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March 08, 1939 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1939-03-08

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MI CHIG AN DAILY

WEDNESDAY, MAWI,

mmWIN

Long-Awaited
'42 Case Club
Tests Tuesday

I

Victory in CasehClub competition,
dreamed of by hundreds of Law
School students who spend long hours
laboriously preparing their briefs,
Will be achieved by 10 freshmen stu-
dents in the near future. Finals, in
which 20 out of an original entry list
of over 200 will compete, are slated
for Tuesday in Room 220 Hutchins
Hall.
Judges To Be Decided
Later in the week, eight juniors
who have survived competition which
reduced their number from an orig-
inal 100, will take part in semi-final
competition that will decide which
four become Case Club judges next
year and, most important, which two
receive the coveted Campbell Award.
Arguing the legality of the pro-
posed federal tax upon state salaries,
Rtoy Steinheimer, Roy Rogers, John
Rubsam, Charles Dugan, Edward De-
vine, John Adams, Robert Solomon
and John Pickering will take part in
the junior competition. Faculty
judges to be announced later will,
judge their arguments, which take
place at 4 p.m. Thursday ari Friday,
March 16-17, in Room 220 Hutchins
Hall.
Will Argue On Chattels
Student and faculty judges will de-
cide upon the merits of the freshman
competitors who argue equitable re-
strictions on chattels-in plain terms,
whether Fred Waring's sweet an
swing should have been dished out to
the general public over a small radio
station despite a contract with the
recording company barring such per-
formance.
Finals for the junior competition
will be held on Founders Day, April
21, with the possibility that the Mich-
igan State Supreme Court will do the
final judging G

Announce New'
History Courses
Summer Faculty Includes
HaringAnd Nowell
Prof. Clarence H. Haring of Har-
vard University and Dr. Charles Now-
ell of Fresno StOte Teachers College,
Calif., will conduct course in his-
tory an the summer program of the
history department, Mrs. Arthur Van
Duren, secretary of the department,
announced yesterday.
The lecture course and seminar in
Hispanic-American history conduct-
ed by Professor Haring will be in
conjunction with the Latin American
Institute to be held here this sum-
mer. Dr. Nowell will give a couse
in American history.
Prof. Lewis G. Vander Velde, of
the history department,, will con-
duct a course in American constitu-
bional history at the summer session
of Ohio State University.
Dental Fraternity Holds
Joint Initiation Ceremony
Fight students in the School ,of
Dentistry were initiated into Alpha
Omega, dental fraternity, in a cere-
mony Sunday conducted jointly by
the local Chi chapter and by Alpha
Nu chapter of Detroit at the League.
Those initiated were: Henry Ber-
ris, '42D, Selvin Hirshon, '42D, Law-
rence Strauss, '42D, Sol J. Heilig-
man, '41D, Herman R. Kass, '42D,
Irving Katzman, '41D, Marvin M. Pos-
ter, '42D and Oscar Bean.
To Review Neibuhr Book
Kenneth Leisenring, '33, a graduate
student in mathematics, will review
Prof. Reinhold Niebuhr's "Moral Man
and Immoral Society" at the regular
Association Book Review meeting at'
4:15 p.m., Thursday, at Lane Hall.1

Morgenthau Seeks Aid For Business

By HERVIE HAUFLER
The value of trade agreements with
neutral states as a powerful weapon
in modern warfare was made evident
by the measures of the Allies duringI
the World War, Dr. Marion C. Siney,
'33, has shown in her recent research
as Alfred H. Lloyd, post-doctorial fel-
low this year.
Measures to cut off the flow of
goods to Germany by trade negotia-
tions with the border neutrals were
so successful during the war that Dr.
Siney foresees the use of similar mea-
sures in a future European conflict.
France and Great Britain have
learned what methods of this econom-
ic warfare are most effective and, if
war comes, can imnediately apply
them.
The importance of these measures
in the World War, Dr. Siney states,
was that they severely restricted Ger-
many from trade with countries which
were neutral. The commercial nego-
tiations made with these border states
built up a long-range blockade which
deprived Germany of easy access to
sources of basic supplies, virtually
starving the Central Powers into sub-
mission.
An example of the way these com-
mercial measures were used was the
quota system employed against the
northern neutral states of Norway,
Sweden, Denmark and the Nether-
lands. Controlling the English Chan-
nel and the North Sea, the British,
closely regulated the flow of trade to
neutral states so that these were not
permitted to secure a greater amount
of basic supplies than was necessary)
for their own people. With little sur-
plus, the neutrals were soon unable
to resell supplies to Germany.
Another instrument which Dr. Sin-
ey finds to have been used by the
British in blockading the Central
Powers was the Netherlands Overseas
Trust. The British required all trade
to be carried on through this asso-
ciation, which agreed in turn to
limit the trade of its members with
Germany. The Dutch were held in
line by the British control of supplies
essential to the Netherlands.

