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April 28, 1939 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1939-04-28

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FI.DAY, APRIL28, 1939

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

C

Barry

To Hurl Home Opener Against Michigan State Toda)

Spartans Rely
On Derrickson
For Slab Duty
Smick Selected To Face
Notre Dame Tomorrow;
Lineup Remains Intact'
(Continued from Page 1)
slump that has affected his entire1
team in recent games, announced
that there would be no changes in
the line-up, and was hopeful that the
boys would snap back into form to-I
day. Since returning froNi the South
the only members of the team who
have been hitting at their usual, clip
are Pete Lisagor, regular second base-
man and his alternate, Steppon.
Today's battle will bring back mem-
ories of last fall's football game, with
State's Allen Diebold, Gene Ciolek,
Casey Klewicki, Sam Nuznov, and
Derrickson seekin to revenge Michi-
gan's 14-0 grid 'victory. Wolverine
gridders who will be pitted against
them are Smick, Elmer Gedeon, and
Fred Trosko along with Forest Eva-
shevski, Milo Sukup, and Horace
Tinker of the reserve nine.

Soph Pitcher Picks Michigan
Over Star Studded Ball School.

By HERB LEV
If some bright individual had ever
devised a method whereby a catcher
could play conveniently with glasses
on, Michigan's baseball team today
would probably have been without its
best sophomore pitcher.
Lyle Bond, whose !excellent show-
ings in early games have earned him
the number three spot on the Wol-
Sophomore Mound Starj

Michigan
Pink, of
Sofiak, 3b
Peckinpaugh,
Gedeon, lb
Trosko, If
Smick, rf
Lisagor, 2b
Beebe, c
Barry, p

LINEUP
Michigan State
Diebold, rf
Duncan or Ciolek, ss
ss Klewicki, 3b
Dahlstrom, If
Nuznov, 1b
Owen, 2b
Keller, of
Cook, e
Derrickson, p

-Daily Photo by Zeitlin
LYLE BOND ...
sophomore mound star.

i

verine mound staff, started out as a
catcher in Clare High School, but
finding his specs too great a handi-
cap behind the plate, asked his coach
to give him a trial in the box.
Taught By Dean, Rowe
To make up the lost time Lyle en-
rolled in Ray Doan's Baseball School
in Hot Springs, Ark., in the summer
of 1935 to learn about pitching from
such noteworthies as Dizzy Dean,
Schoolboy Rowe, a n d Burleigh
Grimes. He came home a rather disil-
lusioned young man.
"I had a swell time," says Lyle,
"and I made some contacts which
might help me some day, but as far
as pitching-Bosh! I believe I learned
more here during the first two weeks
of practice than I did, during the
whole Hot Springs course. There

were over 300 students in school at
the time, and a large percentage of
them pitchers, so we couldn't very
well expect much individual atten-
tion.
"Dizzy" No Teacher
"Dizzy Dean? Well from what I
can remember, his newspaper clip-
pings were slightly exaggerated, but
he surely wasnt' much of a teacher.
When he'd have a group of us for
special instruction, he'd rather
ramble on his own experience than
teach us how to pitch."
Out of the 300 odd students in the
school that summer some 65 received
try outs in organized ball. The best
of the lot or at least the player who
made the most progress was Joe
Rogalski, who was up with the Tigers
and is n'ow pitching for Toledo.
"I could have had a try out in a
class D league myself," said the Mich-
igan sophomore star, "but I was very
young, only 16 at the time, and I was
advised to wait. Besides I was anx-
ious to go to college."
And well that Bond had the early
inclination for an education. With
four convincing relief performances,
to his credit, he now ranks as Coach
Ray Fisher's "ace in the hole," the
fellow who takes over when one of
the starters falter. And a starting
role looms in the near future if he
continues his good work.
f McCosky Hitless
As TigersLose, 2-1
CHICAGO, April 27. -P) De-
troit's Tigers, who defeated the White
Sox in 14 innings the last time they
met a week ago, tried the long course
against the Chicagoans again today,
but were edged out, 2 to 1, on Hank
Steinbacher's pinch single with one
out in the 13th.
The day was a miserable one for
Barney McCosky, the sensational
Tiger rookie who is leading the Amer-
ican League in batting. Up five times
today, McCosky failed to get a hit.
He struck out once, popped out twice
and grounded out once.
We dont
like to
appear
MERCENARY
b in
* Being upstairs puts us,
in a sense, "over our over-
head"-and we gladly pass
the savings on to you!
Drop in and acquaint
yourself with lower prices
that bring the some high
quality merchandise that
would demand considerably

