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June 03, 1939 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1939-06-03

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

4

A, JUNE 3, 1939

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

FAC FAINFV

_

Union Engages
Bill Sawyer's
12-Piece Band

To Lead Union Band

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6ngagement
DAZE . . by Davy

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To Succeed Bob Steinle;
Girl Vocalist Will Sing
As Part Of Orchestra
Bill Sawyer's orchestra will play
for the regular Friday and Saturday
night dances at the Unionnext year
-Stanley G. Waltz, general manager
of the Union, has announced.
The band is a twelve-piece organi-
zation and plans for next year in-
clude a girl vocalist, Sawyer said.
The orchestra played for the 1939
Freshman project and for the New-
man Club formal. They have filled
engagements at Johnson's Rustic
Tavern at Prudenville, Mich., for the
past two summers where they will
play again this year. The band has
made several broadcasts over WWJ
and has played for many house dances
on campus.
The new organization will replace
Bob Steinle's orchestra which has
played at the Union since 1934.
Shortly after the Union opened, Dr.
Earl V. McKinley, who went down
on the China Clipper last year, led
the Drchestra which played for the
weekly dancing. Since that time the
leaders have included Paul Wilson,
Charles Wolcott, Sid Bryant, and
Dpn Loomis who held the position
prior, to Steinle.
Fraternities Plan
closing Activities
Three fraternities are planning ac-
tivities for the last weeks of school.
Alpha Kappa Psi will have a stag
paty for their seniors on Saturday,
June 10. The program will last all
evening and faculty- guests have been
invited.
Alpha Lambda is planning an all-
day, picnic for its members on Sun-
day, June 11. The site has not been
chosen as yet.
-The June house party which is an
annual affair given by Phi Kappa
Psi has beenrtentatively set for June
14, 15 and 16.

I

Gigham Featured
For New Fashions
A complete gingham wardrobe is
one of the newest ideas of this sea-
son. Starting with the most informal
clothes, gingham shorts are being
shown. A common red and white
check makes a very distinctive play
suit.
But this does not even begin to
exhaust the supply of the material.
Date dresses are being shown which
continue to carry out the gingham
fashion. The skirt comes in ahcool
material of blue and white check.
The top of this two pieced costume
is of white organdy, shirt waist
style.

Results Announced In Tennis Tournament
In the semi-finals of the annual In the mixed doubles Samuel Rot-
tennis tournament Dorothy Maul, '39, berg, '42, and Charlotte Brown, Grad.,
was defeated by Margaret Cotton, '42, defeated Miss Cotton and Vahan Ka-
with the score 4-6, 6-1, 8-6. Miss Cot-
ton will play Betty Shaw, '41, Sunday lajan, '42.
ATTENTION STUDENTS
LET US HANDLE YOUR PERSONAL EFFECTS
FREE PICK-UP and DELIVERY
Service to all principal cities
Service to all foreign countries
For further information call
7102
Universal Corlooding & Distributing Co.

I

MAKE
MONEY
ON BOOKS
Bring your boks to
the Student Book Ex-
change for greater
gains.
Set Your Own Price
No Middleman Profit
Avoid Loss
Sponsored by
The Union, League
and Daily
Student
BOOK
Exchange
Opens June 7, 1-5 p.m.
South Lounge of Union
- -~

BILL SAWYER
Flower Show
Bfegins Today
At Field House
The Citizens' Flower Show will open
at 2 p.m. this afternoon at the Field
House for a three-day display of
specimen gardens and flower arrange-
ments.
The show will be held from 2 p.m.
to 10 a.m. Saturday, 10 a.m. to 10
p.m. Sunday, and 10 a.m. to noon
on Monday. Mrs. D. I. Loree, is gen-
eral chairman of the affair, and Mrs.
Frederick Coller is in charge of stag-
ing the flower show. The commit-
tee consists of town and faculty people
who are displaying flowers.
Over 15 specimen gardens have
been assembled for the exhibit under
the direction of Prof. George G. Ross,
of the University landscape depart-
ment, and with the assistance of
many students in his department. In-
direct lighting effects will be used to
illuminate the various displays.
A tea garden arranged under the
auspices of the Ann Arbor King's
Daughter's will be a center of at-
traction, where refreshments will be
served. A luncheon will be served
there this afternoon only, the pro-
ceeds of which will go to the Crippled
Children's Fund of the King's Daugh-
ters. The garden wll be decorated
with garden parasole and tables.
A large photographic exhibit of
prints made by various camera clubs
of the city and by school students
will also be included, in the show.
Prizes will be given for the best pho-
tographs submitted.
Cups will be awarded for the best
school flower exhibit, the outstand-
ing home garden specimen exhibit-
ed, the best bouquets submitted and
for the best six specimen blooms.
Zeta Phi Eta Ends
Year With Election
And Initiation Tea
Zeta Phi Eta, national professional
speech sorority, completed its activi-
ties" for the year with the pledging
and initiation of twelve new girls at
a tea, Sunday, May 21, and the elec-
tion of officers on Thursday, June 1.
The pledges are Barbara Zapp,
'40, and Ethel Swanson, Grad, while
those initiated were Elaine Alpert,
'41, Dorcas Corrin, Grad., Margaret
Fry, '39, Nancy Harris, Grad., Elaine
Kahl, '40, Ruth Laing, '40, Mary
Anne McCoy, Jane Anne Rather, '39,
Norma Vint, '40, and Beulah Fenske,
'39.
Next year's officers are: Betty
Jean Pence, '40, president; Elaine
Kohl, '40, vice-president; Elaine Ber-
gers, '40, recording secretary; Janet
Sibley, '40, corresponding secretary,
and Ruth Laing, '40, treasurer.

