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April 04, 1939 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1939-04-04

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.81"GE TWO

TIDE MIC.HIGAN-DAILY

-I UESD A; APRiL 4, W9S

_ . _

i

Ruthven Speaks
Against Crime
Of Intolerance
President Outlines Factors
Of Tolerance In Speech
On CBS Hookup Sunday
Racial Clash Viewed
It is not a merit to tolerate, but
rather a crime to be intolerant, Presi-
dent Ruthven told a radio audience
Sunday morning in a nationwide
hookup of the Columbia Broadcast-
ing. System-
Speaking on "The Common Sense
of Religion" in the final broadcast of
the "Join the Choir" series, Dr. Ruth-
ven pointed out the chief factors in
the question of tolerance.
"The real Christian-Jewish tragedy
stands revealed as the tragedy of
man," he said. "It is the failure to
appreciate religion not as a matter of
the external observance of creeds and
dogmas, but as the unifying force in
the life of the individual and the co-I
ordinating factor in group living."
Religion Cheeks Injustice
Religion and education are funda-
mentally synonymous, he continued.
At less than their best they permit
and even encourage intolerance, self-
ishness and hatred, whereas at their
best they order life and make possible
a world in which injustice to the
humblest is an affront to all.
"Religion and education," he stat-
ed, "are meaningless unless expressed
in practical living. The love of jus-
tice, mercy and peace is inherent in
man, but it can never be enjoyed un-
less projected beyond the individual
to the group," Dr. Ruthven stated.
'We Need Schools'
"To attain the goal of mankind we
need schools dedicated to democratic
ideals, institutions of higher learning
which are universities not multiversi-
ties, church which recognize the cons
tributions of all religions; but most
of all we must have an appreciation
of the responsibiltiies of the individ-
ual. His great mission is to make his
emotions his servants rather than his
masters, employing faith, courage,
knowledge and experience to this
end," Dr. Ruthven said.
Heard with President Ruthven
were the Men's Varsity Glee Club'
under the direction of Prof. David
Mattern of the School of Music, the
regular Sunday morning quartet,
directed by Dr. Kenneth Westei-man,
and the Carillon, played by Sydney
F. Giles, University guest carillon-
neur. The program was under the
direction of Dr. Joseph E. Maddy, pro-
fessor of radio music instruction.
Myron Wallace, '39, was announcer.

Conant Offers
Restored Plan
Of Sepulchre
Restoration by architects of the
Holy Sepulchre in Jerusalem has tak-
en many forms, according to Prof.
Kenneth J. Conant, of Harvard Uni-
versity's Graduate School of Design,
in a University Lecture yesterday in
the Rackham auditorium.
Professor Conant will speak again
at 4:15 p.m. today in the Rackham
auditorium on the "Monastery at
Cluny" under the auspices of the In-
stitute of Fine Arts.
Declaring that he finds it hard to
accept all the traditional views con-
cerning the Sepulchre, Professor Con-
ant offered his restoration of the
burial-place of Christ. Every inter-
preter of the Sepulchre's design, in
the opinion of Professor Conant,
comes to a different conclusion. He
showed numerous slides as evidence
of the accuracy of his plan of restora-
tion.
Of the various relics of the wood
of the Holy Cross, Professor Conant
said, "We cannot be sure that the
wood found in the grotto beneath the
Sepulchre is part of the Cross used
in the Crucifixion."
Radio Season
oEndFrida
Abbot Reviews Activities
Of Broadcasting Unit
The University Broadcasting Serv-
ice will close its ,14th season on the
air with the High School Forensic
broadcast at 3 p.m. Friday, according
to Prof. Waldo M. Abbot, director.
The Broadcasting Service will re-
sume its activities in the second week
of the summer session, presenting at
that time, eight 15 minute programs
per week for five weeks. These pro-
grams will include round table dis-
cussions by various groups meeting at
the University, faculty talks and stu-
dent presentations. .
The Broadcasting. Service has in-
cluded among its many programs this
season, the nationwide broadcasts of
the Michigan Day Celebration, of
President Ruthven's tolerance discus-
sion and Music Makers of Dr. Joseph
E. Maddy, professor of radio music
instruction.
Local programs include marital re-
lations talks by prominent members
of the faculty, elementary. and hymn
singing classes, book reviews, litera--
ture discussions, classes in diction and
pronunciation, campus gossip and
variety programs, American histori-
cal sketches, debates, dramatizations
of short stories, sports resumes and1
many other discussions.

