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May 11, 1939 - Image 6

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1939-05-11

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PAGE SIX

THE MICHIGAN -DAILY

THURSDAY, MAY 11, 1939

U T~l MTCIGANBA-T

THURSDAY., ...... M .AY i. 1929v

f

Eleventh Annual
Alumni Parley
Begins May 19

Singer Enjoys
Music;Hodges
dikes_-Tulips
(Continued from Page 1)

Remaiuung Programs For May Festival

Business Administration's
Conference Will Feature
Roundtable Discussions

Roundtable discussions on current
business conditions will feature the
School of Business Administration's
eleventh annual Alumni conference
Ntay 19 and 20 in the Rackham Build-
ing.
Subjects already selected for dis-
cussion are: "The Responsibility of
the Accountant to Management and
to'the Public," "How Market Research
Aids the Salesman," "Finding Capital
for Businesses and Business for Capi-
tal," "The Monopoly Problem and
the Monopoly Committee" and "The
Responsibility of Management to
the Stockholders."
Speakers at the opening session
May 19 in the Rackham Amphithe-
atre will be Eric L. Kohler, '14, and
George D. Bailey, resident partner of
Ernst and Ernst, Detroit. Mr. Kohler,
formerly Professor of Accounting at
Northwestern University, and now
comptroller of the Tennessee Valley
Authority, will speak on "The Rela-
tion of Management and Govern-
ment." The talk by Mr. Bailey, who
was one of the 12 witnesses called by
the SEC on the McKesson-Robbins'
scandal, will deal with the account-
ant's responsibility to management
and to the public. Discussion follow-'
ing the speeches will be led by Prof.
William A. Paton of the economics
department and by Robert L. Dixon,
'31BAd, who is now a member of the
University of Chicago faculty.
At the banquet on Friday, May 19,
seven students in the School of Busi-
ness Administration will be awarded
Beta Gamma Sigma Scholarship keys I
by Prof. Richard U. Ratcliff,. '34BAd.,
assistant director of the Bureau of
Business Research. those to be hon-j
ared are : Sanders A; Goodstein, ~'39,
Frederick R. Jones, '39, Elizabeth H.'
Christen, '40, David G. Hertzberg,

huge benefit show for the Musicians'
Fund."
Miss Swarthout thinks this is one
of the most beautiful college cam-
puses she has seen and especially
likes Dr. Ruthven's home and the
Clements Library. Here again Mr.
Hodges got that tulip-look. Universi-
ty audiences have been wildest in
their acclaim for her singing, Utah
and Washington particularly. Mr.
Hodges also noted rather proudly
that upon her r:iurn from Havana
she is to give a recital at West Point.
Among her most noted accomplish-
ments, he pointed out, were appear-
ing on the occasion of the 150th an-
niversary of Congress early this year
with John Charles Thomas provid-
ing the only singing ever heard with-
in Congressional walls (that is, pro-
fessional singing). She is also proud
of the fact that she supplanted the
graduation address at George Wash-
ington University commencement ex-
ercises and prepared the boys for
the outside world with a song instead
of a speech.
Hodges-podge: Her favorite opera
is the contralto part of "Norma"-
Adalgisa . . . she has been with the
Metropolitan for nine seasons . . .
very fond of early English compos-
ers, especially Morley and Purcell
S. ..she is one of the most consider-
ate, steady, sane and calm artists he
has ever appeared with . . . has made
five motion pictures, the last one
being "Ambush" with Lloyd Nolan
and Ernest Truex, in which Miss
Swarthout says she didn't sing a note
but screamed her head off . . . Ann
Arbor tulips are the loveliest he has
ever seen .
'40, " and William D. Knight, '40. The
main address on "America and the
European Crisis" will be given by
William A. Frayer,. formerly profes-
sor in the history department.

