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May 25, 1939 - Image 2

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1939-05-25

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

THURSDAY, MAY 25, 1939
0 .

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I

Doing The 'Patty-Cake Prance'

Noted Educators To Be Present
At Geneva Student Conference

U. S. Ambassador

It's Not Baby Talk when adults begin on "Patty-cake," for that's the
name of a new dance being demonstrated by Mary "Punkin" Parker
and Joseph Rines, orchestra leader credited with having introduced
the "Laimbeth Walk."
University Woman Has Attained
High Position As Astronomer

office, the entrant is greeted by the
welcoming smile of a short, thin;
agreeable personage wearing a smock
coat. Although at one time she may
be reading from one of the numerous
astronomical books in the room, at
another she may be working on data
collected from her study of sun spots
or class "B" stars, and at still other
times she may be found correcting
bluebooks.
Dr. Losh conducts three classes,
225 students, in all for which she al-
ways marks all bluebooks. Besides
this, her research work takes her into
the study of the velocities and com-
position of "B" type stars. She is
now especially interested in the star
"Zeta tauri."
Like many instructors in her field,
she is interested hf student activi-
ties, enjoying teaching and is fond of
mathematics, which is closely allied
with her work. "I don't have any
definite hobby," she laughed, "but I
do read light novels in my spare
time." She likes to travel and has been
to many places in the United States,
but her duties have kept her from
traveling extensively.
Instructor In 1927
Dr. Losh received her B.A. from
Ohio Wesley'an, and her Master's in
'22 and Doctorate in '24 from Michi-
gan. After teaching in the astrono-
my department at Smith and working
at the Mt. Wilson Observatory at
Pasedena, Calif., she was made an in-
structor here in 1927 and assistant
professor in 1936.
About half an instructor's time
should be spent in classwork and the
other in research, she says, but at
times, especially about this time of
year, classes take the upperhand. As
secretary-treasurer of Phi Beta Kap-
pa and as chairman of the Michigan
Alumnae Scholarship committee, she
has incurred additional duties re -
cently.
In addition to these societies, Dr.
Losh belongs to Sigma Xi, the Ameri-
can Astronomical Society, the His-
tory of Science Society, Fellow of
Royal Astronomical Society of Eng-
land, Research Club, American As-
sociation of University Women and
American Association of University
Professors.

Gathering together its alumni ofc
the last 50 years, the Geneva Studentt
Conference will hold its annual con-
vocation June 11-18 at Lake Geneva,f
Wis.
Prof. Howard Y. McClusky, of the
school of Education, has been called
to head one of the several "commis-
sions" in which problems of vital cur-
rent interest will be discussed.
Judd To Speak
Dr. Walter H. Judd, medical mis-
sionary to China, who has recently
spoken on campus about Japan's in-
vasion will also be present at the Con-
ference.
The Geneva Conference attempts
to provide contact with men who are
shaping the course of events in con-
temporary America, and to get an "in-
sight and perspective on presonal and
vocational decisions, and to learn
how to live courageously, creatively
and triumphantly."
Its aims, also, to guide clearer
thinking on religious, social, econom-'
ic and international issues, and to
plan the building of a vital Christian
movement on the college campus.
Offers Outdoor Life
The Conference offers an excellent
period- of camp life including swim-
ming, fishing, sailing and out-of-
door living, together with educational
and cultural advantages. The daily
program includes "platform hours" in
which addresses will be- given on the
Christian philosophy of life as re-
lated to problems of personal and so-
University Bureau
Improves Relations
With State Board
By AUDREY FLESHAM
Promotion of unified cooperation
between the University of Michigan
and the State Department of Public
Instruction is the function of the
University Bureau of Cooperation
with Educational Institutions, formed
in 1932. Prof. George E. Carrothers of
the School of Education is the direc-
tor of the bureau
The work of the bureau is divided
between committees, headed by the
Committee on Cooperation with Edu-
cational Institutions. This body, the
policy-forming organization of the
bureau, has as its purpose the promo-
tion of cooperative activities and the
encouragement of friendly relations
between all schools and colleges of
-the University of Michigan and other
educational institutions. Under it
are the Committee on Relations with
Secondary Schools and the Commit-
tee on Relations with Institutions of
Higher Learning.
Visits are made, to various schools
in the State to determine their needs
and to help them by the Committee
on Secondary Schools. This group
accredits high schools throughout the
State.
The committee on higher learning
does not accredit collegiate institu-
tions; instead, it cooperates with
them in matters of mutual concern
and makes visits on request to see
the work accomplished, to plan co-
operative or combined courses, and
to develop a better understanding of
what each institution is doing.
Stutz Is Delegate
To ASU Institute
Harry Stutz, '39, was chosen as
delegate to the second Summer Ses-
sion of the Student Leadership Insti-
tute, Locust Farms, Poughquag. N.Y.,
at a meeting yesterday of an Ameri-
can Student Union executive commit-
tee. Alternates are Mary Cummins,
'42, and Miriam Wellington. '41.
Tentative plans for a three-day
local cooperative training school fol-
lowing examinations were made. All

