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February 18, 1939 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1939-02-18

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Will Play

At Frosh

Frolic Friday,

March

I

Jeanne Burt Will Appear At Pay-Off

Puerto Rican Disagrees - - Four
Out Of Five Are Beautiful, Yes?

Artist's Dance

11

I

To Be Oriinal
Tickets Can Be Purchased
At Desk In League Lobby
Jeanne Burt '40Ed, will dance at
the Pay-Off, to be given from 9
p.m to 1 arm. Fridav it was an-

r(eddings
k and .

I ngagements
Mr. and Mrs. Rex MacKenzie of
Oak Park, Ill., recently announced

j . VV 1 6.1[ . , J7 1u v~o C
nounced yesterday by Janet Fullen- the engagement of their daughter,
wider, '39, chairman of entertainment. Mary Alice, to Richard Myer, son of
Miss Burt, a transfer from Denni- Mr. and Mrs. L. E. Myer, also of Oak
son University in Ohio, will be ac- Park. Miss MacKenzie, a member of
companied by Ward Allen, '39L. Her Delta Gamma sorority, will be grad-
dance is a jazz-toe number of her own
innovation. She appeared recently as uated from the University in June.
the guest of Bob Steinle at the Union. After obtaining nis master's degree
McKinney's Cotton Pickers will play from Purdue, Mr. Myer took further
for the dance which is an informal graduate work at Carnegie Tech. He
affair sponsored by Mortar Board, was affiliated with Alpha Chi Rho
senior women's honorary society. fraternity.
Tickets are $1.50 and can be secured The engagement of Miss Marjorie
at the desk in the lobby of the League Lewis to Lyman Morse Darling was
or from members of Mortar Board. announced recently at a tea in the
The dance was originated last year Delta Gamma house by Mrs. K. D.
with the idea of having it become Lewis, of S. Forest Ave. Mr. Darling
traditional. Sweaters and skirts are is the son of Mrs. Louella Darling, of
worn, and the women extend the in- Pawtucket, R.I. Miss Lewis is a
vitations. graduate of the University and was
Jenny Petersen, president, is chair- affiliated with Delta Gamma sorori-
man of the dance and her committee ty. Mr. Darling was graduated from
consists of Barbara Heath, chairman St. John's College, Annapolis, Md.
of music and ballroom; Jean Hol- The wedding will take place in St.
land, ticket chairman; Norma Curtis,{ Andrew's Episcopal Church at high
chairman of favors; Grace Wilson, noon, March 18.
patrons chairman; Marcia Connell, Miss Cornelia Davidson, daughter
publicity chairman, and Miss Fullen- of Mr. and Mrs. William Olin Cov-
wider. ington of Port Huron, will be mar-
Last year's entertainment was pro- ried to Chase Osborne, III., son of
vided by Marie Sawyer, '39, and Doug- Mr. and Mrs. Chase Salmon Osborne,
las Gregory, '39, who danced three ( II., of Long Beach, Calif., at 8:30 p.m.
novelty numbers, accompanied by today in Port Huron. Miss Davidson
Jimmy Raschel and his orchestra. was a student at the University and
a member of Kappa Alpha Theta
sorority. Mr. Osborne also attended
InstructiOn In Life fthe University and was affiliated with
CW 41A%-1Delta Kappa Epsilon fraternity.

By DEBS EARVEY
Gabriel Fuentes, '39E, of Spanish
descent but a native of Puerto Rico,
likes the University of Michigan for
its democracy and its women students.
"On our island," he said, "there are
distinct social classes. If you come
from an old family which is well-
known, you are accepted without
question in society. But if your family
isn't known, you are not one of this
socially acceptable group. Up here,
there is no distinct line. You often
can't tell the difference."
Puerto Ricans More Considerate
On the other hand, Fuentes says
that in his country Negroes and
mulattoes are treated with much more
consideration and respect than they
are given in United States, even in
the north.
As to Michigan women, the-man-
with-the-accent simply stated that he
likes them and that he begs to differ
with the gentleman who thinks that
four out of five women are beautiful
and the fifth comes to Michigan. He
preferred not to be quoted on specific
examples to support these statements.
Fuentes transferred to Michigan from
the Unive'rsity of Puerto Rico, where
he studied engineering. When asked'
to compare the two schools, he re-
plied that work at the University of
Puerto Rico is conducted in much
the same manner as it is here, English
textbooks being used, although recita-
tion is always given in Spanish.
Univesrity Less Interested
But outside the classroom, the uni-
versity has much less interest in the
student's life than at this university.
There are no regulations for men'

