick
Asserts Coach Clarence Munn Late In Game
By ARNOLD DANA Kodros. Archie is as dependable as Yields Score
The coaches' room on the second Old Faithful with his passing. Not
floor of the Administration Building once during the entire year did he ! - ' Lo Puts
was completely enveloped in dark- make a faulty pass. On the defense1 e Tpp ns ongflntst
ness with the exception of a square he's as smart as they come. At the Plas Superb Lineplayk
patch of white on which the plays of other guard spots are Brennan and I
last Saturday's Michigan-Ohio State Fritz. Brennan played his best year t Op Panthers Cold
game were being unfolded, of football this year as a senior, and I
Fritz, who is a sophomore, is a com- DURHAM, N.C., Nov. 26. --)---
Every now and then the film would er." Stocky Willard Perdue of Dukek
be alte reand aWith ea hu e nreru Janke Inspirational Leader I smashed through the weary Pitts-t
coach Clarence Munn would point , How was Janke as a captain?" burgh line and into football immor-
out where Heikkinen or Kodros or "Fred was an inspirational leader tality today.
Janke had sifted through the Buck- and one in whom all the boys placed The Duke end, alterate blocking,
eye line and trapped the runner be- a great deal of respect. As a tackle, back a year ago, banged into one of
hind the line of scrimmage. I think he is one of the best in the Big John Chickerneo's frequent punts
Enjoyable Season Ten.'', from the snow-covered end zone,
When the film had ended, a bar- "What about Siegel's knack of I grabbed it on the bounce and scored
rage of questions were fired at Coach blocking kicks, and Bill Smith's play the touchdown that defeated mighty
Munn regarding the 'setup of the in general?" Pitt for the Blue Devils, 7 to 0, and
Michigan line of 1938. "As far as Siegel goes, there is no ended the most remarkable season in
"What is your general opinion of explanation of why he always seems the history of Duke football.
the character Wolverine linemen?" Ito be the man to block the kick un- The touchdown, scored on the fifth
"Well, I can truthfully say that I less it is due to his aggressive nature play of the fourth quarter, sent the
have nevet spent a more enjoyable and brililant defensive play. Don 52,000 spectators into transports of
season as a coach. The players are played smart ball all season and de- joy and maintained the Blue Devils'
a great bunch of boys in every way, serves much credit. Bill Smith filled position as the nation's only major
inpositioniasythernation's onlyemajor
are good pupils, and never have I in splendidly for Captain Janke when undefeated, untied, unscored on
seen such a cooperative feeling among he was injured and next year he eleven. As the crowd, largest in
a group of players. For example, should develope greatly." southern gridiron history, filed out
whenever Janke and Siegel were in Who is the most versatile man on through the snow storm that had
game at tackle, Bill Smith would be the team? swirled into the stadium since morn-I
the most ardent rooter for one Freding, there was talk of the Rose Bowl.
them to break through." learned all the plays from four dif- the Sugar Bowl and almost every
Hleikkinen Outtanding ferent positions; both guards, left ps-esnfxue
Inyukinin s tackle, and when a center was need- sT on'fixt dDk
outstanding linesman?" ed, he also learned the plays from the Tipton's Punts Aid Duke
outsandng lnesan?' piot potBut if Purdue's touchdown won
"Well, it's very difficult to say, but the game, the trusty right foot of1
I should say Ralph Heikkinen. He is iEric (The Red) Tipton saved it. The
the greatest guard I have ever seen ae And nkStar senior tailback on Wallace Wade's
play football, and there is no doubt 20th and greatest eleven kept the
that he is of All-American calibre. In Baskethall Fill Blue Devils in and the Panthers out
He reached the peak of his play in of the ball game with 20 punts that
the Northwestern and Ohio State averaged 39.4 yards from scrimmaget
games." With regulars Eddie Thomas and and pinned the Pittsburgh backs in
"What about the other central po- Mike Sofiak granted the weekend off their own territory in the last quar-
sitions of the line, Coacli Munn?" to go home, Coaclf Bennie Ooster- ter.
"That's very easy to describe by baan inserted Dave Wood and Bob By then Jock Sutherland's elevenI
just looking at the record book. Not Palmer into his number one lineup which played through with only six
one touchdown was scored through yesterday and watched this aggrega- substitutions, was dog-tired. TwiceI
the line while the first or second tion defeat a reserve quintet 41 to 31. in the first half it had bid terrificallyr
string forward walls were in the The winners were paced by center hard for touchdowns, the great Mar-
game. Heil of course played one Jim Rae who scored 11 points and shall Goldberg leading the attacks
guard. Then at center is iron-man forward Charley Pink who connected with reckless and brilliant runnintz