THURSDAY EVENING, MAY 11, at 8:30
Soloists
SELMA AMANSKY, Soprano
JAN PEERCE, Tenor
RUDOLF SERKIN, Pianist
THE UNIVERSITY CHORAL UNION
THE PHILADELPHIA ORCHESTRA
EUGENE ORMANDY and EARL V. MOORE,
Conductors
PALMER CHRISTIAN, Organist
Onward, Yee Peoples ................... Sibelius
Choral Symphony.................McDonald
SELMA AMANSKY
UNIVERSITY CHORAL UNION
Conducted by the Composer
Concerto No. 5 in E flat for Piano
and Orchestra .................... Beethoven
RUDOLF SERKIN
FRIDAY AFTERNOON, MAY 12, at 2:30
Soloist
- EZIO PINZA, Bass
THE YOUNG PEOPLE'S FESTIVAL CHORUS
EUGENE ORMANDY and JUVA HIGBEE,
Conductors
Andante for Strings, Harp and Organ .. Geminiani
Fantasy No. 1 in D major for Five Strings
(Transcribed for large orchestra) .......Jenkins
Arias from "The Marriage of Figaro"...... Mozart
Aria from "The Magic Flute" ............. Mozart
EZIO PINZA
Group of Songs:
The Nut Tree .. ...................Schumann
Cradle Song, Serenade in D Minor, Hedge
Roses, Wohin ...................Schubert
YOUNG PEOPLE'S FESTIVAL CHORUS
Aria from "La Juive" .................. Halevy
Aria from "Simon Boccanegra" ............ Verdi
MR. PINZA !
Symphony No. 5 in C minor............Beethoven
FRIDAY EVENING, MAY 12, at 8:30
Soloist
MARIAN ANDERSON, Contralto
MEN'S CHORUS OF THE UNIVERSITY
CHORAL UlION
THE PHILADELPHIA ORCHESTRA
EUGENE ORMANDY, Conductor

Compositions by Johannes Brahms
Academic Festival Overture
Rhapsodie for Alto, Men's Chorus, and Orchestra,
Op. 53.
MARIAN ANDERSON
MEN'S CHORUS OF THE CHORAL UNION
Songs with Orchestra.
a) Dein blaues Auge
b) Immer leiser wird mein Schlummer
c) Der Schmied
d) Von ewiger Liebe
MISS ANDERSON
Symphony No. 1 in C minor
SATURDAY AFTERNOON, MAY 13, at 2:30
Soloist
GEORGES ENESCO, Violinist
THE PHILADELPHIA ORCHESTRA
SAUL CASTON and GEORGES ENESCO,
Guest Conductors
PROGRAM
Overture to "Egmont" ................. Beethoven
Concerto in D major, Op. 61, for Violin
and Orchestra .................... Beethoven
GEORGES ENESCO
INTERMISSION
First Symphony -
Rumanian Rhapsody, No. 1 ..............Enesco
CONDUCTED BY THE COMPOSER
SATURDAY EVENING, MAY 13, at 8:30
Soloists
HELEN JEPSON, Soprano
RICHARD BONELLI, Baritone
ELIZABETH WYSOR, Contralto
GIUSEPPE CAVADORE, Tenor
GIOVANNI MARTINELLI, Tenor
NORMAN CORDON, Baritone
ARTHUR HACKETT, Tenor
THE PHILADELPHIA ORCHESTRA
THE UNIVERSITY CHORAL UNION
EARL V. MOORE, Conductor
PROGRAM
"OTELLO" (In Concert Form)..... .:.....Verdi
An Opera in Four Acts
.For Soli, Chorus, and Orchestra
Otello..............GIOVANNI MARTINELLI
Iago ....................... RICHARD BONELLI
Cassio................. GIUSEPPE CAVADORE
Montano, Lodovico, and the Herald .........
..... . . . .........NORMAN CORDON
Desdemona ..................... HELEN JEPSON
Emilia.. .. ..... .... ELIZABETH WYSOR
Roderigo.....................Arthur Hackett