about automobiles, rooming houses,
or the use of liquor.
An interesting difference in socialI
custom can be noted in the conven-1
tional courtship of Puerto Ricans.
Young women of good familiesalmost
never "date" unescorted. At dances,
movies, or even on walks, the couple
are escorted by her parents or friends.
But even escorts are human, and will
occasionally loosen the apron-strings
a bit. "It's more or less like a game,
you know?" Fuentes smiled.
But before a man may begin to
~"date" a young woman, he must ob-
tan consent from her father. When
he wishes to marry her, again he
asks for her father's permission.
If Fuentes is a true product of his
environment, we may assume that
Puerto Rico, "where it is always
spring," is a place where one is con-
tent with the present and optimistic
about the future.
This laughing, black-eyed Spaniard
from the West Indies was in difficulty
about his program at the time of his
interview. "I have taken many of
the wrong courses," he confessed.
"Now my schedule is so confused. But
.when things get too mixed up, I just
close my eyes and wait till they get
better." And with another quick grin
he dismissed his troubles.
Honor Deans With Dinner
Dean Alice Lloyd, Dean Jeannette
Perry, and Dean Byrl Bacher were
dinner guests of Kappa Alpha Theta
Thursday. Following dinner coffee
was served in the living room before
the group broke up to attend the lec-'
'ture at Hill Auditorium.

Interviews Continue
MondayAt League
Interviewing for League Under-
graduate and Judiciary Council po-
sitions will continue from 3:15 p.m.
to 4:45 p.m. Monday in the Under-
graduate office of the League, Sybil
Swartout, '39, chairman of Judiciary
Council, announced yesterday.
Only those who were unable to be
interviewed this week because of ill-
ness will be interviewed, Miss Swart-
out said, and it will be necessary for
them to present a doctor's or house-
mother's excuse verifying their ill-
ness.
Regular interviewing was conclud-
ed yesterday at 5:30 p.m. Only two
positions are open to sophomores,
both of them as junior members of the
Judiciary Council. A third senior
member of the Council will be named,
in addition to officers of the League
and committee heads, Miss Swartout
said.
Manager Urges Prompt
Play-Offs In Badminton
All players in the women's singles
badminton tournament are asked to
play off the first round as soon as
possible, Florence Corkum, '4lEd, an-
nounced. All students wishing to
enter the women's doubles tourna-
ment may sign up at Barbour Gym-
nasium.
The women's badminton club holds
regular meetings from 4:15 p.m. to
5 p.m. Fridays at Barbour Gymr1a-
sium. Men are invited to play from
7:15 p.m. to 9:30 p.m. Wednesdays.
Anyone interested in joining the
club is invited to attend the meet-
ings at any time, Miss Corkum said.
Racquets will be provided for a fee
of 25 cents a semester.

!Saving Is Offered
A class in senior Red Cross life
saving for women will be given from
3 p.m. to 4 p.m. Mondays and Wed-
nesdays at the Union pool, it was an-
nounced yesterday by the women's
physical education department.
The course, which will begin Mon-
day, will last the remainder of the
present sports season. It will be
completed in time for pupilsrto take'
their examiner's tests in April, when
the field representative will come. The
senior life saving test is a prerequis-
ite for examiners.

Initiations Are Announced
By Alpha Gamma Sigma
Alpha Gamma Sigma, independent
women's sorority has recently added
four new names to its list of initiates.
The new members are Norma Bennett,
'41, Roberta Ferguson, '42A, Betty
Myers, '41 and Tenby Larson, '41.
Before their initiation the pledges
were entertained at dinner by the
sorority.
The sorority's second semester
rushing will begin with a tea to be
given Sunday at the League.

AdML
0

'

CHURCH

DIRECTORY

I

r,

SEASON- END
Fur Sale

...,
. ).
y«-.
t; .
:,
>' .s:

Now! For Spring!
There are many smart
little furs for Spring
among our February
values like lovely Silver
Fox boleros.

