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September 27, 1938 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1938-09-27

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[H E M ICH I G A N D A I SY TUESDAY, SEPT. 27. 1938
Hitler Re-Afirms October 1 Deadline For Czech Murphy 0 T Seek
Fnnds At Capitol
Capitulation To His Demands For SudetenlandDETRo=T, Set. 2.-UP)-Seekin
. immediate allotment of funds .fo

(Continued from Page to the cession of German territory
Prime Minister Neville Chamberlain, in Czechoslovakia. Benes agreed;
with an urgent note. 'yes, these. regions must be ceded.
tin London Sr Horace was report-. "But what did he de? He did not
ed to have told Hitler that Britain cede he region, but drove the Ger-
and Russia would join France in mans out."t
support of Czechoslovakia in event Then, after telling of a daily in-1
Germany invades Czechoslovakia. creasein the number of refugees en-
(Even while the Reichsfuehrer was tering Germany from Czechoslovakia,
speaking, Great Britain made it plain and stating the total number now
in diplomatic quarters that she, Rus- had reached 214,000, Hitler said:

Czechoslovak rule for further perse-
cution."
Then, nine minutes after the first,
came the second climax of the
speech:
"But he must cede this region to us
by Oct. 1."
For a full minute there ras a deaf-
ning din of cheers.
"I am grateful," continued Hitler,
"to Mr. Chamberlain for all his ef-
forts. I assured him the German peo-
ple want nothing but peace, but that
there were linitts beyond which we
cannot go.
"I assured him that when the
Czechoslovaks had peacefully settled
their difficulties with their other na-

tionalities, Czechoslovakia no long-
er interested me."
Now Hitler, nearing the close, spoke
faster, in high-pitched tones, and
was interrupted with frequent clam-
orous cheers.
"I offered Benes the legalization of
what he agreed to do. Does he want
war or pace?
"The Sudeten Germans will now
take the liberty denied them for 20
years. Germans are a different peo-
ple from what they were in 1918.
"We are cured of the democracy of
those days.
"In this hour, the whole German
people will unite behind me
(Continued on Page 3)

sa, and France had agreed upon
such a course).
But the gist of the entire impas-'
sioned oration was that he would act,
he would do something, if he did not
have the Sudetenland by Oct. 1-
this Saturday.

Whole stretches of land are be-
ing depopulated, yet Benes is sitting
in Prague and thinks nothing can
happen to him, for behind him stand
England and France.
"I believe the moment has now
come for talking business."
'This was the first clim ax of -the

The background for the Reichs- address, after the Fuehrer had been
fuehrer's address was a series of speaking 53 minutes. A -tumultuous
events which had brought Europe shout rang to the roof of the Sport-
closer to war than at any time since palast asHitler paused. Then he con-
the orldWartinued:

The final chapters were Czecho-
slovakia's agreement, under French
and British pressure, to cede Ger-
many the Sudetenland; the second
talk, at Godesberg, Germany, between
Hitler and Chamberlain; issuance of
Hitler's "final" terms for peace ,with
Czechoslovakia, involving t urning
over of the Sudetenland by Oct. 1;
Czechoslovakia's mobilization; far-
reaching war preparations by Francel
and Britain; and finally Sir Horace
Wilson's mission today.1
Hitler frequently and bitterly at-i
tacked President Benes, describing
him as a liar and a promise-breaker.
"I hoped," Hitler declared, "until
the last moment that Benes would
recede from the unreasonableness of
his position.
"Benes, however, thought he could
do anything he pleased to Germany,
for he was protected by Britain and
France.
"And if everything else went
wrong, there was still Russia.
"I told Chamberlain plainly what
I consider is the only solution; that
I was not the man to look on in-
differently when 3,500,000 Germans
were maltreated; that there comes a
moment when the word is 'enough.'
"France and England finally agreed

"My memorandum (given Cham-
berlain at Godesberg to relay to
Prague) is the last and final one. It is
nothing but a realization of what
Benes has promised.
"All parts that went to join the
Reich must join now, immediately.
"I have decided that we shall place
this land under German sovereignty.
"The final outlining of the border,
however, I gladly give to the citizens
there. I will use the Saar status as a
basis for a plebiscite there.
"I am ready and have been ready
for a plebiscite to be conducted in
Czechoslovakia.
"But that is where Benes and his
friends balked. I was even ready to
have a plebiscite carried out by an
international control commission.
"I was also ready to have the Ger-
man-Cdechoslovak frontier 1 a t e r
agreed upon- by a joint? German-
Czechoslovak commission.
"What is the memorandum but a
realization of Czechoslovak promises?
And yet Benes says it creates a new
situation and wants to shuffle out
of his promises.
"Benes understood it this way-

A HAPPY THOUGHT FOR THRIFTY COLLEGIANS
- SEND your weekly laundry
home byhandyRpilwcuyfxpress

al

Right from your college rooms and return, conveniently.
economically and fast, with no bother at all. lust phone
our local college agent when to come for the bundle. He'll
call for it promptly-whisk it away on speedy express
trains, to your city or town and return the home-
done product to you-alt without extra charge-the
whole year through. Rates for this famous college
service are low.ana you can send coltec. you know
(only by Railway Express, by the way). It's a very
popular method and adds to the happy thought.
Phone our agent today. He's a good man to know.
Ann Arbor RR. Depot. 420 S. Ashley St. Ph. 7101
Depot office: Mich. Central RR.
Phone 5714, Ann Arbor, Mich
EXPRESS
AGENCY, iNC.

Bcn and Sama, oiSly .au .'V
. .ktage Play Prpductd by George Abbtt}
Soa''ing
and PAT OBRIEN
with MARIE WILSON
RALPH BELLAMY + FRANK McHUGH * DICK
lORAN . Directed by LLOYD BACON
Screen Ptay by Bena and Samuel Spewack
A WARNER BROS. PICTUIRE
EXTRA
LEON E R ROL
in
"T H E JITTERS"
Matinees 2-3:50 ...5c
Nights, 7-9 . .3....5c
Coming Thursday
Edw. G Robinson
in "I AM TH E LAW"

e
.{
'', "' '

O NATION-WIDE RAIL-AIR SERVICE

that this region will be
the German account, but1
be returned, and instead

credited to
t would not
kept under

U

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