Raskin Awarded
Prize For Speech,
'The Pre-Med ic'
Herbert A. Raskin, '40, received
first place in the second intra-depart-
mental speech contest of the semes-
ter held at 4 p.m. yesterday in Na-
tural Science Auditorium for his
speech entitled "The Pre-Medic." Leo
Kayser, '39, and Mary Mustard, '41,
were awarded second and third places
respectively.
Raskin called attention to the sur-
plus of pre-medics who receive good
marks but are unable to gain admit-
tance to the medical school because
of the lack of facilities. He urged
that some plan be adopted to weed
out these students before they spend
four years preparation for the school.
Speaking of "What Shall Be Done
About Swing Music," Kayser suggest-
ed that concert and dance halls be
set up where swing music shall be
prohibited, as well as certain hours
on the radio. Sections of dance floors
should be roped off where jitterbugs
can have full swing, and all acces-
sories used in such dancing should be
registered, he added. Miss Mustard,
choosing "A Rehabilitation Program"
as her topic, told of Mr. Mustard's at-
tempts to rehabilitate her.
Other participants in the contest
were: George S. Banta, '41, who spoke
on "Why I Would Go To War"; Har-
old Peterson, '40, who talked on "The
Greatest Thing In the World"; and
Wallace G. Wheeler, '39E, whose
topic was "An Easy Way To Better
Golf."
Arthur Secord of the speech de- 1
partment introduced the speakers.
Judges of the contest were: Prof.
Henry Moser, Norman Reid and Mark
Bailey, all of the speech department.
Tibbitts To Address Group
Of High School Principals
Dr. Clark Tibbitts, director of
the Institute of Human Adjustment
at the University will deliver a talk*
on the "Proposed Survey of Michi-
gan's Youth" before the regular spring
meeting of the Southeastern Michi-
gan High School Principals at a 12:00
noon luncheon Friday at the League.
After the program the group plans
a tour of the Rackham Building.

'Sable Cicada'
Earns Profits
More Than $600 Realized
By Chinese Students
Initiated as a drive for funds for
medical supplies to be sent to China,
the Chinese Students Club's cam-
paign has grown into a drive to raise
the necessary amount to purchase an
ambulance for their patriots.
This development came about after
the announcement of an unexpected-
ly great profit from the Chinese mov-
ing picture, "Sable Cicada," shown
here last Friday and Saturday. $600
was realized from the three perfor-
mances, in adidtion to which $40 has
been added in private contributijns.
The Club is now seeking $170 nec-
essary to reach the cost of an ambu-
lance. Contributions should be sent
to the International Center or to the
office of the SRA, which is aiding the
Chinese students in their campaign.

ill

Nting is more essentia
to a beautiful home, frater-
nity, or sorority than clean,
neat-looking rugs and carpets.
We offer you a service where-
by you can realize this objec-
tive and at the same time be
sure of safe, sure work which
is necessary in prolonging the
life of your rugs and carpets.
-- PROMPT SERVICE --
The
American Rug
Cleaning Co.
1032 Greene Street
Phone 8115

Classified Directory

I

Domenic Dascola Raps State's
Efforts To Elevate' Barbering

Classified Rates
The ;elasslfled columns close at five
o'ciockprevious °t6 day, of insertion.
x fox numbers may -be secured at no;
exlira charge.
:Cash in advance Uco. per reading line
for one or two ineertions. 1c per read-
ing line for three or more insertions.
(on basis of five average words to line).
Minimum three lines per insertion.
Telephone rate-15c per reading line
for to or more insertions.' Minimum
three lines per insertion.
10% dIscount if paid within ten days
from the date of last insertion.
Phone 23.24-1
FOR RENT
FOR RENT-Four bed room cottage
on Lake Leelanau just being com-
pleted. Entirely modern. Available
for entire season. Reply Post Office
Box 1, Ann Arbor. 639
WANTED)
WANTED-Any Old Clothing. Pay $5
to $500. Suits, overcoats, mink, e
sian lambs, diamonds, watches,
rifles, typewriters and old gold.
Phone and we will call. Cadillac
9458. Ann Arbor 6304. 388
WANTED-Summer jobs for men.
Apply Room 304 Union, Tuesday,
May 9th. 9:00 a.m. to 9:00 p.m.
Also Wednesday, May 10th, 9:00
a.m. to 12:00. J. E. Knox. 638
WANTED-2, 3 or 4 tickets for Mari-
an Anderson Concert. Seats in
pairs. Call 2-4559. Handicraft Fur-
niture Co. 640
WANTED - Furnished house for
eight weeks summer school. Reasw.
onable ,rent desired. No children.
Can furnish Ann Arbor references.
Write Mrs. John Elwell, 914 S.
Washington, Saginaw, Mich. 648
WANTED-One passenger to drive
to San Francisco, June 1. Dr.
Arnold, 2-2521. 644
WANTED-Experienced shoemaker.
Inquire at once to R. & S. Shoe
Store, 108 S. Main Street. 623