Thirty-five members of the 1938 Jack Butler, Port Huron; George
freshman football squad have been Doolittle, Rocky River, Ohio; J. H.
awarded numerals for their work in Labadie, Wyandotte; Robert Smith,
the fall practice that has recently March Field, Cal.; and Herman Swer-
been completed. insky, Chicago. Ends: Charles Kralo-
Although this year's outfit has vec, La Grange, Ill.; Bill Schmidt,
been somewhat weaker than those of Gary, Ind.; John Sobesky, Detroit;
former years, according to Coach and Marshall Strenger, Lake Forest,
Wally Weber there are still a num- Ill. Backs: Joe Bosza, Pittsburgh,
ber of yearlings who will make good Pa.; Bob Zimmerman, St. Louis, Mo.;
material for the future Varsities. Al Thomas, Detroit; Norm Call, Nor-
Four Outstanding Me, walk, Ohio; Jim Grissom, Holland;
Fob rtandulgcfm AnnIRalphael Courtney, Elkhart, Ind.;
Bob Westfall, a ullback from Ann Bill Funk, Athens and Chuck Schmel-
Arbor, Bob Ingalls, a center fromin Saginaw.
Marblehead, Mass. who prepped at ng.
Kiski for a year, Bill Melzow, a guard
from Flint and Dave Nelson, a half-I 56-Year Old Grid Rivalry
back from Detroit, were the four out-
standing candidates on the squad. ! Ends In Scoreless Tie
Westfall and Nelson, each stand-
ing only five feet seven inches from ANNAPOLIS, Md., Nov. 26-IP-
the ground, are fast and shifty run- An inspired St. John's eleven, defeat-
ners, possessing triple threat abilities, ad in its four previous games this sea-
Ingalls, six foot two, and Melzow, at son, put a glorified finale on the his-
six foot even, are hard driving lines- toric college's Intercollegiate gridiron
men who are capable of filling the record today by fighting much-fav-
gaps that the graduati-g senior's will ored Johns Hopkins to a *coreless
leave in next year's Wolverine for- tie.
ward wall. Out-weighed 20 pounds to the man,
Other linemen who have shown the Johnnies "Midget" line thrice
definite promise arr Al Wistert, a turned back Hopkins threats within
six foot two inch end from Chicago. the 10-yard line, and in one last-
Ted Kennedy, a big flanker from uarter spree the heretofore power-
Saginaw, George Ostroot, a 200- less lightweights smashed their way
pound tackle from Cilborg, S.D., and to the enemy's 10.
Bob Thomas, the rough and tough The game ended a 56-year rivalry
Muskegon product. between the schools. St. John's has
Backs Need Speed abolished Intercollegiate athletics, ef-
In the backfield, Arnold Salvater- fective at the end of this school year.
ran, an All-Ohio candidate from Bel- -.._.__.
laire, and Harris Roberts, the Kiski
graduate from Shaker Heights, O.
have shown possibilities but have
proved too slow to provide much of a
threat in the Conference. I'A
Mar Weber, the Saginaw flash, and
George Purcell, a 200 pound half- M PA N Y
back from Marshall, have been ham- p
pered by injuries all fall and didn't(
get a chance to show their talents in -
practice.
Other Numeral Winners
Others who won numerals were : PROFESS IO N A L
center: John Wilson, M o n r o e. 0 E X T E R MIN A T I N G
Guards: Ted Denise, Lansing; Earle T E E P H oNE
Hoyt4 Grosse Point Park; John Laine,
Puritan; Steve Marrone, Detroit;
John Stover, Milwaukee. Tackles:

To 35

"I

Buy your gifts early
before the
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There are still a few Orien-
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selection of hand-carved
wooden gifts, beautiful brass
trays and unique jewelry.
ORIENTAL
GIFT SHOP
300 - B South State Street
Telephony 2-3600

for 10. Russ Dobson showed good and deadly blocking,
form for the second squad and sopho- !. Goldberg Hurt
more guards Herb Brogan and Harold Each time the surge fell short. The
Westerman were finding the basket solid, seaworthy Duke line halted the
oftener than in the past few days. first savage charge on the ten. The
Bill Cartmill, sophomore forward, second failed when Larry Peace, re-
was out of action with a bad knee and placement for the injured Goldberg,
with three or four gridders still to fumbled on the 19.
report, Coach Oosterbaan was short- Goldberg was the spearhead of
handed and unable to stage a second each drive. The first time he made
scrimmagenfirst downs on the Pitt 31 and 46,
John Nicholson, towering end from 1pounded out two more on the Duke
the football squad, reported Friday to 39 and 24 and then smashed out the
join mates Paul Nielsen and Milo
.last.on tt heMten
I.C'xilrln nhn a~mp nit.1ltf nr~v --- - _

