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November 16, 1938 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1938-11-16

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Prof. Bromage Spewaks On Sate Gov't.

Secret Of Radio Remote Control DILY OFFICIAL
ExplainedBy Prof. Lewis Holland BULLETIN
By KARL KESSLER phone and a small "sending set" of WEDNESDAY, NOV. 16, 1938
Most spectacular of the labor-sav- sufficient power to be effective only VOL. XLIX. No. 45
ing devices incorporated in new radio within a radius of 100 feet. The
models is the mysterious remote con- transmitting wave-length of this set Notices
trol, which makes it possible to tune is slightly higher than that used in To All Faculty Members and Staff:
the radio from any -part of the house commercial broadcasting. ToAl Eacltyme s and Staff:
by means of a small control box. In the radio set proper, a small re- Special Employment Time Reports
This control box has no visible cie ue otesm ae must be in the Business Office on
onto o an s ceiver tuned to the same waveTuesday, Nov. 22, to be included in
connection to the radio, and as the length as the portable transmitter is the roll for Nov. 30
manufacturer advertises, it has a built into the rear of the radio cab- Edna G. Miller Payroll Clerk.
mysterious control over the radio. bint
The secret of this "mysterious" de- Wet.
vice, Prof. Lewis N. Holland of the When one wishes to select a station
EieriS. Lewi.llmaed, is ae by means of this device, it is only Freshmen from the following
Engineering School illuminated, is a ncsayt unteda ntecn schools are reminded of the confer-
weak portable radio transmitter. The necessary to turn the dial on the con-scolarreiddfthcne-
portable ontro boxontanst Ta e b trol box to the station desired. As ences with their principals in the
portable control box contains a bat- the dial is turned, a series of im- Horace H. Rackham School of Grad-
tery, a dial similar to that on a tele- pulses are sent out by the miniature uate Studies Thursday; Nov. 17:
transmitter, corresponding in num- Albion, Ann Arbor, Battle Creek,
ber to the station desired. These im- Bay City, Belleville, Birmingham,
ers Irant pulses are then picked up by the Bronson, Caro, Chelsea, Coldwater,
radio set, and by means of a series Cranbrook, Dearborn, Detroit (Cass,
Cl ' ci est of sensitive relays, the proper station Central, Cooley, Country Day, Denby,
11c is selected. Eastern, Mackenzie, Miss Newman's,
In a similar manner, it is possible Northeastern, Northern, Northwes-
Student Cast Will Repeat to change the volume by turning the tern, Pershs. Redford, Southeas-
dial "louder" or "softer" and holding
'The Fickle Widow' it there until the desired volume is ter, Dowagiac, Eat Grand Rapids,
East Lansing, Elyr:.. , Fenton, Fern-
An anonymous play, "The Fickle r The convenience of this device is dale, Flint, Ft. Wayne, Grosse Pointe,
Widow," will be presented in Adrian obvious-at last we have found a way Hamtramck, Highland Lan',Howell,
Friday by University students before to turn down that noisy radio next Jackson, Kingswood, Lansie C,Lin-
the Lenawee County Federation of door without resorting to a shotgun. Marshall, Monroe, Mt. Clemns,
Women's Clubs. Northville, Northwestern Military and
The play, which was presented over " Naval Academy, Oak Park, Owosso,
Nt a si Oct. 22. on the Stories of All Faculty Active Plymouth, Pontiac, Port Huron, River
Nations series, atr dhRouge, Rochester, Royal Oak, Sagi-
'ion of listeners 'of Lenawee County1 . o v n i n nw oeoD~lisadLbe)
tosuchanextnttha teyseta A t Conventions $ now oled ld k and e , ,
request that the entire cast present andotte, Ypsilanti:
the play there, according to Prof. Ira M. Smith, Registrar.
Waldo M. Abbot, director of the1' oinage T l''d County
University Broadcasting Service. Government Discussion Upperclssmen: Former students
Those who will make the trip are Uperlasen:_ore___tdet
ProfessorAbbot,_JeromeWiesner,_of the junior colleges at Bay City,
Professor Abbot, Jerome Wiesner,1 As two other faculty members were Flint, Grand Rapids, Highland Park
technician, James Barton, Grad., returned from convention trips, it and Port Huron are reminded of the
Mary Rall, '39, Ben Wampler, 39A' was announced that Prof. Arthur W. conferences with the deans in the
Joseph Graham, '39; Ethel Sawnson, Bromage of the political science de- Lecture Hall of the Horace H. Rack-
Grad. Harold Gstr'9,admabel partment would serve as chairman of ham Schools of Graduate Studies on
Johnson. The story was dramatized the County Government Round Table Thursday morning, Nov. 17. Any
by Esther Kern, Grad. at the National Municipal League's other students from these colleges,
convention beginning Dec. 3 in Balti- who may not have been notified by
smore, Md mail, and all other former students :of
. N Prof. F. L. Everett of the engineer (Continued on Page 4)

Prof. Arthur W. Bromage of the political science department spoke
yesterday on "Problems of State Government" before a graduate lunch-
eon of the Chemical and Metallurgical Engineering Department ,in
3201 East Engineering Building. During his discourse, Professor Brom-
age mentioned the Grosbeck Plan of the State of Michigan's Adminis-
trative Organization.