HILLEL FOUNDATION
East University at Oakland. Dial 3779
Dr. Bernard Heller, Director
Dr. Isaac Rabinowitz, Associate Director
Sunday 7:30 P.M. Prof. Samuel A. Goudsmit
will speak on "Some Implications of Mod-
ern Science."
Tuesday, 3:00 P.M. Elementary Modern He-
brew Class.x
4:30 P.M. Classical Hebrew Class.
8:00 P.M. Photography Club meeting.
Wednesday 7:30 P.M. Avukah meeting.
Thursday, 4:45 P.M. Classical Hebrew Class.
8:00 P.M. Class in Current Jewish Problems.
Topic: "Problems of the Synogogue as an
Institution."
Friday 3:30 P.M. Post-Biblical Hebrew Class.
8:00 P.M. Services. Dr. Bernard Heller will
speak. Topic: "The Implications of the
Chosen People Idea."
UNITARIAN CHURCH
Corner State and Huron Streets
Rev. Harold P. Marley, Minister.
An Open Door for the Open Minded.
11:00 A.M. Guest speaker, Rev. Hubert Dukes,
the Congregational minister at Jackson'
He will speak on "Defenders of God."
7:30 P.M. Liberal Students' Union.
9:00 P.M. Coffee Hour.
PILGRIM HOLINESS
The friendly little church around the
corner.
Fountain Street at Miller Avenue
Rev. Emil A. Shetler, Pastor
10:00 A.M. Sunday School.
11:00 A.M. Divine Worship. Sermon by Dr.
C. E. Moran of Newark, Ohio, who is con-
ducting revival services here.
7:00 P.M. Young People's Society.
7:45 P.M. Congregational Singing.
8:00 P.M. Sermon by Dr. Moran. A group of
students from the Bible Holiness Seminary,
Owosso, will furnish special music and
singing for all services Sunday.
7:30 P.M., Thursday. Prayer Meeting.
FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
1432 Washtenaw Avenue. Dial 2-4466
William P. Lemon, D.D. Minister.
Elizabeth Leinbach, Assistant
Palmer Christian. Director of Music.
9:30 A.M. Church School. Classes for all
age groups.
9:30 A.M. Sunday Morning Levee of the Mr.
and Mrs. Group.
10:45 A.M. Morning Worship Service.
"WHOM GOD HATH JOINED."
Sermon by the Minister. Student choir.
6:00 P.M. The Westminster Guild will meet
for supner and fellowshin hour which will

BETHLEHEM EVANGELICAL CHURCH
Theodore Schmale, Pastor.
432 South Fourth Avenue. Dial 7840
9:00 A.M. Early service (conducted in Ger-
man.)
9:30 A.M. Church School.
10:30 A.M. Morning Worship. Sermon: "The
God Behind the World."
6:00 P.M. Student Fellowship. Illustrated
talk on Mexico will be given by Rev. H. P.
Marley.
7:00 P.M. Young People's League.
FIRST CHURCH OF CHRIST, SCIENTIST
409 South Division Street
10:30 a.m. Sunday Service
11:45 a.m. Sunday School for pupils up to the
age of 20 years
7:30 p.m. Wednesday Evening Testimony
Meeting
Free Public Reading Rooms at 206 East
Liberty St. open daily except Sundays and
holidays from 11:30 a.m. to 5 p.m.
FIRST METHODIST EPISCOPAL
CHURCH
State and Washington Streets
Chas. W. Brashares, Minister.
Earl Sawyer, Minister
9:45 A.M. Student class at Stalker Hall.
10:40 A.M. Worship Service. Dr. C. W. Bra-
shares' subject: "Jewish God." Music is
an anthem by the choir: "Had We But
Hearkened." The offertory solo is "Lord
God of Abraham" from the Elijah. Mr.
Taliaferro is in charge of the music.
6:00 P.M. Wesleyan Guild Service at the
Church. Dr. Owen Geer is the speaker.
Fellowship and supper following the meet-
ing.
8:00 P.M. Young Married People's Bible ,
Study led by Dr. Brashares. Church parlors.
FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
512 E. Huron.
Dr. Howard Chapman, University Pastor.
John Mason Wells, D.D., Stated Supply.
H. R. Chapman, D.D., Student Minister.
9:30 A.M. Church School.
10:45 A.M. Worship. Dr. J. M. Wells will
speak on "Don't Be a Jonah."
6:00 P.M. Roger Williams Guild. Rev. W. R.
Shaw of Ypsilanti will speak.

I

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"'Where shall I go to buy
Dependable furs?"
Noteworthy, isn't it, that
the answer of so many un-
prejudiced people is . . . .
"ZWERDLING!" They may
know little technically
about furs. But an impres-
sive number of men who
have been around and who
do know values, have had
reason to recognize the de-
pendibility of Zwerdling
Furs. Someone among your
own friends has had the
same experience. Ask them
the question. "It's our best
advertisement!"
35 Years of Dependability
- 0t

iY
Smart
Black

GRACE BIBLE FELLOWSHIP

Undenominational
Masonic Temple

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