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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

April 05, 1939 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1939-04-05

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAI-LY

Eastern Colleges
Leave Slang Talk
To 'live' A ddicts
College slang, that mysterious cre-
ation of language by Joe College and
his girl, is dying a slow death. At least,
it is according to our neighbors in
Eastern colleges.-
It is no longer necessary for a col-
lege student to speak in a language
that is meaningless to anyone whose
interests aren't English Lit and rush-
ing sorority or fraternity pledges. One
of the several reasons for the slump
in slang is that the rug-cutting jt-
berbugs have taken over, and have
swung it so expertly that the average
college student can't and won't com-
pete..
From a sweet young thing attend-
ing a numnber one woman's college
whose tuition is more than the in-
come of an average family, comes
another reason. High School students
use so much slang that college stu-
dents try to get away from it just to
assert their superiority (sour grapes!)
She claimed that she couldn't even
talk to her younger brother w he e
school. They "just didn't speak the
same language at all."
As a substitute for such wacky
slang as "pitching woo," last year's
favorite, this year's collegians are go-
ing in for "cute comparisons." For
instance, "She's as subtle as a train
wreck," or "as sophisticated as Shir-
ley Temple," or they might even de-
scribe her as "neat as an unmade
bed.''
Bull sessions which seem to be here
to stay, are filled with phrases picked
from psychology courses. Students get
"vicarious thrills," instead of the old
fashioned spine chills.
Chrc Actmivties
Head 'To Be Fe Led
A dinner honoring Beth Leinbach,
assistant director of student work1
and church activities at the First
Presbyterian church, will be given at
6:30 p.m. tonight at the Union by
members of the Westminster Guild.
Miss Leinbach's resignation, due to
failing health, has been accepted by
the church board. After spending
part of the summer in travel, Miss
Leinbach plans to enter Columbia
University where she will take up
special courses.
Coller To Attend MeetingI
Dr. Frederick A. Coller, chairman
of the Department of Surgery in
University Hospital, expects to leave
Ann Arbor April 15 to attend the
meeting of the Society of Clinical
Surgery at Nashville, Tenn.

DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN
Publication in the Bulletin is constructive notice to all members of the University.
Copy received at the office of the Assistant to the President until 3:30 P.M.;
11:00 A.M. on Saturday.

WED)NESDAY, APRIL 5, 1939
VOL. XLIX. No. 136
Noti-es
Retirement Incomes: A suggestion
has been made that questions con-
cerning various phases of retire-
ment incomes as they affect members
of the Faculties be submitted to the
Business Office, with the understand-
ing that the questions are to be an-
swered in the University Record. This
arrangement might serve to clear up
any misunderstandings or problems
on this subject. Will you please,
therefore, send to me any such prob-
lems and I will try to answer them or
will refer them to the Carnegie Foun-
dation for the Advancement of
Teaching or The Teachers Insurance
and Annuity Association for solution.
Herbert G. Watkins.
Library hou's:
During the Spring Recess the Gen-
eral Library will be open as usual
from 7:45 a.m. to 10 p.m. daily, with
the following exceptions: the two
study halls in the building will be
open from 10-12 a.m. and 2-4 p.m.
,daily and the Graduate Reading
Rooms from 9-12 a.m. and 1-5 p.m.
daily.
The hours of opening of the De-
partmental Libraries will also be 10-
12 a.m, and 2-4 p.m.
Sunday Service will be discontinued
during this period.
Wn. W, Bishop, Librarian.
Presidents of Fraternities and Sor-
orities are reminded that membership
lists for the month of March are due
April 5 in the Office of the Dean of
Students.
The Automobile Regulation will be
lifted for the spring vacation period
from 12 noon on Friday, April 7, until
8 axm. on Monday, April 17.
Office of the Dean of Students.
Negro students interested in camp
counseling work and qualified in a
conibination of any of the following
skills may secure information regard-
ing positions at the University Bu-
reau of Appointments and Occupa-
tional Information, 201 Mason Hall;
Office Hours: 9-12 and 2-4.
Skills: swimming, boating, music
directing, handicraft, nature study.
Those qualified and interested may
be interviewed on Thursday, April 6.
University Bureau of Appointments
and Occupational Information.
Students interested in acting as rep-
resentatives for promotional work in
Visual Education may call at the

