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October 26, 1938 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1938-10-26

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Hankow Razed
By Fire; Japs
Clamor At Gate
U.S. Gunboat Lands Squad
Of Marines To Guard
American Properties
(Continued from Page 1)
Hankow all but vanished when the
Military Council, following the depar-
ture of Generalissimo Chiang. Kai-
Shek, announced that the Hankow
area which also includes Hanyang
and Wuchang would not be defended.
A spokesman said the Chinese com-
mand was unwilling to risk its main
forces "to be annihilated." This, he
said, was in keeping with the funda-
mental Chinese policy of prolonged
warfare which does not attach im-
portance to holding particular posi-
tions or cities.
Thus far, explosions and fires which
accompanied the Chinese withdrawal
were not reported to have injured
any of the three cities 1,500 foreign
population or their property.;
Up to the time this dispatch was
filed, the American consulate general:
gave the assurance that the three
cities' 125 Americans were safe.
Offcial foreign representation was
believed to have averted a Chinese
threat to blow up Japanese buildings
in. the former British and Russian,
concessions where most of the British
and American residents had taken
refuge.
German Club
HoldsMeeting
Dances And Songs Feature
Evening'sProgram
German folksongs and folkdances
featured the meeting of the Deutscher
Verein last night at the Michigan
League. The Verein is a student Ger-
mhan organization and holds meet-
ings every other Tuesday evening
throughout the school year-.
Prof. Werner F. Striedieck of the
German department and faculty ad-
viser to the Verein, led the 50 students
present in several German folksohgs
and Mrs., Striedieck demonstrated a
German folkdance involving much
stamping of the floor and waving of

8 Former'Michi
Active In Sino

gan Students State Develops.
Japanese Scene New Agencies
Groesbeck Plan Introduces
Twenty In 17 Years
More than 20 new agencies have
been created in Michigan since ther
introduction of the Groesbeck plan ofc
1921 for the modernization of stated
government, Prof. Arthur W. Brom-
age of the political science declared s
at dinner meeting last night of thes
Advisory Council of the Detroit Citi-
zens League.{
Speaking at the Detroit Y.W.C.A.,
Professor Bromage, who is Secretary
of the Commission on Reform and c
Modernization of Government' said
E that 26 states have made basic or par-(
tial changes in their administrative
structures.
In 1937 no general reorganizations
was made in Michigan, Professor Bro-1
Tsui-fung Wong (standing at left) image said, but of major significance
graduated from Michigan in 1927 with was the creation of three important
a M.A. degree. She is now dean of departments, civil service, corrections
and hospitals, and the attempted re-
women at Lingan University, Canton, organizatioi of welfare functions.
China. Miss Wong is also directing!
Canton's municipal social work.
Another of the Barbour scholars is Celebration To Be Held
Shan-ming Tao (standing second By Scabbard And Bladei
from left) who fornierly was a director
S ar n rTo commemorate Army Day in Ann.
of a large government laboratoryj i Arbor, Scabbard and Blade, R.O.TC.
producing preventive medicines. She honorary society, will hold a flag
attended the University of Michigan lowering ceremony at 5:30 p.m. to-.
from 1921 toa1924. The following year morrow followed by a formal dinner .
she served as bacteriologist in the at 6:15 p.m. at the Union.
Michigan Department of Health, then Capt. William Colby, '39E, will lead
went to The Johns Hopkins University the drill.
where she received the degree of Doc -___

Eight former students of the Uni-
versity of Michigan are now playing
important roles in the present Sino-
Japanese conflict, according to word
received recently by Prof. W. Carl
Rufus of the astronomy department,
executive secretary of the Barbour
Scholarship committee.
Above are shown these eight with
Mme. Chiang Kai-shek, wRife of
China's generalissimo, 'who appears
with them at a conference of fifty-
four leading Chinese women called in
the first part of the summer at Kuling,4
China, to discuss the work of the
women' of the country in the present
situation. "It is interesting to note,
said Professor Rufus," that the Uni-
versity of Michigan had the largest
delegation at the conference, and that
seven of the -eight from here were
Barbour scholars."
The Universitysof Michigan delega-
tion at the conference is pictured
above with Mme. Chiang Kai-shek
(standing third from left.)
Two of the outstanding leaders at
the conference were Dr. Yi-fang Wu
and Dr. Lucy Wang. Dr. Wu, (stand-
ing at the extreme right), is now
president of Ginling College, former-
ly located at Nanking but because of
the present situation of the country
has been moved to Chengtu, Szechuan
Province. Dr. Wu attended the Uni-
versity of Michigan from 1922 to
1928, receiving the degree of Ph.D.
in biology.
Dr. Lucy Wang (seated in the cen-
ter), is president of Hwa Nan Col-
lege which was moved from Foochow
to Nanping, Fulkien Province. Dr.
Wang enrolled in the University in
1921 and graduated with the degree of
M.S. in chemistry in 1923. She re-
turned in 1928 as a Barbour Fellow.
Dr. Wang was one of the first to whom
Mme. Chiang Kai-shek extended an
invitation to the Kuling conference.

