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March 30, 1939 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1939-03-30

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

- i1WT FZ .

Physical Ed's
Win 1-M Swim
Championshipl
Victors Take First Two
Places In Final Event
For Narrow Triumph
By CHRIS VIZAS
By taking both first and second in
diving, the final event of the meet,
the Physical Education tank team
managed to nose out the Wolverines
by one point to capture the Independ-
ent swimming championship 39 to 381
last night in the Intramural pool.
From the 200 yard relay which
opened the meet, and which the Wol-
verines won, down to the last event,
the meet was a nip and tuck battle
between the Phys. Eds and the Wolves.
Fletcher Hall took third with 18
points, Robert Owen fourth with 3,
and the entries from the Senators
failed to take one place which would
garner them any points.
Gearhart Takes 220
With the exception of the 220 yard
free, style, which Dick Gearhart of
Fletcher Hall captured, all first places
went to the first two. teams. Maurice
Reizen took individual scoring honors
by capturing first in the dive, second
in the 50 yard back stroke, and third
in the 100 yard free style.
The real hero for the winners was
Joe Cole, who, after trailing Fordyce
Hartman, Wolverine, by four points
going into the final dive, a back-jack,.
scored five points to take second and
cinch team honors for his squad.
Earlier in the evening Hartman had
captured the 100 yard free style to
give the Wolverines a two point lead,
which they did not relinquish until
the final event.
Hackett Places In 100
Herb Hackett of Robert Owen
House scored the only points for his
outfit by taking second in the 100
yard free style. The only other second
that did not go to the first two teams
was the 50 yard breast stroke which
Emmett Conway of Fletcher Hall
captured.
First place honors also went to
Phys. Ed's Al Jaslow, who won the 50
yard breast stroke, and John Ban-
oski, who copped the 50 yard free
style, and Art Blumberg of the Wol-
verines, who paced the field in the
50 yard back stroke.

PRESS' PASSES
By BUD BENJAMIN
A.L. N.L. is Dickey. Rolfe takes no hack seat,
New York Cincinnati Gordon Henrich, and Crossetti are
Boston New York trouble, and when you add such
Detroit Chicago
Cleveland Pittsburgh classy rookies as Charley Keller, Bud-
Washington Boston dy Rosar, and Joe Gallagher, I be-
Chicago St. Louis lieve you have a repeater.
St. Louis Brooklyn The Red Sox bandwagon is find-
Philadelphia Philadelphia ing support, notably by the Chicago
Amid threats of war, the cataclys- Daily News' erudite John Carmichael,
mic upheaval of Spain, German ex- and Yawkey's product may well turn
mi upheal rSp , the American League into a close
pansion in central Europe, and con- race--at long last.
tinued economic distress throughout~

the world-death, taxes, and baseball
hold fast as the only inevitable fea- I
tures of a hurly-burly 20th century
civilization.
Shaded a pretty cocoa and inflat-
ed by a deluge of their own press
notices, the representatives of 16 cor-
porations enter the 100th year of
Abner Doubleday's national past-
time with a single battlecry: "We're
the boys to do it. this year."
Of the 16, however, there are
really only about six "haves," the
others merely reaping the gate
receipts and going through the
formality of playing 154 games.
In the senior circuit, the touted
R1eds, the ever potent Giants, and
Phil Wrigley's Cubs are the likely
front runners. In the junior
league, tifose Yanks, a streng-
thened Boston Red Sox team, and
dynamic Detroit's own-the Tig-
ers-cain taste the pie.
Hot stove chatter advocating the
break-up of the Yanks has consider-
ably subsided since the scribes have
started to cram the sport sheets with
lusty yarns of the strength of the
other seven teams. Chief hope for
the demise of those dam' Yankees
are continued reports of Lou Geh-
rig's hopeless inadequacy at first,
base. 13 years of diamond pound-,
ing has taken its toll, and you'll hear
stories of Columbia Lou's sadly slow
reflexes, the woeful slowness of the
Yankee captain, and the contribut-
ing effects.
But this corner can't forget those
other boys. Pitching by Gomez, Ruff-,
ing, Pearson, Hadley, Ferrell, and
eccentric Oral Hildebrand, a new ac-
quisition. Di Maggio is still aces as

IT'S CLEARNESS TELLS YOU IT'S A
DELIGHTFUL DRINK y
ARBOR SPRNGS
O WATER
DELIVERED IN BOTTLES FOR
HOME, FRATERNITY, AND SOIORITY
Phone 8270