PRESS PASSE S
By BUD BENJAMIN
The Baseball Filch
ARE THE major league baseball scouts ruining the college brand of ball?
Are the timber seekers jerking the baseball youth out of our universities
by means of the bankroll, parental pressure, and glowing promises of
glory at the expense of an education?
In the current issue of the Saturday Evening Post, Justin M. (Sam)
Barry, baseball coach of the University of Southern California, answers
with a vehement and vindictive "yes" in "Baseball Gets 'Em Too Young."
The problem is well worn and still unsolved. Yesterday I mentioned
the cases of Detroit's Barney McCosky and Charley Gehringer. The
former was sealed and ready for delivery to Michigan when Wish Egan
Tiger scout, turned him into the pro ranks. The latter was a freshman
here when he was enticed into the money game.
Yet these two examples, especially in sight on the Barry anaiygis, are
hardly reprehensible. McCosky w .s never officially a member of the Uni-
versity; Gehringer's scholastic aptitude did not merit a further pursuit of
academic activities.
Barry has a real axe to grind, for according to him, he has been victim-
ized and haunted by those quiet guys who talk to the boys after the game
for many years. Complains he: ,
"This is certainly the least savory side of baseball as a business. It
results in college coaches paying more attention to the chance of garnering
bonus dollars from the big-league clubs for tips on talent than to the best
interests of the boys they coach. It results in depriving some college players
of educations they are going to need badly. It results in some big-league
material being ruined before it is ripe, because the boys are rushed into
the professional game before they are ready for that kind of competition."
BARRY illustrates with the cases of Johnny Berardino, rookie second
baseman for the St. Louis Browns this year who was yanked out of
Southern Cal by Scout Jacques Fournier, and Joe Gonzales, the property
of the Boston Red Sox who finished his education. Gonzales, claims Barry,
has an economic cushion to lean upon in case he flops in baseball, for
he has a degree in physical education and is working for his master's degree
in the off season. Berardino has nothing.
The writer emphasizes the scope of the scouts' activities and the
methods which they employ. "These scouts," he reports, "are armed
with pretty formidable bank rolls. No school is too small for them to
find if they hear of a baseball prospect. And their free-lance subordinates
are legion. The butcher, the baker, the high school coaches, sports writem
and many others are synthetic alumni of the national sport." Barry
adds that he has heard rumors that a professor at California serves in
this capacity for Cincinnati.
To illustrate his case, Barry alludes to the enticement of Freddie Hutch-
inson out of the University of Washington, Joe Gordon from the University
of Oregon, Jerry Sheean from Fordham, and Francis Kelleher from St.
Mary's., Against these, he pits the formidable list of those who have gradu-
ated-Lou Gehrig of Columbia, Sam Chapman of California, Luke and Joey
Sewell of Alabama, Mickey Cochrane of Boston College, Frank Frisch of
Fordham, Christy Mathewson of Bucknell, and an imposing array of other
alumni.
THE FOOTBALL system, declares the author, must be applied to baseball.
9an you imagine, he asks, what would have happened if some Eastern
pro club woud have jerked Davey O'Brien out of Southern Methodist dur-
ing the middle of last season? They would have probably summoned the
Texas Rangers.
Professional football has agreed that no boy shall be signed until
either he, or the class in which he registered, has graduated. Thus a
player entering school in 1939 cannot be approached until 1943. The
balance system should also be used whereby the weakest team gets
priority in the draft.

Netters Beaten
9-0, By Strong
Maroon Squad
Michigan Wins Two Sets;
Match Forced Indoors
By Inclement Weather
CHICAGO, April 27.--(P)-Michi-
gan Wolverines managed to steal two
sets from the champion Maroon net-
men today, but the midway aggrega-
tion put on the power in the pinches
and swept to a 9-0 victory over the
visitors. It was the opening meet of
the conference season for both teams:
Jim Tobin, Michigan's sensational
sophomore almost caused trouble to
Chet Murphy, the Maroon's number
one man, who was extended before
winning by score of 6-4, 6-2.
Kidwell, Porter Win Sets
Though last year Michigan did not
win a single set from the Maroons in
their dual meets, today John Kidwell
and Jim Porter, playing number three
and six respectively each managed to
win one set. Kidwell won the second
set of his match 7-5 after it had
been changed to the field house be-
cause of a slight drizzle which made
play outside impossible. He lost the
match 3-6, 7-5, 1-6. Porter won his
second set 6-3, losing the others 6-1,
6-1.
Only one single match was played
inside but all the doubles contests had
to be settled under the protection of
the field house. Michigan meets
Wisconsin on the midway courts to-
morrow.
Summaries
In the singles, Chester Murphy (C)
defeated Tobin (M), 6-2, 6-4. William
Murphy (C) defeated ercival (M),
6-1, 6-0. Shastrom (C) defeated Kid-
well (M) 6-3, 5-7, 6-1.
Krietenstein (C) defeated Durst
(M) 6-1, 6-3. Jorgenson (C) defeat-
ed Morris (M) 6-1, 6-3. Atkins (C)
defeated orter (M) 6-1, 3-6, 6-1.
In the doubles, Murphy and Mur-
phy (C) defeated Tobin and Kidwell,
(M) 6-2, 6-2, Jorgenson and Shos-
trom, (C) defeated Morris and Durst
(M) 6-2, 6-2. Krietenstein and At-
kins (C) defeated Percival and Woos-
ley (M) 6-1, 6-1.
CORRECTION
The Daily, in yesterday's edition,
erroneously reported the death in
Bay City a few years ago of Cedric
Smith, a former Michigan all-
American football player. Smith is
still living and is at present em-
ployed by the Ford Motor Co. The
Daily regrets this error and wishes
to take this opportunity to correct
it.