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11

bukup wno came ouum onaay.
H. W. CLARK
English Boot and Shoe Maker
Our new repair department, the
best in the city. Prices are right.
438 South State and Factory on
South Forest Avenue.

I, ,

r1

Our full line of CHRISTMAS CARDS are now
available. Call TOM HARMON for samples. c
RAMSAY-KE R N
Pri ter S
National Bank Building Phone 7900
> -wtoc <-a<> < o acsc<-yc) < yomto - 5

This wholesale devastation of the
Duke tackles and guards went for
naught. The Duke forwards stopped
Dick Cassiano cold on two reverses.
Goldberg's wobbly pass to Bill Daddio
was incomplete and then a horde of
blue jerseys buried Curly Stebbins oh
the 12-yard line and Duke had the
ball..
The lineups:
Pittsburgh Pos. Duke
Daddio LE Perdue
Merkovsky LT Ribar
Klein LG Johnson
Dannies C Hill
Petro RG Yorker
Konetsky RT Haasj
Hoffman RE Bailey
Chickerneo QB Spanglez
Cassiano LH Eave-
Stebbins RH Tipton
Goldberg FB O'Mar,-
Duke scoring, Perdue: Point afte-
touchdown, Ruffa (sub for Davis)
placement.
Pittsburgh, substitutions, E n d
I Goodridge; Guards, Le Zouski, Grad-
isek; Backs, Naric, Peace, Sekela.
D u k e, Ends, Darnell, Marion:
Tackles, Winterson, Maloney; Guard
Baskervill; Backs, Robiison, Georgf:
McAfee, Davis, Ruffa.
Referee, Paul MaGoffin (Michi
gan); Umpire, Walter E. Dunn, (un
attached); Field Judge, E. T. Sanders
(Washington and Lee); Headlines-
man, G. W. Hoban (Dartmouth).

Stubborn Bulldog Eleven
Hof-ls Georgia Tech
BOSTON, Nov. 26.-(A)-The pow-
erful Ioly Cross Crusaders, apparent-
ly inspired by the wavering attitude I
of Coach Eddie Anderson toward his
lucrative Iowa bid, today smote the
Boston College Eagles for a 29-7 vic-
tory before 35,000 chilled football
fans.
That decisive set-back, far from
unexpected, was the first Boston
College suffered this season, althiough
it had been tied by Temple and St:
Anselm's. From start to finish Capt.
Bullet Bill Osmanski paced the Cru-
saders' army of fleet ball-carriers
through their ancient Jesuit rivals'
powerful wall and when they want-
ed to pause to catch their second
vinds, Ronnie Cahill obliged them by
:ossing 19 passes, eight of which were
^ompleted for a tota'l of 85 yards.
The hitherto unbeaten Eagles were
ut-played and out-fought during
he greater part of the action.

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ATHENS, Ga., Nov. 26.-(P)-- Out-
)ayed throughout, but rising to great
defensive heights when their goal line
was threatened, Georgia's Bulldogs
lcattled Georgia Tech to an 0-0 tie
today for the second straight year
with the odds overwhelmingly against
them.
A year ago it was 6 to 6 when
Georgia Tech was expected to breeze
along to an easy triumph. The situ-
ation was the same today. Georgia
Tech could not carry across the pay-
off stripe after thrice penetrating in-
to the shadows of the goal posts.
Georgia had only a defense. Tech
rolled up 242 yards rushing to thc
Bulldog's 26 and 161 first downs
against four.

l!

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FOR MORE
Skatng Pleasure
Hardened Steel Blade Tubulars
BOYS'. .$4.50 MEN'S. .$4.95
Black Shoe, Brown Trim, Hard Box Toe.
WOMEN'S WHITE SETS.$4.50 up
Five FREE Sharpenings this season
with Skate Purchase.

:;,
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2i

4 Galoshes
Re-heeled
Carriage boots
Repaired
* Invisible Half
Soling

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