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January 25, 1938 - Image 4

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The Michigan Daily, 1938-01-25

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PAGE FOUR

THE AlICI-II AN1 'DAILY

T F,,qD AY, JAN. >, 1.938

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

TUESDAY, JAN. 25, 1938

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Tell It To The Editor
The Campus Wailing IfVall Holds Open House . . .

4 4 4

Syncopationj

DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN
Publication in the Bulletin is constructive notice to all rembrs or thte
University. Copy received at the office of the Assistant to the Pre'4dent
until 3:30; 11:00 a.m. on Saturday.

_iN

:J

= r

71

Edited and managed by students of the U~nversity of
Michigan under the authority of the Board in Control of
Studen' Publications.
Purmxshed every morning except Monday during the
University year and Sumner Session.
Member of the Associated Press
The' Associated Press is exclusively entitled to the
use for republication of all news dispatches credited to
it or not otherwise credited in this newspaper. All
rights of republication of all other matter herein also
reserved
En a'sed at the PostOffice at Ann Arbor, Michigan as
second ;lass mail matter.
Subscriptions during regular school year by carrier,
$4.00; by mail, $4.50.
Member, Associated Collegiate Press, 1937-38
R3PRESENTED POR NATIONAL ADVERTIsING aY
NationalAdvertisingService Inc.
College Publishers Representative
420 MADI8ON AVE. NEW YORK, N. Y.
CHICAGO - BOSTON - Los ANGELES - SAN FRANCISCO
Board of Editors
MANAGING EDITOR..............JOSEPH S. MATTES
EDITORIAL DIRECTOR..........TUURE TENANDER
CITY EDITOR .................. WILLIAM C. SPALLER
NEWS EDITOR.................ROBERT P WEEKS
WOMEN'S EDITOR.................HELEN DOUUGLAS
SPORTS EDITOR.....................IRVIN LISAGOR
Business Department
BUSINESS MANAGER...............ERNEST A. JONES
CREDIT MANAGER ....................DON WILSHER
ADVERTISING MANAGER ....NORMAN B. STEINBERG
WOMEN'S BUSINESS MANAGER ........BETTY DAVY
WOMEN'S SERVICE MANAGER ..MARGARET FERRIES
NIGHT EDITOR: S. R. KLEIMAN
The editorials published in The Michigan
Daily are written by members of the Daily
staff and represent the views of the writers
only.
Thanks,
B. & G. . .

Thanks Prof. Slosson .. .
To the Editor:
Permit a teacher of history to express his deep
appreciation of the work which the editorial
board of the Daily has for some time been doing
in awakening the interest of the student body
in important national. and international prob-
lems. In this way you can be as truly an educa-
tive force as any department of the faculty, if
not more so. That occasionally an editorial con-
ains a statement which runs counter to my own
opinions is not alarming; what would be alarming
would be trite or conventional editorials aways
reflecting the opinions of older people, it would
mean imitation in place of thought. I am glad
that peace, civil liberty and economic justice are
more interesting than "Poo," "Foo," frats and
football. Ten years ago that was not so. Thank
you again. Cordially and appreciatively yours,
-Preston Slasson.
Kyser Is Too...
To the Editor:
Remarks in the column "Syncopation" con-
cerning the ability of Kay Kyser's orchestra has
led us to believe that the writer is not "up" on
the recent developments of the Kyser band. He
admitted a prejudiced viewpoint and, sad to
say, it is so prejudiced that he has forgotten to
investigate the band as it will appear here on
the eve of February 11.
Speaking of "whistling in the dark," it seems
that the writer is not only in the dark but a deep
purple haze in saying that J. Dorsey will be the
"only attraction" at J-Hop. We are willing to
stake our collection of current recordings of both
orchestras that when dawn breaks on February
12, Kay Kyser's "artificial, effete music" will rate
as high, (if not higher), in all-around popularity,
as "the only attraction," J. Dorsey. The student
body will at that time, we believe, despite their
"tiny tot unappreciative minds," still be unprej-
udiced enough to admit the excellent "swing"
qualities of Dorsey's band and yet praise the
all-around danceability and entertaining fea-
tures of a "three for a quarter" band.
We can appreciate a difference of opinion
on the ability of Kyser's band, but we do think
that the writer should conduct a little more
research before stating in such a positive man-
ner that Kyser will not uphold his share of the
evening's entertainment. 'Til dawn of February
12.
-Ted Miller.
-Les Eames.
On The Level

water
much

W E LIKE THE WAY the Building and
Grounds department is ditching the
off campus walks. It makes wading so
easier. Thanks.
Joseph S. Mattes.
Robert Fitzhenry.
William Spaller.
Roy Sizemore.
Tuure Tendander.
Earl R. Gilman
S.R. Kleiman.
Joe Gies.
Helen Douglas.
Wrag.
Disraeli.

