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May 13, 1939 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1939-05-13

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Y, MAY13, 1939

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

?ACJ7 ,M r

Baseball Team Loses; Track Squad, Gridders Compete

Today

Smick Pounded
As Nine Bows
To Indiana, 9-5
Barry To Face Hoosiers'
In Crucial Conference
Contest AtFerry Field
(Continued from Page 1)
portunist style, scoring in the first
without the benefit of a hit by taking
advantage of two errors and Mike
Sofiak's neat sacrifice. However, the
Wolverine prosperity was short lived
as Indiara hopped on Smick for
three in the third.
After successive singles by Jack
Corriden, Mike Kosnan, and Tom
Gwin filled the bases, Danny hit Hal
Cromer on the back to force in Cor-
riden, and his two mates scored as
srnie Andres forced Cromer at sec-
ond, Gwin sneaking in on the at-
tempt at a double killing.
Lisagor Scores Two
Michigan tied it up for the last
time in the fourth when a line singe
by Pete Lisagor scored Fred Trosko
who had walked, and Bill Steppon
who popped a double to left.
From this point on its was all
Indiana. The sixth saw Boz, Stoshitz
double score Bob Dro for Hoosier tally
number four, while. three more runs
crossed the plate in the seventh on
doubles by Kosman and Kromer, a
pass to Gwin and a single by Don
Danielson.
Michigan got one back in their
half of the seventh, but the Hoosiers
retaliated in the eighth with two,
sending Smick to the showers and
ending the dwindling Wolverine
hopes. A lone Wolverine run in the
ninth served to make it look better
n the box scores, if little else.
Sofiak In Outfield
The Wolverines put a makeshift
line-up in the field. Little Mike Sofiak
was in right field where his injured
shoulder was less likely to 'trouble
him, and Bill Steppon took his place
at short. Mike made a great catch
of Corriden's long drive in the fourth,
-but donated the Hoosiers several
extra bases because of his inability
to throw overhand.
* * *
For third sacker Ernie Andres and
outfielder Bob Dro, the victory had
a double meaning, for besides moving
their team up a notch in the Con-
ference standings, it helped avenge
the basketball upset the Woverines
heaped on Indiana, which knocked
the Hoosiers off the cage throne.
Indiana stopped at East Lansing on
the way up long enough to shut out
Michigan State 7-0 and unearth a
pitching find in Seward Wilshere,
brother of the former Hoosier great
and ex-major leaguer, "Whitey." It
was Wilshere's first chance in a
college ball game despite the fact
that he's a senior. He'llbe on deck
today in case Don Hundley who'll
start for Indiana, runs into trouble.

., - - r i

IN THIS CORNER
By MEL FINEBERG

.r.

..

Hoytmen Face
Ohio In Year's
Last Dual Meet
Mile Relay Teams Primed
For Race; Watson May
Not Enter Shot Put
(Continued from Page 1)

i

R

ookie Kramer Holds
Tigers To Two Hits

Yellow Faces
Blue In Annual
Football Game.

iI-

I E

Apologies Damon ...
We walk over to the grandstand
sit down in back of first base and
say, "hello."
"Hello," comes back quick as a
flash so we think the fellow appears
sociable. So we introduce ourselves.
It turns out the guy is the sbcial type
and it also turns out that he is a
scout for a club known as the Boston
Red Sox which also plays baseball of
sorts. So we tell him that we work
on the paper around here and im-
mediately he shuts up like the clam
they're always talking about.
"A newspaper guy," he says, in
a tone that appears to have more
than -a trace of a sneer in it. "I
was down South and one of these
newspaper guys finds out that I
an a scout and the next day
everybody looks at me as though
I was trying to steal one of their
wisdom teeth. At present, my pro-
fession is not what is known as
hiighly regarded around institu-
tions of higher learning."
At this point we recall a story in
a weekly magazine in which a Wes-
tern coach says that big league base-
ball is weaning the college stars away
from alna .mater. So we ask this
scout, whose naime we have discovered
by devious means to be Fred Hunter,
what he thinks of aforementioned
article.
$ut this Mr. Hunter is careful
about what he says to newspapermen
so he asks us what we think. But
we're not to be put off and we say
to him "We asked you first." Now
this puts fim on the defense and
so he says "I think this article is all
wet. All scouts do not take boys out
of school. It is the exception who
does. I, myself, always deal with the
school and the coach."
Being curious, we ask him who
he is going to sign up from Michi-
gan but this scout guy crawls
back into his shell. He says "there
aren't many possibilities here ex-
Oept with one or two or three
exceptions." But he will not tell
us who these exceptions are.
* * *
Mfore Str ategy .
We still want to know who he has
his eye on but seeing he is cagey we
figure we will try to catch him un-
awares later on. So we seem to be
satisfied and shift his attention to
another question. This question is
"how does Michigan and Big Ten
baseball compare with baseball in
other parts of the country."
"Well," he says, shifting his
seegar from left to right, "it's
pretty hard to get in Michigan
and it's harder to stay in." We
agreed openly at this point, but
he continues in spite of it. "And
maybe they don't take baseball as