University Bureau of Appointments
and Occupational Information for
complete information. Requirements:
two years of college work, an auto-
mobile.
University Bureau of Appointments
and Occupational Information.
The University Bureau of Appoint-
ments and Occupational Information
has received notice of the following
United States Civil Service Examina-
tions. Last date for filing applica-
tion is given in each case.
Aerologist, $3,800, April 17.
Associate Geologist, $3,200, May 1.
Assistant Geologist, $2,600, May 1.
Chief, Wildlife Division, $4,600,
May 1.
Instructor of Skilled Trades, $1,800,
April 24.
Optional branches: Painting and
Decorating, Plastering and Cement
Finishing, Plumbing, Printing, Sheet
Metal Work, Shoe Rebuilding and
Art Leather Work, Steamfitting.
Automotive Mechanics, B 1 a c k-
smithing and Welding, Bricklaying,
Carpentry, Electrical Work, Farm
Mechanics, Industrial Arts (Includ-
ing Wrought Iron and Metal Work),
Laundry, Machine Shop, Masonry
and Plastering, Steam Engineering.
,Complete Announcements are on
file at the University Bureau of Ap-
pointments and Occupational Infor-
mation, 201 Mason Hall; Office hours:
9-12 and 2-4.
Congress. Independent Mens' As-
cociation announces an independent
incus' scholarship. Applications must
be made out to the Congress, and
mast be handed at the Union main
desk on or before Friday, April 7. To
be eligible one must be an unaffiliated
underclassman, having at least 60
credit hours with at least a B-C aver-
age, and one semester's residence at
the University. Students applying
must also be partly self-supporting
and in need of financial aid. For
further details on the form of the
application see the Congress bulletin
board in the Union lobby.
Academic Notices
Freshmen, College of Literature, Sci-
(Continued on Page 4)
Thor Johnson To Direct
Symphony Tomorrow
The University Symphony orches-
tra, under the baton of Thor John-
son, will present a concert at 8:30
p.m. tomorrow in Hill Auditorium.
The program will include Symphony
No. Seven in C major, Op. Posth. by
Shubert; Good Friday Spell from the
opera "Parsifal" by Wagner; Varia-
tions on an Original Theme "Enig-
ma," Op. 36 by Elgar.

Michigan Initiated
Traffic Engineering,
Morrison Reveals
The University has played an im-
potant part in the field of traffic
engineering, Prof. Roger L. Morrison
of the highway engineering depart-
ment revealed yesterday.
The department was the first in the
country to offer instruction in the
field of traffic engineering. The first
instruction was given in 1920, and
four years later the first course in this
field was offered here.
Michigan graduates have been
prominent in the organization of the
Institute of Traffic Engineers, Pro-
fessor Morrison continued. The first
president was Dr. Ernest P. Good-
rich, '98E, Professor Morrison was
the fourth, and it is thought that the

Finalists In Speech
Contest Meet Today
Finals in the first intra-depart-
mental speech contest of the semes-
ter will take place at 4 p.m. today
in Natural Science Auditorium.
Six students were chosen from a
group of 11 selected from each of the
speech 31 sections to compete in the
final contest. Those selected, in or-
der of presentation were: Robert
Baker, '40Ed, who will talk on "The
United States of Europe"; James
Frankel, '41, who chose "The Chicago
Fress Press" as his topic; Marvin
Eger, '39, will discuss "That German
-Goebbels"; Jane Grills, '41, who
will talk on "The Quiz Craze"; Mary
Meloche, '40, whose subject is "The
University Auto Ban"; and Beth O'-
Roke who will speak on "Women

MAKE
"SPRING
VACATION"
PL~~ASIN
ADVANC

sixth will be Hawley Simpson, '23E. Architects."
h.MM

LA SOCIEDAD HISPANICA presents
ANN ARBOR'S OWN EXPLORER
HARLAND DAN NER
in a LECTURE WITH MOVING PICTURES
LIFE WITH THE LACANDONES

LYDIA MENDELSSOHN THEATRE
April 5, 8:15 P.M.
All Seats Reserved, 35 cents

Wednesday Evening

I

1f

Phone 6300

"AS MODERN AS THE
WORLD OF TOMORROW "
THE NEWMAN CLUB

fi
s:t;r.
..
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:>:
t{"'"
.'.ti'
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f.::t: . S'.:
:.':.^lJ.:'
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. . ..
' ;3;; iC4i:

APRIL 21 st

9:00 - 1:00

. ...Y:.

Tickets now on Sale

Get the most out of every
golden hour of Spring vaca-
tion! Make your plans by tel-
ephone before you leave Ann
Arbor. Gives the folks a
"'ring." Call your out-of-town
friends whom you expect to
see, and plan some good times
with them! It's fun to tele-
phone . . . and it costs sur-
prisingly little, especially after
7 any night or any time on
Sundays when long distance
rates are lowest.
FOR RATES to points not
shown below, see page 5 in the
telephone directory, or dial
110.
RATES FOR 3-MINUTE
STATION-TO-STATION
CALLS

at the UNION.

e74usic by

BILL SAWYER

LM

- I*I~

Classified Directory

Li

FOR RENT
FOR RENT-Newly decorated first
floor double room, shower bath.
Also garage. Phone 8544. 422 E.
Washington. 596
LOST
LOST-Silver bracelet at Slide Rule
Friday night. Finder please call
Dale Galbraith at 9-852. 598
H. W. CLARK
English Boot and Shoe Maker
0 Our new repair department, the
best in the city. Prices are right.
438 South State and Factory on
South Frest Avenue.