Boo Hoo . .
To the Editor:
Every girls' dormitory and sorority house has
a house mother who tucks the girl in bed- every
night and sees that they do not drink too much
beer. Every fraternity house has a porter who
makes up the beds. These poor fraternity men
do not have the opportunities which the lowly
freshmen in Allen-Rumsey have. Like the girls.
these lucky freshmen are showered with the bless-
ings of a house mother who keeps them out of
mischief and protects them from the temptations
of college life!
She keeps the lonely vigil till the wee small
hours of the night in the hope of being able to
aid some erring freshman, coming home after a
strenuous evening at the Bell! Late hours of
course, are taboo. She secretly inspects the
rooms frequently, having keys to all of our pos-
sessions ,in an effort to improve the morals of her
subjects.
The magic eye which sees all, hears all, and
knows all, manages to keep tab on who, when, and
in what condition each inmate returns to the "cell
block" each night. The Spanish Inquisition had
nothing on the third degree procedures used in
the dormitory. It is evident that the Detroit
[louse of Correction trains its matrons well. The
"trusty" system works as well here as in the
prison from which it was introduced into the
dormitory.
On the whole the proctors are in sympathy
with the boys in their troubles, but of course, as
the old saying goes, "There is always one bad
peach in each bushel." If Allen-Rumsey had nine
men in charge like Mr. Peake, our faculty ad-
viser, everyone would be satisfied and certain of
a square deal.
-The Allen-Rumsey house.
I~ -m
eVWOO rO
H-eywood Broun
When a leader is lost the fault lies in part
with his followers. Many men in history have
fallen shamefully, but it seems to me that these
unfortunates should have the right to cry out to
their critics, "Why did you raise me up so high?"
I think it was a bad arrangement to admit Judas
into the apostolic fellowship,
in the first place.
But, skipping down through
the centuries, it must be ap-
* parent that there is a grave
tendency to confuse prin-
_ cipes and personalities.
Scripture advises us not to
put our, trust in princes. I
think the same thing holds
true of political and eco-
nomic leaders.
Captains are necessary, and no cause can get
far unless there are those who are willing to go
along with some, person or set of persons who
seem to be moving in the desired direction. Just
the same, even in the heat of battle it is well for
the enlisted man to keep his fingers crossed. He
should constantly bear in mind that the cause
in which he believes is of far greater importance
than any single individual.
This is not merely the counsel of captious
suspicion; it is common sense. There is a thing
called death. Even the finest leader is mortal.
Man should never hang his hat upon a heart-
beat.
The Mass, Not The Man
But short of dissolution, accident or change
of mind, it is silly to try to evaluate important
tides merely in little profiles of the men or
women currently in the headlines. There are
newspaper readers who have been led to believe
that "New Deal' and "Roosevelt" are synonyms,
and that the Committee for Industrial Organiza-
tion can be spelled out more simply by writing
"John L. Lewis."
I mention two individuals who seem to me .
to give brilliant service to the causes which

they represent, but they are factions in the com-
plete scope of the objectives to which they have
dedicated themselves.
Hero worship is specifically forbidden in one
of the Ten Commandments, and that line is still
a useful one for any party. Come to think of it,
I have always wondered why "doubting Thomas"
has never been recognized as one of the major
saints.
A Confessional Hour
Leaving sainthood out of it, I must confess that
I am a little worried because recently a piece
was "called to my attention," as the phrase
goes, in which a man accused me of being "given
to periodic crushes on strong men and move-
ments."
If this is true it is a grievous fault and I must
do something about it. But the same commen-
tator that went on to attack an organization in
which I take part on no better grounds than his
estimate of my own infirmities of character.
It was, on the whole, a somewhat charitable
portrait. I could a tale unfold which would
be far more horrendous.
I am not attacking the amiability of my op-
ponent but his logic. I thoroughly agree with
him that no cause should stand or fall upon the
fac+ that it i. Ire v nm -ngA manrfwinning

