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October 13, 1938 - Image 7

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1938-10-13

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Gridders
nCisle Nam es Ga r
Squad Of 36 1
To Make TripI
This w
Varsity Shows Improved. Ann A:
Offense And Defense In Speedbal
mural a
Final Practice fraternit
swung i
A confident band of Michigan grid- Field, ea
ders, 36 strong, depart for Minneapolis away wit
this afternoon, and for the first time troduced
Mitchell,
in several years the Wolverines are letics at'
given more than an outside chance by The ga
the experts to tame the Gopher and was thei
bring the Little Brown Jug back to I mother o
Ann Arbor. there ha
Those named for the trip by Coach tumn spo
Crisler are: quate en
Ends: John Nicholson, Danny included
Smick, Elmer Gedeon, Vince Valek,, and Har
Ed Frutig, Ernie Zielinski, and Ed at fullba
Czak.
Tackles: Capt. Fred Janke, Bill The lin
Smith, Joe Savilla, Don Siegel, Den- all week
nis Kuhn, and Forrest Jordan. answert
Guards: Ralph Heikkinen, John day, was
Brennan, Fred Olds, Ralph Fritz, and Smick a
Milo Sukup. Savilla
Centers: Archie Kodros, Horace Brennan
Tinker, and Reuben Kelto. center.'
Backs: Forest Evashevski, Jack After a
Meyer, Lou Levine, Tom Harmon, barks at
Wally Hook, Norm Purucker, Walter the Mic
Kitti, Paul Kromer, Fred Trosko, Ed spending
Phillips Howard Mehaffey, Ed Chris- squad wi
ty, Hercules Renda, Dave Strong and morrow
Derwood Laskey. practice
Frosh Scrimmage The even
Yesterday afternooi,, in a final Saturd
heavy workout, Crisler sent his ing for th
charges through a defensive drill Head Coa
with the Jayvees running through the Gop
Minnesota plays, and followed this his star3
with an offensive workout, Wally ence Mu
Weber's yearlings providing the op- 1930 and
position. On the defense, the Varsity field coa
made a much better showing than halfback
earlier in the week, the line-men driv- s
ing in continually to stop the re-
serves at scratch.
Despite the game struggle put on
by the freshman eleven, most of the
Wolverine plays were working with
flawless precision. The backfield
which was given preference in yes-
terday's srimmage, consisted of Eva-
shevski, recovered from a bruised
shoulder at quarterback, Purucker

De part

Today

ne Invented By I-M Director
Proves Popular Autumn Sport
By ARNOLD DANA There is baseball in the spring and
week is coronation week in basketball in the winter months, but
,rbor-coronation of King a fall sport in which every-ne, no
1 to the throne of Intra- matter how unskilled, can play, al-
ctivities. Approximately 40 ways was lacking. Football requires
y speedball teams have too great an expense in equipment
nto action at South Ferry to make it adaptable to Intramural
ach trying its best to come'athletics
th top honors in the sport in-
and developed by Elmer Soccer Discarded
director of Intramural Ath- Soccer also was discarded due to
Michigan. the fact that when played without
variations, it was too skilled a game

ame itself, originated in 1921,
result of necessity being the
f invention. For many years
d been a demand for an au-
ort which would afford ade-1
joyment to enable it to be
in Intramural athletics.
mon at halves, and Phillips,
ck.
Leave Today
ne which has remained intact'
and which will undoubtedly
the opening whistle Satur-
composed of Nicholson and
t ends, Captain Janke, and
at tackles, Heikkinen and
at guards, with Kodros at3
a light practice the team em-
t 5:22 this afternoon from
higan Central Station. After
the night in Chicago, the
ill head for Minneapolis to-
morning and hold a light1
in the Minnesota stadium.
ing will be spent in St. Paul.1
ay's game will be homecom-
hree of the Michigan coaches.
ach Crisler formerly directed
her grid forces and among1
pupils was line coach Clar-
ann, All-American guard inI
1931. Earl Martineau, back-1
ach, was an All-American
at Minnesota in 1923.