serious in this league as they do
in the South and the East."
We are wondering how we can find
out who he's interested in but he
still looks wary so we say "Who is
going to win the American League
pennant?" The seegar goes back to
the left and his opinion goes with it.,
"Well," he begins again, "if someone
besides us (Boston) can beat the
Yanks then we'll win. But we can
not win unless someone does beat1
them besides us." This sounds repe-
titious to us but we say nothing.
Well, one thing leads to an-
other and soon it comes out that
this baseball scout hasn't seen
the Red Sox play since the
southern spring trip and that the
reason he became a scout was
that he couldn't hit. He claims
that he played one year in the
majors, four years in the Texas
League, and reels off a whole
string of years adding up to 17
and then concludes by saying
that he played four years in the
Eastern League. Now this makes
us slightly suspicious because the
Eastern League was the name
given to the National League
before thy actually begin to
call it the National League which
time was a good while ago.
This Mr. Hunter claims that the
only two questions he exempts are:
1. how old are you and 2. how much
do they pay you. We see our chance
here and almost shout in glee "well,
who are you looking at here?" But
he outfoxes us again and replies
"I'm looking at them all."
We retreated in shame but figure
we will do more snooping on the mor-
row when this Mr. Hunter will re-
turn to the ball orchard, as the re-
porters call it.
Netters Down
Spartans, 6-3
Tohi, Kidwell, Percival,
Durst Win In , Singles
By ARNOLD DANA
Capturing four singles matches and
two doubles matches, the Wolverine
netmen overpowered the Michigan
State Spartans, 6-3, yesterday after-
noon at Palmer Field. The win was
the third in succession for the Weir-
men, and the ninth of the year.
Taking a 4-0 lead by sweeping the
first four singles matches in straight
sets, the Weirmen coasted through
the doubles. Jim Tobin, Capt. Don
Percival, John Kidwell, and Sam
Durst were triumphant over their
Michigan State foes. Kidwell made
a brilliant comeback in his second set

1
1

and Sherm Olmsted, who finished int
that order behind Gedeon last week,
should repeat that performance.
In the lows, Kelley and sophomore
teammate Jeff Hall, who ran a deadl
heat last week, will try to outdo each
other, with Tom Harmon fighting it
out with Buckeye Brandt for third;
place.j
Indoor Champion Jim Whittaker
may finally be the man to push Ram-
bling Ralph Schwarzkopf to break-
ing Don Lash's two year old Ferry
Field two-mile record of 9:18.7. At
the same time, Schwarzkopf will at-
tempt to break the jinx that has seen
him defeated in every Ohio dual
meet. Brad Heyl should take third
for Michigan.
The dashes will provide plenty of
opportunity for Buckeye partisans to
cheer as Co-Capt. Bob Lewis heads
the pack. Lewis is outdoor 220 champ
and last week ran 9.8 for the 100 andl
21.1 for the 220. Al Smith, who was
second in the 60 yard dash indoors,
will fight it out with the Buck ace,t
with Carl Culver and Norm Purucker
battling for third in both events.
by winning six games in quick order'
after being behind 5-1.
For the Spartans, in the singles,
Charles Gibbs and Irv Rawitz de-
feated Jim Porter and Ed Morris.
Rawitz, a former Michigan student,[
had to go three sets before van-
quishing Morris.
In the doubles play, the usual
steady team of Jim Tobin and John
Kidwell played very erratic tennis
and went down in defeat to Fred
Perkins and Chet Olson, 6-4, 6-2.
However, their defeat was moreI
than made up for by the other teams.
Sam Durst and Steve Woolsey had
little trouble in whitewashing their;
opponents in the first set, 6-0, but
when the Spartans changed courts,,
with Gibbs moving to the left court;
and Kositchek to the right, they were
forced to go 16 games before tri-
umphing, 9-7.
SUMMARIE S
Singles: Tobin (M) defeated Struck
(MSC) 6-3, 6-2; Percival (M) de-
feated Perkins (MSC) 6-4, 6-2. Kid-
well (M) defeated Olson (MSC) 6-4,
7-5. Durst (M) defeated Kositchek
(MSC) 6-3, 6-1. Gibbs (MSC) de-
feated Porter (M) 6-1, 6-4. Rawitz
(MSC) defeated Morris (M) 6-2, 3-6,
6-1.
Doubles: Percival, Morris (M) de-
feated Struck, Pratt (MSC) 6-4, 1-6,
6-3. Perkins, Olson (MSC) defeated
Tobin, Kidwell (M) 6-4, 6-2. Durst,
Woolsey (M) defeated Kositchek,
Gibbs (MSC), 6-0, 9-7.