ASU members are eligible to partici-
pate in the course which will train
students in organization technique.
MICHIGAN
In Mo4O-SGya-May.r's
DIE
C
Also
CARTOON - MUSICAL - NEWS
_____Coming Sunday
FRED ASTAIRE
GINGER ROGERS
in
"The Story of the Castles"

cial living, as well as special devo-
tional and worship periods. Forums
and informal hours of discussion will
folloyw the platform addresses.
In addition to Professor McClusky
and Dr. Judd, there will appear, Dean
Thomas W. Graham, of the Graduate
school of theology at Oberlin, Dean
Charles W. Gilkey, of the University
of Chicago, and Dr. Paul A. Schilpp,
of the philosophy department of
Northwestern University.
73iood Bank'.
I sProposed
For Hospital1
By ALBERT BLAUSTEIN
Work is now in progress to have a
"blood bank" installed at the Univer-
sity Hospital, acording to Dr. S. Mil-
ton Goldhamer, of the Simpson
Memorial Institute.
A "blood bank," Dr. Goldhamer
explained, is a storehouse for blood,
in which all varieties are kept ,to be
given to patients when they need
transfusions.
Sterile Technique
The blood is removed from the donor
under sterile technique, he said, and
is stored in a specially constructed
ice box which is kept at a tempera-
ture of from three to five degrees
centigrade. This extremely low tem-
perature is necessary to prevent red
blood cells from deteriorating before
seven to ten days have elapsed, as
they usually "hemolyze" within 24
to 48 hours at room temperature.
Sodium citrate is mixed with the
blood to prevent it from clotting.
There are many advantages which
may result from a "blood bank," Dr.
Goldhamer stated. The cost of trans-
fusions is reduced considerably; blood
of any type is available so that there
will be no delay in transfusions if an
emergency arises, and intravenous
therapy work may be centralized un-
der one department which permits
the opportunity to more closely super-
vise and study this type of treatment.
A Special Department
Because of the care and details in-
volved, a special hospital department
under the supervision of a doctor
and manned by four trained techni-
cians is necessary.
Dr. Goldhamer said reports ob-
tained from the many hospitals -em-
ploying this method of transfusion,
indicate that "blood banks" will soon
lose their sensationalism and be-
come routine.
4 " R[S[RVATIONS
Any Steamer or Advertisd
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A COMPLETED FREE * WERE
BERMUDA, CALIFORNIA, CHINA, ETC. BOOK NOW
Expert Advice. Licensed Since 1917. Reference-Any Local ank
KUEBLER TRAVEL BUREAU ANN AR602

Alexander W. Weddell (above)
has gone to Spain as U.S. Ambas-
sador. He had been ambassador to
Argentine since 1933, and succeeds
Claude Bowers.

Make Mine A Want

MATINEE TODAY at 3:15
EVENINGS at 8:30
HARRY IRVINE in
"AMERICArNLANDSCAPE"
By ELMER RICE
" ... a rather triumphant performance for, to the last bit-part,
the play is beautifully performed."
-- Detroit News
Prices: 75c - $1.10 - $1.50 Matinees Thurs. and Sat. at 3:15
1939 DRAMATIC SEASON
LYDIA MENDELSSOHN THEATRE Box Office Phone 6300

4.

Exhibit At Library
Describes Exploits
Of Chief Pontiac
An exhibition of books, maps and
newspapers concerned with the ex-
ploits of Pontiac, chief of .the Ottawa
Indians, is now on .display at the
Clements Library.
Maj. Henry Gladwin's correspon-
dence is an important feature of the
exhibit, which also includes 4n ex-
change of letters between Gladwin
and Pontiac.
Among the printed works displayed
is a poetic drama "Ponteach," by
Robert Rogers, one of the earliest
published dramas by a native Ameri-
can writer. Two copies of a dime
novel, which popularized Pontiac's
life are exhibited, along with the
book from which it was plagiarized,
Francis Parkman's "History of the
Conspiracy of Pontiac." A copy of
the "London Chronicle" of Feb. 2,
1764, features an article about Pon-
tiac's War almost a year after he
had offered to cease hostilities.

MOIL

°-- THE OA NGER'S
HOW CAN VOU EALL PAST NOW!
LOOK SO HAPPY? EVERYBODY S SO
WE MIGHT BE EATEN EXCITED OVER
AAY M/NUTE MLOW GREYHOUND
FARESNOME.
ca THEY'VE FORGOTTEN
9U5

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SHOWS CONTINUOUS
At 2:00-4:18-6:39-9:00 P.M.
Now!r
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thiiai

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I1

Aviation Meeting
Held Here June

UNIONII ii
A Parainpnt Picture starring
Barbara Stanwyck
and Joel McCrea with
Akita Tamiroff " Robert Preston

7

I

"Technical Conference on Airport
Construction" is the title of the
three-day meeting of government and
commercial aviation officials to be
held at the Union June 7, 8 and 9.
The conference has been arranged
by the College of Engineering, in co-
operation with state and national
aconautical associations. It will fea-
ture papers upon the functions of
government administrative agencies
in airport planning and construction,
soil preparation, grading and drain-
age, and discussion upon materials
used in runway paving.
The three formal sessions will be
presided by Dean Anderson of the
College of Engineering, A. B. Mc-
Mullen, chief of the airport section
of the Civil Aeronautics Authority,

Coming Saturday
Everyone who calls himself
on American should see-
"Con fesions of a
NaziSpy"

L

. #

F '

I

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