The Sox, who actually outhit
the Yanks last year .299 to .276
and split even with the champs
in 22 games, have added pitching
strength without weakening V
themselves doing it. They say
that Jim Tabor will make them
forget Pinky Higgins with Ted
Williams giving Ben Chapman a
similar treatment. Whereas last
year "Lefty" Grove was the only
dependable hurler, the Sox now
have Eldon Auker, Jake Wade,
and Dennis Galehouse after a
winter's barter. Jim Bagy, who d
won .15 games as a freshman, h
Jack Wilson and his fireball, 1
Fred Ostermuller, and a sensa- a
tional rookie named Woodrow
Rich will add plenty of mound
strength. Hitting by Foxx, Cram-
er, Cronin, Doerr, and Vosmik
spells plate power. In fact the
only Boston vulnerability seems
to be behind the bat where Gene
DeSautels and Col. Moe Berg
hold sway.
I can't see the Tigers for better,
than third-if they do that well. w
Hank Greenberg will be back, but I
Charley Gehringer is 36 and not as
fast as in those golden days; untried C
Frank Croucher holds the short-stop i
answer with fading Bill Rogell on
deck; and Rudy York was such a
poor defensive catcher last year that
his batting power was almost nulli- p
fied. The outfield of Pete Fox, Fredt
Walker, and Chet Laabs, a strike- f
out king, is nothing to write home
about. Returning veterans Bridges,
Coffman, Eisenstat, Kennedy, Law- t
son, and Gill, will need help, and
here's the rub. Should Schoolboy
Rowe come back, should the publi- C
cized Hutchinson, who has shown
signs of being a floperoo, and Dizzy
Trout come through, the Tige's may
be tough.
The other side of the fence
finds Bill McKechnie's lads get-
ting most of the play, chiefly on
the strength of the old adage
that pitching is 90 per cent of the
game. The Reds under cagy Bill
leapt from last in 1937 to fourth
last year, and a further rise seems
in order. A pitching powerhouse
featuring revived Lee Grissom,
Johnny (Double No Hit) Vander-
meer, Paul Derringer, Bucky
Walters, Whitey Moore, big Jim
Weaver, "Peaches" Davis, Gene
Schott, and r oo kie Junior
Thompson is mighty potent stuff
in any league. Ernie Lombardi
and Willard Hershberger should
provide the best catching in the
circuit and talent like Frank Mc-
Cormick, Ival Goodman, Harry
Craft, Wally Berger, and the
tempermental newcomer, Bill
Werber round out a top-notch
ball club.
The Giants and the Cubs have a
lot of "ifs." The Bartell, Leiber,
Mancuso for Demaree, Jurges, and
O'Dea swap may help both clubs and
may conceivably backfire. Competent
observers claim the Cubs stripped
their gears when they released Jurges.
The Cubs must rely on a mediocre
pitching staff with only Clay Bry-
ant and Bill Lee rated as depend-
able starters. They still need a first
baseman that can hit. They have to
worry about Dizzy Dean's arm along
with the stability of "youngster"
Mancuso and Hartnett behind the
plate.
The Giants still have Hubbell,
Schumacher, Castleman, a n d
Melton-none of them improved
by Wear-plus rookie Manuel
Salvo. Fat Zeke Bonura is a ques-
tionable jewel at first, and I can't
see Frank Demaree turning the
tide.
Sudden thought: Will Pittsburgh
and Cleveland rally and die before
the Fourth of July?
Add sudden thought: Didn't I pick
the Cubs to win the series? (EDI-

TOR'S NOTE-Yes).
York's Home Runs Pace
LAKELAND, Fla., March 29.-(P)-
Catcher Rudy York got two home
runs and a single in three times at
bat today as the Detroit Tigers de-
feated the Boston Bees 9 to 8 to
gain an even break in the spring ex-
hibition series.
Even with the big Indian's slug-
ging-he batted in four runs and
scored three times himself-the Tig-
ers had to stage a ninth inning rally
to win.

'

U

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How can I get a Job
in Advertising ?"

* Then here's frank, "inside''
advice-28 questions and answer
under the general titles "Should
I Go Into Advertising?" and
"How Can I Get Started?" Pre-
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"A Preface to Advertising," pres-
ident of a New York advertising
agency. Authoritative- inform-

ative. The only treatise of its
kind, showing how to prepare
yourself, how to appraise your
aptitude, where to find openings.
For your copy of "Advertising as
a Career," send $1 to Moday
Company, Room 1003, 400 Madi-
son Avenue, New York City.
Money back if not satisfied.

ems"T

w.(

t

fle~ut
SPRING STYLES
Suits
and Topcoafs
$22.50 to $40.00
Sport Coats
$12.50 to $19.50

Swe.a5ter s
$2.50 to $6.00

11111

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