ST. LOUIS, May 12.-(As)-In one
of the best pitched games of the still
young season, rookie Jack Kramer
held the Detroit Tigers to two singles
today and topped his performance by
driving in the only run to give the
St. Louis Browns a 1 to 0 victory.
Kramer, a right-hander, retired the'
first three men, walked Hank Green-
berg to start the second inning, and
then retired 15 straight batters be-
fore Chet Laabs singled to start the
seventh inning.
The Browns scored in the fifth after
Harland Clift walked and went to
second on Joe Glenn's single. Johnny
Berardino struck out and Don Heff-
ner fouled out, but Kramer came
through with a single to left, scoring
Clift with the winning run.
Golfers Seek
inth Victory

i

Indiana--9
Corriden, rf.,
Kosman, ss,
Gwin, cf ..

.42
.42

Caught Off Stride

I

IVI

arsity
Champ

Meets Big Ten
s At Evanston

H
2

0
0
1
2

Intra-Squad Contest Ends
Spring Training; Fritz,
Kodros Captain Teams
The annual Yellow-Blue gridiron
classic will close the 'current spring
football training period when two
evenly matched squads tangle in the
stadium at 4 p.m. today. There will
be no admission charge.
After being cut down to 30 minutes
of play last spring, the game has
again been restored to the regulation
60 minutes. Both squads were divid-
ed with the idea of keeping them
equal in strength, and there is a pro-
portional balance between yearlings
and veterans on each team.
However, the Blues don't seem to
think that the Yellows are their
equals for on the Field House bulle-
tin board they have scrawled the
final score for today's tilt-Blue 45,
Yellow 0. The last few days of prac-
tice have seen the Blues go through
their paces in a happy-go-lucky and
noisy manner, while the Yellows have
been more serious and determined,
but confident.
At 10 a.m. the squad will give a
demonstration of various phases of
the game before a gathering of ap-
proximately 2,000 high school coaches
and players representing 96 schools{
in the state. They will also be Athef
guests of the athletic department at
the afternoon tilt.
In addition to serving as a test of
the football team's ability as a whole,
the game will also permit the coaches
to see the individual candidates for
the Chicago Alumni Trophy under
fire. Today's performances will
merely be used to see if the boys' play
compares favorably with the pro-
gress they made during the spring.
It is not likely that the showings made
in the scrimmage will be the deciding
factors in the choice of the trophy
winner, who will be announced Fri-
day, May 19, but they will have some
bearing.

A
U"
2
0

Cromer, lb ...........4
Andres, 3b.... .....5
Danielson, 2b ........5
Dro, If ...............5
Stoshitz, c ...........4
Gentil, p .............4
Totals ...........40
Michigan-5 AB
Pink, cf .............5
Sofiak, rf ............3
Peckinpaugh, 3b ......5
Gedeon, lb ..........3
Trosko, if ...........3
Steppon, ss ..........4
Lisagor, 2b ...........4
Beebe, c .... . .... ..4
Smick, p ............3
Bond, p.............0
*Evashevski ..........1