to be attempted by novices, and
when played with variations it was
so simple that ithnevergot beyond
the grammar school stage. WhatY
then, was there to attract the atten-
tion and interest of a great number
of boys?
The answer was found in speed-
ball, which had its first trial in the
fall of 1921. It met with immediate
success due to the fact that it com-
bined the footwork of football and
soccer, passwork of football and bas-
ketball, and general headwork.
Not Dangerous
There is no danger of serious bodily
injury due to the fact that there is
no running with the ball, thus elim-
inating the dangers of tackling. No
great cost is run up by the purchase HE PROOT
of uniforms and portective materials.
The rules are very simple as special .natural
attempts have been made to keep and to with
the game very clear. Scoring has been
made very easy thus keeping the in- color. Our
terest at a high point.
Speedball is now promoted as an
Intramural sport at many schools,
colleges, and universities throughout
the country, and has even spread in
Canada, Mexico, the Philippines, and
China. Before long, this game should
take its place alongside of football,
soccer, and basketball in intercolle-
giate athletics.

Out of the same battle, there rose
another mighty eleven destined to
ascend to the pinnacle of national'
football acclaim. That eleven was
Minnesota. Beginning in the follow-
ing Wisconsin game which the Goph-
ers won, 6-3, Bierman's "boys" clicked
off 21 consecutive triumphs before
the Northwestern Wildcat clawed
them into a 6-0 defeat in 1936. But
they were still national champions.
Last year the Gophers slipped, but
Minnesota football mediocrity was
still far away. They were still Big
Ten champs, even though losing by a
combined'6-point total to non-con-
ference foes. Meanwhile, the Wol-
verines started climbing back, won
four out of eight games.
And up to Saturday's game, the
Gophers have started on another
brilliant campaign, winning three
games with power reminiscent of
Gopher elevens of '34 and '35. But
the loss of Harold Van Every,
phenomenal junior passer, has
forced the Gophers to grind out
victories the hard way . . . by
power . . . without a dangerous
overhead threat to baffle the op-
position.
And up here in Minneapolis, where
October and November Saturdays
spell F-O-O-T-B-A-L-L, we hear of
the Michigan football revival spon-
sored by an old Minnesota hand ...
Herbert "Fritz" Crisler. There is new
spirit, new confidence, new hope
among the 1938 Wolverines. Behind
that there is a reborn veteran line,
the best set of backs in the confer-
ence.
To stop and think, as many Minne-
sota fans are doing, are Minnesota
and Michigan still the barometers of
the national football hurricane? May
Saturday's game be another turning
point in Big Ten football? May an-
other possible tie rocket Michigan
football fortune to the heights of
yesterday, and relegate Minnesota to
a secondary position? Well, will his-
tory repeat?
But anyone's a sucker to gaze any
farther ahead than yesterday into
the land of What's Coming. So we'll
just wait and see who gets "jugged"
in Memorial stadium Saturday.
Last Minute Field Goal
For B. C. Defeats Titans
BOSTON, Oct. 12.-(/P)-Fella Gin-
toff's last-minute 15-yard placement
field goal enabled Boston College to
come from behind and gaina hard-'
fought 9-6 victory over Detroit today
before 20,000 persons at Fenway Park.
Detroit scored in the first period
when Ed Palumbo raced the last 12
yards after completing a 38-yard pass
to Johnny Halpin. Boston College
marched 50 yards in the fourth quar-
ter before Pete Gignetti tied the score
with a 12-yard off-tackle smash.

Ingalls, Roberts, Meizow
Stand Out On Defense
The freshmen football squad final-
ly got a chance to show their stuff
yesterday when Varsity Coach Fritz
Crisler called them over to stop the
offensive thrusts of his Minnesota
bound first and second teams.
The courageous yearlings howled'
and fought their way to a brave
showing for the first half of their 30
minute drill, but age and experience
finally cooled them off, and the last
half found the wicked Wolverines
plowing huge holes in the tired frosh
line.
Outstanding in the yearling de-
fensive were the two Kiski boys, Bob
Ingalls, at center, and Harris Roberts,
at quarterback, with Bill Melzow, the
rugged all-state guard from Flint
Central, looking throughout the
scrimmage like a Heikkinen in the
making.

..

0

I I

Watch for

Q I

what a, manI
GIVE HIM CREDIT-THE FELLOW
WHO MAKES THAT LONG RUN...
BUT DON'T FORGET THE THOU-
SANDS OF OTHER FELLOWS WHO
KNOW THEIR 'STUFF" AND WEAR
Pi Gbs

$ 16350

and $2250

YOWA II' ,pOUR,
OVERICOATiS ARE WAR11l'

ut - M I k,

Ii

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