This relatively unexplored phase of
the war, Dr. Siney believes, was an
important contributing factor to the
ultimate defeat of Germany, since the
acute shortage of raw materials weak-
ened the fighting strength of the na-
tion. After the Armistice, the mea-
sures were continued in order to
coerce the Germans into signing the
treaty of peace.
Germany realizes that similar,
agreements will be made in the event
of another war, and Dr. Siney sug-
gests that the fear of this trade
strangulation has been one of the
chief factors in the German attempt
to be "self-sufficient."
Dr. Siney, after three months of
study in the Hoover War Library, is
now doing research work in the Brit-
ish Museum and will soon leave for
Paris to utilize materials in the li-
brary of the French Society for the
History of the War.
Scientific Bibliogr phy
Published By Curator
The annotated bibliography of the
papers of Bryant Walker, '79, Detroit
lawyer and natural scientist, who died
in 1936,' has just been published by
Calvin Goodrich, curator of mollusks
in the Museum of Zoology.
Mr. Walker published his first
scientific paper on land and fresh-
water shells when he was a student
at the University, working in collabor-
ation with C. E. Beecher, who later
became a professor of paleontology at
Yale.
DAILY 2-4-7-9P.M.
NOW - STARTING TODAY!
SPEED AND THRILLS!

World War Demonstrates Value
Of Trade Treaties, Siney States

Van Deursen Will Sing
In Hill Audi torium Today
Hardin Van Deursen, instructor in
voice in the School of Music, will be
guest soloist at the weekly organ reci-
tal of Prof. Palmer Christian, Un-
versity organist, at 4:15 p.m. today
in Hill Auditorium.
The program will be devoted almost
entirely to Negro spirituals. Mr. Van
Deursen has chosen five: "Deep Riv-
er'" "Were You There," "Crucifixion,"
"Ride On" and "King Jesus." Profes-
sor Christian will also play a fantasia
on two other spirituals: "0 Zion" and
"Swing Low, Sweet Chariot."
NOW
flast
heil: oxya
w i i

Calling upon all officials of the treasury department to suggest means
of helping business, Secretary Henry Morgenthau set an example by
posting a placard saying, "does it contribute to recovery?" on his desk.
The Secretary said the treasury's special interest in business improve-
ment now was that it was "tax bill time in the treasury."
Christian Science IsSeeley's Topic

Although sickness seems very real
in man's everyday experience, Christ
knew that it did not exist in the King-'
dom of God and thus he knew that it
was destructible, Paul Stark Seeley,
C.S.B., said in his address last night
in Hill Auditorium. The lecture was
sponsored by the Christian Science'
Organization of the University of
Michigan. John Rae, president of the
Organization, introduced the speak-
er.
Jesus was able to heal thousands of
sick persons by means of divine mind-
power, Seeley continued and Christian

Science is doing this same work today.
In conclusion, he said, "The forces of
infinite mind impel and compel pro-
gress in man."
This lecture, "Christian Science and
the Kingdom of God," is the thirty-
second annual lecture given by the
Organization, which was founded on
campus in 1904.
Seeley, who is a member of the
Board of Lectureship of the Mother
Church, The First Church of Christ,
Scientist, Boston, has spoken in Ann
Arbor several times and is well known
here.

----

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PICTURii ".

.....

DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN
Publication in the Bulletin is constructive notice to all members of the University.
Copy received at the office of the Assistant to the President until 3:30 P.M.;
11:00 A.M. on Saturday.

CLASSIFIE DADVERTISING

WEDNESDAY, MARCH 8, 1939
VOL. XLIX. No. 112
Noices
To The Members of the University
Council: There will be a meeting of
the University Council on Monday,
March 13, at 4:15 p.m. in RooM 1009
Angell Hall.
Retirement Incomes: A suggestion
has been made that questions con-
cerning various phases of retire-
mnent incomes as they affect members
of the Faculties be submitted to the
Business Office, with the understand-
ing that the questions are to be an-
swered in the University Record.. This
arrangement might serve to clear up
any misunderstandings or problems
on this subject. Will you please,
therefore, send to me any such prob-
lems and I will try to answer them or
\will refer them to the Carnegie Foun-
dation for the Advancement of
Teaching or The Teachers Insurance
and Annuity Association for solution.
Herbert G. Watkins.
AU students who competed in the
freshmen Hopwood contests should
call for their manuscripts at the Hop-
wood Room not later than Friday,
,March 10, at 5 o'clock. The room is
open every afternoon from 2 to 5:30.
The Rochdale Cooperative House,
640 Oxford Road, now has a few va-
cancies. Students wishing to apply for
membership may get application
blanks at Dean Bursley's office, or
may phone the house, 6.957.
Membership for meals alone will be
considered, if desired.
Choral Union Members: Members
of the Choral Union in good stand-
ing, will be issued pass tickets for the