R:
2
0
0
0
1
1
0
0
0
0
1

H
1
1
2
0
0
1
1
2
0
0
1

Boasting one of the best balancedE
lineups to represent Michigan in many
years, the Wolverine golf team meets
Northwestern University's Big Ten
Champions today at Evanston in an
attempt to ring up their ninth win
of the season.
Coach Courtright took along only,
five men, with Tom Tussing in the
fifth spot for the first time since he
injured his hand early in the season.
The first four men will be, as usual,
Jack Emery, Jim Loar, Capt. Bob
Palmer and Lynn Riess.
Capt. Sid Richardson, Conference
Individual "champ for the past two
years, heads the Wildcat team. Rich-
ardson, however, despite his record,
has lost to Babbish of Detroit and
Thompson of Iowa this year.
Senior Art Bedrosian, returning af-
ter a year's absence, plays number
two, and will probably team with
Richardson for the best ball match
against Emery and Loar.
Chester Bland, Frank Perpich and
Charles will occupy the three, four
and five spots; respectively.
Of the five men who will play
against the Wolverines, all except
Fannon are Evans scholars, attend-
ing the University on golf scholar-'
ships given by Dick Evans, famed
amateur golfer, and a Northwestern
alumnus.

1 1 10 0
0 0 1 3
0 1 3 3
1 2 3 0
0 1 7 2
1 2 0 3
9 13 27 13

O
0
3
2
11
2
0
2
7
0
0
0

A
0
0
3
0
0
2
1
0
2
0
0

Totals ..........35 5 9 27 8
*Batted for Bond in 9th.
Indiana...........003 001 320-9
Michigan .........100 200 101-5
Errors: Danielson 2, Cromer, Kos-
man. Two base hits: Kosman, Cro-
mer, Stoshitz, Steppon. Three base
hit: Corriden. Stolen bases: Kosman
2, Corriden, Sofiak, Peckinpaugh, Lis-
agor, Evashevski. Sacrifices: Sofiak,
Gedeon. Double plays: Andres to
Cromer; Danielson to Kosman. Left
on bases: Indiana 7; Michigan 6.
Bases on balls: off Gentil 2, off
Smick 1, off Bond 1. Struck out: by
Gentil 6, by Smick-6. Hits: off Smick
13 in 7 /13 innings, off Bond ,0 ii
1 2/3 innings. Hit by pitchers: by
Smick (Cromer). Losing pitcher:
Smick. Umpires: Jones and Walsh.
MAJOR LEAGUE SCORES
American League
Chicago 4, Cleveland 3
National League
Boston 7, Brooklyn 2
Philadelphia 10, New York 6
St. Louis 8, Cincinnati 7
TYPEWRITERS
ALL MAKES. Office
and Portable models,
bought, sold, rented,
exchanged, cleaned
and repaired.
FOUNTAIN PENS, STATIONERY
siT'UDLNT anid Offl'ICL SUPPLIES
0. D. MORRILL
314 South State Street
Since 1908 Phone 6615

EBlues,
Rogers
Bill Smith
Fritz (Capt.)
Ingalls
Laine
Ostroot
Crak
Megregian
Kromer
Dave Nelson
Christy

LINEUP
Pos. Yellows
LE Frutig
LT Kelto
LG Melzo
C Kodros (Capt.)
RG Butler
RT Wistert
ICE Fraumaun
Q Kohl
LH Strong
RH Call,
FB Westfall

WE

- -- - ___ _ _ -" II

_

1 ;
..:
'' ""'y

TONIGHT

J : v
rr

VAR

NIGHT

At the UNION
Members of the Baseball Squad as Gueq
at the Regular Saturday Evening Dance.
$1.00 per Couple
BOB STEINLE and His Orchestra

e
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... OF BEINGBORN
IN BROOKLYNN.y.
DURING 1888-HE
HAD 1 STO A-t
4
S PERSHING SPOKE TOHIM
,r~
BO6K r MOOi~i
REVIWER
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TIRICALT
ONE OF
UMN
) WILL
--?8
=HROUGHA SERIES OF
Is~e EDIORIAL JOBS HIS NAJURAL,
INDOLENCE IN REVIEWING BOOKS'
-TURNED HIM INTO A COLUMNiST!

sts

a

H EYWOOD
. DARING, HUMOROUS, SA
HE IS CHARACTERIZED AS'
AMERICA'S MOST INTERES
WRITERS... IN HIS COL
%IT SEEMS TO ME", YOL
FIND A VARIETY AND
FRESHNESS OF STYLE
UNUSUAL IN A .COLUMNI'

AMUSING, PENETRATING, CRITICAL COLUMNS by
I u W""/I/vj"\f"\ri" % "n" /'"\I I Et

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Hill

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