LAUNDRIES
LAUNDRY - 2-1044. Sox darned.
Careful work at low prices. 9
A TRIAL WILL PROVE-Shirts 14c.
Ace Laundry,' 1114 S. University.
643
WANT1'D - TYPING
TYPING-Reasonable and accurate.
719 Tappan. Call 3025.
TYPING-Experienced. Miss Allen,
408 S. 5th Avenue. Phone 2-2935
or 2-1416. 79
LOST
iLOST-Green Sheaffer fountain pen
with initials MLL. Reward. Call
4054 evenings.
FOR SALE
FOR SALE-$125 Reflex Korrell
sport camera, 2%x2% for $75.
Movie camera 8 and projector $60.
Call Ross 4121 ext. 518. 646
MISCELLANEOUS
WASHED SAND and Gravel, Drive-
way gravel, washed pebbles. Killins
Gravel Company. Phone 7112. 17
CASH PAID for your discarded
clothing. Claude Brown, 512 S.
Main. 311
HOME DECORATORS-Decorating,
painting. Budget plan if desired.
Dial 7209. 181
t re s 7
old byyourdealer. Itnot.send
ton, 1211 Walnut Street,
1 wAtNtlA P hiladelphia P., ept. U

New Ann Arbor Barber,
Graduate Of Michigan,
Scorns New Measures
If anyone sees Domenic Dascola,
Grad., proprietor of the Esquire bar-
ber shop, today, he'll be glad to tell
you just how terrible he feels.
Dascola's personal terrordthese
days is the bill now being debated
in the House of Representatives at
Lansing which would strip barber
shops of all exterior signs and ad-
vertisements. Even the time-honored
striped pole, emblem of the shearing
and shaving art, would be banished
under the measure.
Dascola, who majored in political
science in the University, scoffed at
a legislator's suggestion that the bill
would "dignify" the barbering pro-
fession. "It's ridiculous to suppose
that prestige can be brought to bar-
bering by denying it the privileges
enjoyed by doctors, dentists and other
professional men," the local tonsorial
specialist stated.
"Instead of such superficial meas-
ures, 'what's really needed to elevate
the profession are higher educational

requirements," Dascola said. "School
qualifications. should be raised from
the eighth grade to high school at
least."
If there must be government regu-
lation, Dascola, whose family has
been in barbering for almost 150
years, favors laws against cut-throat
competition and more rigid enforce-
ment of existing anti-premium regu-
lations. "These," he said, "would go
much further toward dignifying
Michigan barbers than the proposed
measure."
Dascola is collaborating now with
Prof. George Benson of the jolitical
science department on a bill to cor-
rect existing evils in barber shops.
Senior Engineers To Hold
Softball Contest At Picnic
A softball tournament will provide
the 'principal amusement at the sen-
ior engineers' picnic Saturday, May
13, chairman Dor Van Loon an-
nounced yesterday. Those going on
the outing will start from the En-
gineering Arch at 1:30 p.m. to spendl
the day in the Arboretum.

Forsythe Reports
Freshman Ailings
University freshmen are more un-
dernourished, have more acne, more
ring worm infection of the feet and a
few more colds and hospital admis-
sions than students of other classes,
Warren E. Forsythe, director of the
Health Service announced in 'his
monthly report.
The number of students treated for
colds during April exceeded by more
than 60 per cent the number who
were treated during the same period
last year. A total of 621 went to the
service. While cases of pneumonia
and acute appendicitis suffered slight
increases, the nose and throat opera-
tions at the Health Service decreased
from 47 during April, 1938 to 27 last
month.
Credner Will Speak Here
Tuesday On Geography
Dr. William Credner, professor of
geography in the Technische Hoch-
schule, Munich, and Carl Schurz,
professor of geography at the Univer-
sity of Wisconsin, will give a Univer-
sity lecture at 4:15 p.m. Tuesday, May
16, in the Rackham amphitheatre.

Caps, Gowns & Hoods,
For FACULTY and GRADUATES
Complete Rental and Sales Service
Call and inspect the nation-
ally, advertised line of The
C. E. Ward Company, New
London, Ohio.
All rental items thoroughly
sterilized before each time
used, complete satisfaction
guaranteed. Get our Rental
Rates and Selling Prices
VAN BOVEN, Inc.
Phone 8911 Nickels Arcade

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S. .Offers . . .

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