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November 10, 1938 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1938-11-10

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Consulate With Spanish- Club Heads

against Japan, when our country is it- try.
I He's one of a litter of six fox pups
self helping to arm that nation, de- of normal silver fox parents at the
Glared Dr. Walter Judd, medical mis- I Thomas C. Tiley Fox Rranch at Com-
sionary in China, in a speech made merce Lake. So the rest are going
Friday night in the Congressional about the business of having other fox
Church under the auspices of the pups this season before their pelts be-
American League for Peace and De- come evening capes, while Dofey is
mocracy. pampered by A.K.L.'s and their dates
We are being hypocritical when we since his pelt is brown and woolly and
pass resolutions condemning Japan there's still some doubt as to whether
for doing that which she couldn't he'd be father or mother if he were
do without our help, he said, for it is used for breeding purposes . (The
our arms, our bullets and our trucks "he" is just a convenient expres-
which are devastating China today. sion).
Outlining a four-fold plan of action Technically, there's not a very
for the United States, Dr. Judd advo- complete explanation for Dofey.
r-b a rniimm.r hrnrnti f Tann- University museum zoologists, on cas-

Saul R. Levin, co'nsulate for several Latin American countries, yester-
day told 400 members of La Sociedad Hispanica and townspeople that the
countries he represented were misrepresented in the Northern Hemi-
sphere. Margaret Carr, '40, vice-president of the club, Mr. Levin, Mar-
garet Bryant, '39, treasurer, Carmen McKell, '39, secretary, Prof. Ermel-
indo .A. Mercado of the -Romance Language department and Alfred
Hoover, '39, president, are shown /in the corridor of the Rackham
Building.

Nation And State
Swept By GOP
Farley Says Results Were
AnticipatedAs Offset
(Continued from Page 1)
of the party, construed the tabula-
tions as meaning that "thousands of
Democrats joined in the protest
against the Roosevelt policies which
were wrecking their party and their
country."
But Po'stmaster General Farley
chairman of the Democratic National
Committee, had his own and con-
trasting interpretation of the returns.
The election, he said, showed an an-
ticipated "falling off from the unpre-
cedented pluralities of 1936." He add-
ed, however, that the party "won
substantial majorities in the Senate
and House," and picked up governor-
ships in Maryland and California,
although gubernatorial losses were
more than had been expected.
"I think the outcome justifies the
statement that the country as a
whole is still strongly behind the
humanitarian policies of President
Roosevelt," he said.
The election left Republican
charges hanging fire that New Deal
candidates had misused the influence
of WPA checks for the unemployed,
particularly in Pennsylvania, (which
PLAY PRODUCTION
presents
AT LAWV"V
By ELMER RICE
The moving play that Paul Muni
made famous.
MENDELSSOHN THEATRE
OPENING TONIGHT
Thursday, Friday, and Saturday
Nov. 10-11-12 - 8:30 P.M.
Reserved Seats --75c, 50c, 35c
Phone 6300

Progressive Mexico
Misunderstood Here,
Representative Says
Although the Mexican people are
on the whole poor, many brighter
aspects of that country never reach
the Northern countries, Saul R. Levin,
legal representative of Mexico and
Cuba in the State and honorary Con-
sul for the Republic of Honduras,'
told La Sociedad Hispanica as he
backed his point with movies, last
night in Hill Auditorium.
Mr. Levin's movies included scenes
from Mexico City, Tasco, Oaxaca,
Puebla and Cuernavaca, as well as
from the poverty-stricken Mexican
countryside. His shots of the capital
city contrasted the new and the old
ideas in what he called a rapidly
progressing nation.
In many of the scenes he showed
how nationalistic Mexico has become
in the last quarter-century. Almost
every public building, including cathe-
drals, museums and palaces, was
called "national." Everywhere are
seen monuments to the revolution, to
liberty, and to various "liberators,"
he said..
The speaker, pointing to this vast
new world of untapped resources,I
concluded with an admonition to all

Judaism History
Traced y Rabbi
Dr. Rabinowitz Predicts
Disintegration Ahead
The Judaism which has survived
from the time of Moses Maimonides
is slowly disintegrating because of
forces outside of it, Dr. Isaac Rabino-
witz of Hillel Foundation told stu-
dents and townspeople gathered at
Lane Hall last evening. The first blow
struck at the segregation of Jewish
thought and custom was largely'
through the coming of the Industrial
Revolution while the administrationE
of the Code Napoleon continued the
disruption of the ghetto, Dr. Rabino-
witz explained.
There has been a tremendous re-
vival of interest in Jewish thought
and custom on the part of Jews in
Germany because of the rise of fasc-
ism and its attendant persecutions
declared Dr. Rabinowitz. In Russia,
he continued, at the beginning of the
revolution, many Jews who belonged
to the middle class were disinherited

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college students to look to Latin by the Bolsheviks; but with the adop-
America as the place to find future tion of the constitution which pro-
great trade and business opportuni- vides for religious freedom, Dr. Rab-
ties. inowitz was of the opinion that there

Ariistice Day
Plans Form'ed
Ann Arbor VFW To Hold
Memorial Services
A program in observance of Armis-
tice Day Friday, including a memorial
service and banquet has been planned
by the Ann Arbor chapters of the
Veterans of Foreign Wars, the Dis-
abled American Veterans, and the
American Legion for tomorrow.
Memorial services will take place at
11 a.m. at the Unitarian Church, the
Rev. H. P. Marley of that church and
the Rev. Charles W. Brashares of the
First Methodist Church directing.
This service is open to all veterans
and to the public.
At noon an Armistice Day luncheon
banquet will be held at the Michigan
Union, Prof. John H. Muyskens, of
the speech department, acting as
chairman. Prof. Joseph R. Hayden of
the political science department will
speak.
The luncheon is under the auspices3
of the Last Man Club, the disabled
veterans of Washtenaw County.

would be a new impetus toward re-
ligion on the part of all Russians.
In the United States Judaism is in
transition stated Dr. Rabinowitz. Be-
cause the way of life in America
makes many customs and traditions
difficult to retain, some sort of syn-
thesis must be achieved. 1
Cinema League Revives
Chaney Movie Of 1925
"The Unholy Three," with Lon
Chaney and Victor McLaglen, will be
shown at 8:15 p.m. Sunday at the
Lydia Mendelssohn Theatre under
the auspices of the Art Cinema
League.
This film, produced in 1925, is one
of a series of post-war American and
Swedish films being shown by the
League. Tickets for the series can
be obtained at the Michigan League.
Guest Carillonneur Here
Percival Price, guest carilloneur,
will play a varied program on the
Baird Carillon at 3:00 p.m., Sunday,
Nov. 13. The program will include a
group of Negro spirituals, operatic
selections, folk dances with improvi-
sations and selections from the works
of Tschaikowsky.

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