LOST-Silver bracelet at Slide Rule
Friday night. Finder please call
Dale Galbraith at 9852. 598
WANTED - TYPING
TYPING--easonable 'ates. L. M.
Heywood, 414 Maynard St., phone
5689. 271
TYPING and Stenography, experi-
enced. Fred Dickens, 625 E. Liberty
(cor. State over Kroger's). Apt. 1.
Telephone 2-1129. 560
WANTED
WANTED-Clothing wanted to buy.
S u i t s, overcoats, typewriters,
watches. Sam pays the most. Phone
6304 for appointment. 388

MIJHIIM

GIFT SUGGESTIONS

ANN ARBOR to:

Wa

R

-,

Nights &
All Day
Sunday

LAUGHTON

Alma
Alpena
Atlanta,

Ga

Battle Creek
Bay City ...
Coldwater
Dallas, Tex:
Denver, Colo.
Flint .....
Grand Rapids

.60
1.10
.35
.35
.35
1.70
1.95
. , 35
.40

"TUNING P"
Ou~r speciality is tuning up
your radio -
6ur ser'vice men~ are experts
at radio restoration.
If your radio is not up to par
phone us or stop in and let
one of our "old maestro"
radio technicians improve
your reception.
W EMEYER'S
RAbiO SERVICE
ANY IVMAKE - -
Service Calls $1.00
Phone 3694 2?1 East Liberty

is
l

WANTED-A girl to take care of
small child during Spring Vaca-
tion. Call 6869. 599

i-

LAUNDRIES
LAUNDRY - 2-1044. Sox darned.
Careful work at low prices. 9
MISCELLANEOUS
ZWERDING'S 35 YEARS EXPERT
FUR STORAGE AND SERVICE
ASSURES YOUR FURS OF
LONGE LIFE AND SAFETY AT
NO EXTRA COST, PHONE 8507.
WE WILL CALL FOR YOUR FURS
561
WASHED SAND and Gravel, Drive-
way gravel, washed pebbles. Killins
Gravel Company, Phone 7112. 17
CASH PAID for your discarded
clothing. Claude Brown, 512 S.
Main. 311
HOME DECORATORS-Decorating,
painting. Budget plan if desired.
Dial 7209. 181
SITUATPION WANTED by cotiple in
V1fernity for kitchen, or porter
:Ind cook for 1939-1940. Cook can
bake everything. First class refer-
ences for appointment. Address
Box 20. 597

"COLOGNES
for SPRING"
LELONG'S WHISPER
from $1.00
CHANEL
CUIR DE RUSSIE
from $1.50
YARDLEY
LOTUS LAVENDER
from $1.00
WORTH'S "JE REVIENS"
from $1.50
SH IAPARELLI SHOCKING
from $4.75
EASTER CANDY
WHITMAN SAMPLER
$1.50 -b
WHITMAN
Miniature Chocolates
$1.00 lb
WHITMAN
FRUIT and NUTS
$1.00 fb

FINE PERFUMES
CHANEL No. 5
from $2.25
MARY DUNHILL
GARDENIA
from $2.50
LELONG'S INDISCRET
from $1.50
LELONG'S
OPENING NIGHT
from $1.25
WORTH'S IMPRUDENCE
from $1.75
EASTER BUNNIES
by GUND

Hillsdale.
lonia
Kalamazoo.
Lansing..........
Los Angeles, Cal
Marquette.
Marshal l
Mt. Clemens
New Orleans, La.
New York City.
Niles
Petoskey.

.35
.35
.35
.35
3.50
.85
.35
.35
1.65
1.00
.45
.65
.35
.35
.80
.60

11

Port Huron

Saginaw

Sault Ste. Marie..

50c

75c $1.00

Traverse City

trhnT tratin-7'rstsr
TUNG-SOL RADIO TUBES
for Your Auto and ome Radio

I

I

also

A toy of distinction and
quality.
WH ITMAN
KIDDY CANDIES
25c a box

MICHIGAN BELL

By

BUS!

4"AUl IhC CI CfrLED

- ~~I -V3IN .LuIil 9 II

111I

Ii

11

11

I

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