Jobs Available
In Education,
States Purdom
500 Job Applicants Shown
Need For Broad Training
Improving Personalities1
"Every man with a PhD in English
or Education had at least ten chances1
for a job last year," Luther T. Pur-
dom, director of the Bureau of Ap-
pointments, told 500 job applicants
Tuesday in the Rackham building
auditorium.
The University does injustice to
many persons, said Mr. Purdom, by
placing too much emphasis on teach-
ing people facts and not enough on
improving their personality. This lack
of personality prevents many young
people from obtaining the position
they desire, he declared.
"Our bureau is anxious to aid uni-
versity students in securing informa-
tion about vocations before they con-
centrate," he stated.
Mr. Purdom pointed out that therd
are three or four teaching fields where
there is a scarcity of available em-
ployees; namely teachers for elemen-
tary grades in art, commercial sub-
jects, and wood-working. There is a
surplus of teachers for social sciences
and English.
A lunmi Collecting
Gayley'sWritings
The University of Michigan Club
of East San Francisco Bay, California,
is collecting all available writings of
the late Prof. Charles Mills Gayley,
composer of "The Yellow and Blue."
The collection is to be placed in the
University Historical Collections when
assembled.
A graduate of the University of
Michigan, the professor taught here
until 1889, when he left to join the
faculty of the University of California
at Berkeley. Professor Gayley also
wrote the lyrics for "Laudes Atque
Carmina" and "Goddess of the In-.
land Seas."
Bare-Legged Majorettes
Bamined At Oregon State
Poor Oregon State! No more bare-
legged drum majorettes. The ad-
ministration has spoken-either skirts
covering the knees or slacks. Not only
was color added to the band, but
pride in the college interest in-
creased since the advent of the pretty
leaders. The student body of
4,000-odd protest that their own so-
ciology professors have found the
youth of today cleaner mentally so
why the ban on "revealing uniforms"
that expose a foot of bare skin be-
tween boot top and skirt? Oregon
Staters will find out too how conven-
iently deaf an inflexible administra-
tion can be.
-Rewrite and collection from
Oregon State Barometer, Nov.
10, 1938.
Dentistry Talks Continued
Dean Russell W. Bunting of the
dentistry school will continue the cur-
rent series of vocational lectures and
discussions sponsored by the Union
from 4:30 to 5:30 p.m. tomorrow
in the smal ballroom of the UnionI
Students are invited to attend and
take part in the discussion,
NEW DiSTINCTIVE 1]

Band Marches
To Go On Air
DescripAion Of Fornations
To Be Given By NBC
Plans to broadcast the music and
description of the marching forma-
tions of the Michigan Band at Ohio
State Stadium next Saturday (Nov.
19) are being completed by the Na-
tional Broadcasting Company, Prof.
William D. Revelli, director of the
Michigan Bands, announced yester-
day.
The trip to Columbus will be the
second appearance of the band away
from the home gridiron. The Ohio
trip is being made under the auspices
of the Buick Motor Company of Flint
A special routing of busses and a spe-
cial train to convey the contingent of
135 musicians to and from Columbus
will leave Ann Arbor at 7 a.m. and re-
turn by way of Plymouth, at 11
p.m. Saturday.
The support of the Buick Moto
Company was obtained chiefly
through the efforts of a Michigar
alumnus, Michael Gorman, editor b
the Flint Journal, A large crowd o
Flint rooters is expected to make th
journey to view Michigan's effort
to end a successful season with Ac
tory.
The Michigan-Ohio State gam
will be the highlight of Ohio Stat
University's homecoming celebratior
and special formations and music an
being rehearsed by the band for tha
event. These are being kept secret
said Professor Revelli.
Insurance Mathematics
Subject Of Actuarial Tall
Dr. T. N. E. Greville, of the Uni
versity of Michigan mathematics de
partment, will deliver a lecture im
Angell Hall tonight on the subject o
insurance mathematics. The lectur
will be the first of a series which i
being sponsored by the Michigar
Actuarial Society. A. G. Garbriel, o
Detroit, who is president of the Society
will introduce Dr. Greville.
1 OTC Instructor Speaks
So New York Legion Pos
Col. Leon A. Fox, instructor of th
University Reserve Officers Trainin
Corps medical unit will speak Frida
before the Cadeuceus Post of th
American Legion in New York City
The Legion Post is composed of medi
cal men. Col. Fox will deliver his ad
dress on wartime conditions in nort
China.

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6a
P-rogressive U nity
Will Halt Fascism
WASHINGTON, Nov. 15 -A-)-
Secretary of Agriculture Wallace said
tonight that farmers and workers
must unite behind "progressive ele-
ments" in government or a "new con-
servative majority" would force some
form of industrial fascism on the
United States.
In an address prepared for delivery
before the national conference on
labor legislation, the Cabinet officer
said last week's elections showed a
"misconception of labor objectives
and methods" on the part of many
farmers and small-town residents,
New Nickels Turn Pink
WASHINGTON, Nov. 15 -U)-~
Some of the new Jefferson nickels
which made their debut today turned
out to be pink.
T. J. Quirk, assayer of the mint,
explained that the hue was due to
surface oxidation, and would wear
off quickly when the coins were
handled.

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MOTION PICTURES All

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- IVj-IU V asANY' - " MUM= f~Dp~.

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