Electricity, Lamps, Water Tanks
Used In Therapeutic Treatments
(This is the last of two articles deal- behind the nozzle. As the water rushes c]
ing with the physiotherapy department out, it creates a partial vacuum in the 14
of the University Hospital.) tube, and the air rushing in forces
By RICHARD P. HARMEL the water out of the nozzle with great- d
Nerve injuries, rickets, extra-pul- i er force. This equipment is used for
monry ubeculsi an wond ase lwound casesI (often salt is added to ,N
monary tuberculosis and wound cases h e oata lasn gn
the water to act as a cleansing agent), fet
can all be treated by the 9hyiotherapy arthritis and for paralytics when the u
department of the University Hospital, pool is considered too cold.
Miss Mary Castle, chief technician, Psychology is brought into play in
said yesterday.IPscooyibruhinopa.n=a
Electrotherapy is the treatment of the corrective gymnasium, by means t'
such ailments as certain forms of of a blackboard used for arm exer- g
paralysis and nerve injuries by means cise. Patients are given chalk and
of electric currents. Faradic current, told to draw arcs. Human nature is o
she pointed out, is used for electro- such, she explained, that the patient u
muscular diagnosis before nerve de- will attempt to draw each subsequent a(
generation has set in while Galvanic arc higher and wider, thus gaining -.
current is used for the same purpose the maximum of benefit. b
after nerve degeneration has taken The most common fallacy people t
place. After the nerves degenerate, entertain about the physiotherapy de- N
it is impossible to use the Faradic partment, Miss Castle believes, is the t
current because muscles having lost
their nerve supply are unable to re- PCAE
spond to the repeated shocks supplied OIONb t.Teduain fechsok
by it. The duration of each shock,
she continued, is not sufficient to 3 DAYS ONLY
cause a contraction. Sinusoidal cur- - STARTING TODAY! -
rent gives artificial exercise. to a
muscle by rhythmically contracting
and relaxing it.
Rickets, wounds, acne, extra-pul- I
monary tuberculosis and general de-
bility are treated in the heliotherapy
unit. Three types of ultra-violet ray
lamps (one water-cooled, two air-
cooled and one carbon arc) are used.
Hydrotherepeutic treatment does to -tat
not cease with the swimming pool,
Miss Castle explained, because there I
is also an outer room in which body,
leg and arm tanks of the whirlpool Helen BRODERK
type are found. These operate. on anGlnaFRELSmeS
air suction principle, due to -a long Glenda FARRELLNSamue
hollow tube that rises. a few inches ,ANE YN VERS
E O U B E
8 Doors North of Kresge's k
TOBER 26, 1938
35c PREP ETRA
EXR
Tube or Jar IXTRA
"PEI PING, LAND OF KHAI
14+c__ _- COVIING SA
imins - Buy for less at Marshall's DION N E QUINTS

.U nd d h U fY~ &

w,

tor of Science.
Yu-Yuen Chen, (seated at the
right) is the only onV of the Michigan
delegates at the conference who is
.not a Barbour scholar. At the present
time Miss Chen is principal of a
large provincial school for girls at
Canton.
Barbour Fellowships are awarded
to oriental women of noteworthy
achievement in scholarship and ser-
vice in the Orient. At the present
time, according to Professor Rufus,
there are nearly 200 Barbour schol-
ars scattered in the world.

I

MARS HALL
CUT-RATE DRUG STORI
231 South State Street
EFFECTIVE OC

MICHAEL WHALEN'
LYNN BARI
MARVIN STEPHENS
HENRY ARMETTA
CHICK CHANDLER
SIDNEY BLACKMER

50 Pads of
Book Matches
B ySc
Build up .your resistance with, vitat

_ -°

I

N"- NEWS OF THE DAY

J

ATURDAY
"F IVE OF A KIND"

,. ~ __ _ _

THE

gram committee was appoint-
it will be their duty tq provide
nment for the future meet-
Some suggestions for enter-
it include; hikes, dances in
rman style, sings, plays and

I

- - rdI

La

a:-

MICHIGAN

-:-

STARTING TODAY
Stage and Screen Combined Show!
HE WAS TALL, DARK, HANDSOME
AND /

THURSDAY,

.iBUT
STILL
THE
LADY
SAID
401" *''

4 1

',WT

The season's
gayest romance
.from the grqot
Broadway laugh
hit!I

a,,,,
I4O11 "

i
I,

JOSE ITURBI, pianist
KIRSTEN FLAGSTAD,
BOSTON SYMPHONY
JOSEF HOFMANN, piar
BUDAPEST UNIVERSI
Y'EHUDI MENUHIN, v
GREGOR PIATIGORSK
ROTH STRING QUAR

A

NEXT CONCERT

CI

Folwedby
r 010 C4 7~I

limited number c

CI Gpresents
renee Tibbett
OCT. 27 8:30 P.M.
HILL AUDITORIUM
)f good seats still available.
LEVELAND ORCHESTRA November 7
Artur Rodzinski, conducting
. . November22
soprano . . November 30
ORCHESTRA December 7
nist. . January 10
TY CHORUS. Jariuary25
lolinist .February 15
eY, violoncellest * ,February 27
TET March9
of both season and individual

I

Reinhold Schuniel
IN PERSON

ON STAGE

' The Streamlined .Mistress
of Modern Melody"

RiTA
with her

RIO

ALL -GIRL N. B. C. ORCHESTRA
and RHYTHM REVUE

"Over the counter sale"

including

I

BETTY

,*. j-\ ~ j*-. I

I

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