HIKE and BIKE
SAIL and SWIM,
at low cost in
0You'll be surprised at how little it
takes to get around in Germany! Go
this summer. Meet and rub elbows
with the happy, informal groups of
nature loving fellow-students in eager
quest of ever glamorous scenic beauty.
Knowledge fills you as you hike, bike
or faltboat to the great enduring land-
marks of Germany's age-old art and
culture.
Visit historic cities:-heralded
Heidelberg, glamorous Berlin, Wag-
ner's Bayreuth. sublime Beethoven's
Bonn, great Goethe's Frankfurt-on-
Main, the lovely Rhine-kissed Koblenz,
melodious mirthful Vienna hallowed by
the immortal spirits of Mozart, Strauss
and sweet, lyrical Schubert.
At night, after zealous eventful days,
relax in the truly inexpensive, restful
quarters awaiting you at modest-priced
hotels, or at one of the 2,000 intelli-r
gently planned Youth Hostels. Here
travel-loving groups win and welcome
you into the composite charm of folk
songs, country dances, tales from
legend lore and sincere, simple friend-
liness.
p/Redlctions in Rail cares 0
Jd "Travelldarks"saveabou o
Consult your Travel Agent and write for
booklet "C"
GERMAN RAILROADS
INFORMATION OFFICE
11 WEST 57th STREET, NEW YORK, N. Y.

New Styles First at WILD'S
Cable stitch knits in the British
Manner. Fine hand framed
cable stitch, sleeveless in all
colors.
$2.50
WILD & CO.
St ate Street on the Caumpuis

more, were we
floor!
Neckwear
at $1.00

on the street
Shirts
at $1.65

MARQUARDT"S

Men's
334 S. State -

Shop
Second Floor

Siegel Matched
With Canadian
In Opening o
Michigan Pugilist To Face
Fred Hollis At Detroit
In Pro. Start Tuesday
After wading through two months
of red tape, Michigan's Don Siegel,
amateur heavyweight fight sensation,
will tangle with his first professional
opponent at Arena Gardens in De-
troit next Tuesday night.
Promoter Sam Rosenthal yester-I
day named Freddie Hollis of Kitchen-
er to be Siegel's first foe in the four
to be Siegel's first foe in the four
round bout which is the semi-final
event on the night's card. Hollis is
27 years old and has made something
of a reputation in Canada in his 14
! professional fights. He stands six
feet two and weighs 193 pounds which
gives Siegel a 12 pound weight ad-
vantage.
Siegel In Good Shape
Co-manager Vern Larson is en-
thused over his protege's chances.
"Don is now in fine shape," he said
yesterday, "and we're all set to go.
His workouts with heavyweight
Johnny Whiters have done him a lot
of good." Siegel has been working
with Whiters, a Flint fighter of
note, regularly during the past two
weeks.
Meanwhile, in Detroit, the sport
writers have been giving co-manager
Harry Baxter a few editorial lectures
just to make sure that he doesn't be-
come more interested in the coin
than in the possibilities of the Michi-
gan gridiron star.
Newcomers Feature Card
The remainder of Tuesday night's
fight card is also designed to give
some of the "up-on-comers" a chance
to show their ability. In the first of
the twn final bouts, Benny Gold-

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FIRST CHURCH OF CHRIST, SCIENTIST
ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN
ANNOUNCES A
FREE LECTURE ON CHRISTIAN SCIENCE
ENTITLED
CHRISTIAN SCIENCE: ITS COMPASSIONATE AND LOVING MINISTRY
BY
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PASADENA, CALIF.
MEMBER OF THE BOARD OF LECTURESHIP OF THE MOTHER CHURCH
THE FIRST CHURCH -OF CHRIST, SCIENTIST,
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