Roth String Quartet Concert, Thurs-
day, March 9, between the hours of
9 and 12 and 2 -and 4. Members are
required to call in person and no tick-
ets will be given out after four o'clock.
Candidates registered with the Bu-
reau who have not reported their sec-
ond semester class schedules should
call immediately at the office and fill
out a location blank. 201 Mason Hall.
Hours: 9-12 and 2-4.
University Bureau of Appoint-
ments aAid Occupational hnfor-
mation. ,
The Bureau of Appointments has re-
ceived notice of the following United
States Civil Service Examinations:
Chief of Occupational Information
and Guidance Service, $4,600, April 3.
Specialist, Oc4cupational Informa-
tion, $4,600, April 3.
Specialist, Consultation- and Field
Seivice, $4,600, April 3.
Specialist in Occupations for Girls
and Women, $3,800.
Junior Multigraph Operator, $1,-
440, March 27.
Complete announcements are on
file at the Bureau of Appointments
and Occupational Information, 201
Mason Hall. Office Hours: 9-12 and
2-4.
University Bureau of Appointments
and Occupational Information.
Academic Notices
Philosophy 139 (Aesthetics) and
154 (Plato). Students enrolled in
these courses last semester may se-
cure their term papers by calling at
303 Mason Hall, Thursday, March 9,
2-3 and 4-5 p.m.
Mathematics Short Course: The
short course in the Analytic Theory
(Continueed on Page 4)

THE MICHIGAN DAILY
CLASSIFIED
ADVERTISING
RATES
Effective as of February 14, 1939
CASH ONLY!
12c per reading line (on basis of
five average words to line) for one
or two insertions.
10c per reading line for three or
more insertions.
Minimum of 3 lines per inser-
tion.
We have a Quick Delivery Serv-
ice at your disposal if you wish to
have your ad picked up (10c
extra).
For further information call
23-24-1, or stop in at 420 Maynard
Street.
LAUNDRIES
LAUNDRY - 2-1044. Sox darned.
Careful work at low prices. 9
LOST
LOST: Gold ring with blue stone
signet in Main Library Saturday
afternoon. Reward. 433
WANTED - TYPING
TYPING-Experienced. Miss Allen,
408 S. 5th Avenue. Phone 2-2935
or 2-1416. 79
H. W. CLARK
English Boot and Shoe Maker
r Our new repair department, the
best in the city. Prices are right.
438 South State and Factory on
South Forest Avenue,

TYPING-Reasonable rates.
Heywood, 414 Maynard St.,
5689.

L. M.
phone
271

MISCELLANEOUS
WASHED SAND and Giav1ei,'Drive-
way gravel, washed pebbles. Killins
Gravel Company, Phone 7112. 17
CASH PAID for your- discarded
clothing. Claude Brown, 512 S.
Main. 311
WANTED-Clothing wanted to buy.
S u i ts, overcoats, typewriters,
watches. Sam pays the most. Phone
6304 for appointment. 388
HOME DECORATORS-Decorating,
painting. Budget plan if desired.
Dial 7209. 181

WANTED TO RENT-Single room
for man. Must have more book-
cases than beds. Near campus. Box
13, Daily.
REFERENCE MAGAZINES - You
can get any magazines published
within last 45 years. Original price
plus postage. Drop card to Ruth
Rumbaugh, 533 N. Wells, Chicago,
for C.O.D. 434
STEAMSHIP
TICKETS & CRVISES
Your steamship passage to Europe, for this coming Spring do
Summer, should be reserved now. Phone or come in, choose
your *st&a smaldeposit will guarantee the space. if gofind
mou cannot go.l will gladly arrange for a transfer.ore fultreturn
of deposit money. All details completed here. without ehaige.
'Persn on*&rvo~ on every booking. sin". 1017. PX. 6412
KUEDLER TRAVEL BUREAU.,601 E. Huron St.. Ann Arbor

HENR ARTUR JAN VALERIE
HENRY ARMETTA " TOM BEk
BILL ROBINSON
Extra
PARAMOUNT PICTORIAL
CARTOON "Eliza Runs Again"
"Cupid Takes
A Holiday" News

A T-;R

CHARLE$ CO
JOSEPH SCHILI
Soon -- "WINGS OF

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BEST AUTHORS

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A vivid pictorial review
of the year at Michigan

PAGCAOE

I I

* Sports Events
* Senior Photos

III

I

,
,r

The Parade of Hits:

.4

1I

1 Co mp
EAL AMRCAZ{TDLETRZES

* Activities
* Party Life
* Fraternity
* Sorority

1937: "THEY TOO ARISE."

1938:

"ROOTS"

wt~ 1
GEORGE axe MARTHA
WASHINGTON
A picturesque Early American
treasure-type box, with two
cakes of toilet soap, talcum por-
Y der', and bath salts, all scented,

1
,

* Faculty
* Satire
* Humor

1939: HOSPITAL HILL

Presented by THE HILLEL PLAYERS

k ....i *,
* .,t
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with unforgettable Early Ameril
can OLDSPICE.

Includes two authentic silhouette
reproductions of George and
Martha Washington printed on

ADVANCE TICKET SALE now going on for "HOSPITAL HI LL"

* All for $4.50

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