It seems as if our friend, Miss June Bride, has already received a super-L
abundance of lovely gifts for her future home but as yet there has been no c
strictly personal shower given her. ,.She wants to be well supplied with thef
many luxurious things that every young woman casts as envious eye towards
but which she never feels she can afford.
So let's open a host of enticing packages arranged on a table in the gardens
, of one of her friends. This has been a lovely shower on a perfect
'June day with tea on the cool, shaded terrace from which the
\\guests went out onto the lawn to sit on bright cushions while
June opened the many packages there.
Among all other things, she was most thrilling with a half
dozen sheer chiffon stockings in various tones one of her friends had given
her. In view of the fact that June is spending her honeymoon at a resort
in the mountains, she was more than pleased to get a set of pastel shaded
cotton ankle sox that would match any and all of her sports clothes.
Interested by its size, the next package June opened was a large one with
silvery white wrappings and a dainty white lace bow and ribbon around it.
And what a thrill sbe got. When she had taken out great folds of turquoise
and burgundy taffeta they disclosed themselves to be, first a perfectly
luscious turquoise night gown that might easily pass for a formal and sec-
ondly, a burgundy princess style house coat of the same material. They
both have the appealing feature of beirig washable which isn't to be sneezed
at in these times when practical is a universal byword.
One of the most luxurious presents June received was a white satin nightie
with a delicate flower print on the material. Another satin .
gown was of peach satin with a shirred chiffon panel across the
front which was edged by tiny French knoted rose-buds around
the panel and over the narrowstrap shoulders. A more tailored -
gown of dusty blue satin, which incidentally seems to exemplify
all that is sumptious, had tiny puffed sleeves, Peter Pan collar
and a high, fitted waist.f
There were several slips to be seen on the table when June
Bride had unwrapped all of her presents that day. Two of them
were tailored white satin with pastel monograms on them while
another one was a hand-made French silk slip with chantilly lace \
edging around the top.'
Do you remember the time when grandma looked through thatf
old trunk with all of her wedding clothes carefully laid away in r
blue tissue paper? Well, in that trunk there were several quaint
little camisole tops to be worn under her dimity dresses and petticoats or
half slips as we call them today. It just so happens that these very things
are in the height of style now and that they are among the most treasured of
June's gifts. Made of fine white muslin, they have fragile lace bindings
with little blue satin draw strings through them, even above the ruffle on
the bottom of the slip.
And then there were lots of other luxuries in the line of cosmetic prep-
arations that will stand June in good stead long after her
E honeymoon. A royal blue leather make-up travel kit took
a prominent position on the table. It had a lock clasp so
that the little velvet pockets on the inside might be used
for jewels. There were a complete line of jars and bottles
in the kit for all imaginable creams and lotions with a shallow tray above
them for make-up.
Bath oil of the most popular concentrated perfumes with a matching box
of powder and bottle of cologne just about completed the beautiful array
of gifts June received that day.

1I

I

THE
MOTH
IS NO MYT H
NEXT WEEK MAY BE TOO LATE?
This is a scare headline. Well-we want you
to be scared. You ought to be scared. There
are only two safe places for a fur coat-one
is on your back and the other is in a vault.
You know that you won't wear your fur coat
during the next few months. Therefore, don't
leave it hanging in a heated closet where
moths will lay eggs that will quickly hatch
into grabby little grubs.
Let Zwerdling's BE YOUR BODYGUARD this
summer against pestiferous moths. We'll
if you desire. At moderate cost.
35 Years of Dependability
PHONE 8507 215-217
ZWERDLING BUILDING EAST LIBERTY

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THE ANN ARBOR FEDERATION OF MUSICIANS,
Local No. 625, A. F. of M. and the following orchestras
wish to thank the many organizations and individuals
who, during the past season, have employed union
musicians, for their dancing parties and other en-
gagements.
BILL BOYD AND HIS ORCHESTRA
204 Nickels Arcade, Dial 5845
WM. MacKAY AND HIS ORCHESTRA
Law Club, Dial 4148-113
HAL CARTER AND HIS ORCHESTRA
507 Fifth Avenue, Dial 3937
BILL GAIL AND HIS ORCHESTRA
228 South Thayer, Dial 2-2992
READE PIERCE AND HIS ORCHESTRA
204 Nickels Arcade, Dial 5845
HERB RITZ AND HIS ORCHESTRA
618 Lawrence, Dial 2-2735
HERM SALAMONSON AND HIS ORCHESTRA
507 Fifth Avenue, Dial 3937
BILL SAWYER AND HIS ORCHESTRA
719 Arbor, Dial 2-1138
EARL STEVENS AND HIS ORCHESTRA
845 Brookwood, Dial 7813
CLARE SALTZ AND THE PEPPER SHAKERS
114 Ford, Ypsilanti, 461w
BOB STEINLE AND HIS ORCHESTRA

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