Long Distance School For Many
Provided By Extension Seriwce
t ,\
\'>'
Ny
, ..*
**
By MORT UNDER
If you don't like to go to classes, or would rather not look at your pro-
fessor, or would like to skip school by simply not opening the mail, get in
touch with the University Extension Service, which last year took care of over
4,000 through the mails . . . organized in 1936 as cooperative measure with
WPA . . . to provide opportunity for qualified high school students un-
able to attend University . . . students include convalescents, CCC boyi
(over 1,800 last year), prisons, public night schools, private schools, and'
individuals . . . regular University credit allowed up to 30 hours . . . $10
fee for two hour course . . . Extension service last year reached more than
1,500,000 people, which sets it up as largest of its kind in the country . . .
radio broadcasts account for large portion of this figure, as do lectures,
library extension work, movies and the regular extension courses . . map
shows points in state reached by service . .
Pslay And Education Conined
In Wisconsin's Model Theatre
By HERVIE HAUFLER order that students can disc iss a pro-
Housing recreational facilities rang- duction in progress or a radio moni-
ing from radio studies to ping-pong tor can pick up a stage broadcast
tables, the University of Wisconsin's without disturubing the theatre audi-
model theatre is nearing completion. ence.
Designed on the theory that "cul- The laboratory theatre, which may
ture, recreation and formal education be used for movie productiI or radio
are inevitably and deservedly inter- rehearsal and broadcasting, i especi-
locked in every scheme of living," the ally suited for experimental_ work.
theatre building will include a main Removable side walls eliminate the
auditorium, a laboratory theatre, traditional proscenium ar and pro-
broadcasting studios and handicraft vide flexible acting space. The panels
shops. are so arranged that they will slide
An elevator forestage permits the back in turn to disclose separate epi-
conversion of the main auditorium sodes of a play without pause for
from 'a play setting into a concert scene shifting.
stage for orchestras, choruses, dance In the basement will be soundproof
recitals or lectures. Another novel bowling alleys, ping pong tables. and
feature is the arrangement by which other recreational facilities. Rooms
the auditorium may be reduced to for photography, metal work and oth-
two-thirds or one-half of its 1,300 er handicrafts will be upstairs, where
capacity to fit the audience expected. theatre workers can construct their
For detailed study of plays, the own sets. The ,building will also have
theatre has a row of boxes raised ample corridors that can be used as-
above the rear of the main floor. The art galleries, rehearsal rooms or in-
boxes have soundproof windows in formal meeting places.
The theatre was made possible by
a PWA grant, a private loan and the
SRAonsorsgifts of alumni, students, faculty
and friends. The theatre will be an
I+ addition to the university's $1,000,000
Talk OnEthics Union project.

DAILY OFFICIAL
BULLETIN

application before the close of busi- certificates must be lettered, signed,
ness on Wednesday, May 17. If ap-~ and sealed and we shall be greatlyr
plication is received later than May I helped in this work by the early filing

TUESDAY, APRIL 4, 1939
VOL. XLIX. No. 135t
Noticesf
Note to Seniors, June Graduates,
and Graduate Students: Please file
application for degrees or any spe-
cial certificates (i.e. Geology Certifi-
cate, Journalism Certificate, etc.) at
once if you expect to receive a de-
gree or certificate at Commencement'
in June. We cannot guarantee that
the University will confer a degree or
certificate Et Commencement upon
any student who fails to file such

17, your degree or certificate may
not be awarded until next fall.
Candidates for degrees or 3ertifi-
cates may fill out cards at once at
office of the secretary or recorder of
their own school or college (students
enrolled in the College of Literature,
Science, and the Arts, College of
Architecture, School of Music, School
of Education, and School of Fores-
try and Conservation, please note
that application blanks may be ob-
tained and filed in the Registrar's Of-
fice, Room 4, University Hall). All
applications for the Teacher's Cer-
tificate should be made at the office
of the School of Education.
Please do not delay untM the last
day, as more than 2,500 diplomas and

of applications and the resulting
longer period for preparation.
The filing of these mplications
does not involve the payment of any
fee whatsoever.
Shirley W. Smith,
The University Bureau of Appoint-
ments and Occupational Information
has received notice of the following
United States Civil Service Examina-
tions. Last date for filing applica-
tion is given in each case.
Aerologist, $3,800, April 17.
Associate Geologist, $3,200, May 1.
Assistant Geologist, $2,600, May 1.
Chief, Wildlife Division, $4,600,
May 1.
(Continued on Page 4)

4

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For further information call
23-24-1, or stop in at 420 Maynard
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FOR SALE
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aquarium, bird cages and supplies.
562 S. Seventh at Madison. Phone
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WANTED - TYPING
TYPING-Reasonable rates. L. M.
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WANTED
WANTED-Clothing wanted to buy.
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WANTED-A girl to take care of
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WANTED--Male tutor for an 8th
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HOME DECORATORS-Decorating,
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you cannot gat will gladly arrangefor a Transfer, or a full return
of deposit money. All details comprleted here. without chaige.
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SUCCESS

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Tr* A AILY Cdassifi

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LYDIA MENDELSSOHN THEATRE
April 5, 8:15 P.M.
All Seats Reserved, 35 cents

Wednesday Evening

Phone 6300

I

i~,w4Speciai!

RYTEX

GKEYTNE

PRINTED STATIONERY

Van Tuinen Will Lead
Discussion Today
Protestant contributions to the de-
velopment of social ethics will be the
topic of a talk by Prof. Jacob Van
Tuinen of the philosophy department
at 8:30 p.m. today at Lane Hall.
"The Development of Social Eth-
ics" is sponsored by the Student Re-
ligious Association as a sequel to the
"Existence and Nature of God" talks
that gained wide-spread interest on
campus.
Dr. Isaac Rabinowitz of Hillel
Foundation gave the first talk on the
place of Judaism in ethical develop-
ment. Last Tuesday, Fr. Leon Ken-
nedy of Sacred Heart Seminary pre-
sented the views of Catholicism. He
emphasized the important place Jew-
ish ethics had in Catholicism, and
quoted Pope Pius XI in proof of the.
statement, as follows, "All Catholics
are spiritual Semites."
Music Program Held
The first interfraternity music ap-
preciation program was held at Chi
Phi fraternity Sunday under the
sponsorship of the Interfraternity
Council. The program was conducted
by Mary S. Fishburne of the music
school.
STUDENTS
I Have you sold
Fuller Brushes?
Good money for your spare
time until June 15. No sample
outfit required. Write for in-
terview in Ann Arbor.

BEER and SKITTLE$
and other aspects of Ann Arbor.
... However . .."-T he Daily
25 cents at the bookstores.
LastDayj
Fred MacMurray
Madeleine Carroll
"CAFE SOCIETY"
Daily 2 - 4 - 7 - 9 P.M.
Starting Wednesday!

11

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