. By TOM McCANN
In our case against Kay Kyser et
al., (221 U.S., 31 S. Ct. 492, (N.S.)
824, 23, Skid Foo), the evidence con-
tinues to pile up, and the latest of
the amazing revelations is that some
people right here on this campus
place Kyser above Jimmy Dorsey!
Our aim, of course, is definitely not
one of convincing anyone that any
one band is better than another; the
destruction of personal tastes in this
minor regard would be fun but silly.
And we don't intend to create either
any enmity with anyone in our crit-
icism of any band because there was
a time (1928). when we thought the
Lombardoes were a particularly fancy
group.
Our main argument against the so-
called "styled" music of the Kyser-
Kaye-Barron school is that it is a hy-
brid in the light of the standards of
American dance music set by such
veterans as Paul Whiteman, Ted
Weems and Red Nichols. This last
group, we feel, represents the "real"
dance musicians of -the nation.
In a conversation yesterday with a
member of the popular music de-
partment of the Gargoyle on the Kay
Kyser question, our conviction was
confirmed that American dance mu-
sic is going straight to--. But this
person, no doubt, felt the same way
we do about Kay and his confeder-
ates.
But then our case against Messrs.
Kyser, Kaye and Barron continues.
Checking back, we see that we've been
guilty of a gross understatement in
our recent evaluation of the merits of
the members of the sway department.
Making our feelings a little clearer
in the matter, we believe today that
adding Shep Fields to the trio would
make a much more attractive bar-
gain, going at, shall we say, five cents
straight. This would give you a nice
mixture, 'rippling sway," which
should be something!
MUSIC
Calend'r
THURSDAY
Choral Union Concert, Gina Cigna
soprano, Fritz Kitzinger accompanist.
Songs and arias from Pergolesi, Dur-
ante, Gluck, Duparc, Ravel, Faure,
Verdi, Rachmaninoff, Gretchaninoff,
Cimara, and Respighi. 8:30 p.m., Hill
Auditorium.
FRIDAY
Heinz and Robert Scholz, pianists,
playing Bach's Art of the Fugue (Die
Kunst der Fuge). Written in 1749, the
last year of Bach's life, this series of
14 fugues represents the culmination
of contrapuntal genius. 1:45-3 p.m.,
NBC combined networks.
SATURDAY
Metropolitan Opera Company in
Wagner's Tristan und Isolde. Flag-
stad, Melchior, Wettergren, Huehn,
List, Artur Bodanzky cond. 1:55 p.m.,
NBC Blue.
Chicago Symphony, Frederick Stock
cond. Goldmark's Sakuntala Over-
ture, Andante and Scherzo from Mah-
ler's First Symphony, Elgar's Enigma
Variations, Ballet Music from Mas-
senet's Le Cid, Glazounow's Suite,
Rusesd 'Amour. 9:15-10:45,IBS.
NBC Symphony, Arturo Toscanini
cond. Overture to Rossini's Scala di
Seta, Schumann's Third ("Rhenish")
Symphony in E flat, Nocturne and
Scherzo from Mendelssohn's A Mid-
summernight's Dream music, Mous-
sorgsy-Ravel Pictures at an Exhibi-
tion. -W.J.L.
Frye Book List
The textbooksslistedebelow are avail-
able to students under the free text
book lending library plan. Applications
for use of books may be made through

academic counselors, or through the
offices of Dean Lloyd and Dean Bursley.
Students in the engineering college may
make application to Prof A. D. Moore.
Abbott. Waldo. A handbook of radio
broadcasting. 1936. (1 copy).
Alden, Raymond MacDonald. A
Shakespeare handbook. 1935. (1).
Arnold, Matthew. Selections from the
prose works of Matthew Arnold.
1913. (1).
Aydelotte, Frank. Materials for the
study of English Literature and
composition. 1916. (1).
Balzac, Honore de. Le Colonel Cha-
bert .1929. (1).
Baroja, Pio. Zalacain el adventurero.
1926. (1).
Bates, Arlo. Talks on writing English..
1901. (1).
Becque, Henry. Les corbeaux; piece en
quatre actes. 1925. (1).
Bement, Newton S. Cours de revision.
1935. (2).
Bement, Newton S. Manuel elemen-.
taire. 1933. (1).{
Boak, A. E. R., Hyma, A., & Slosson.
The growth of western civilization.
Pt. 1, 2 and 2c. of Pt. 2.) 1936. (3).
Bossard, James H. S. Social change
and social problems. 1934. (1).
Boyd, Martha. French. 1929. (1).
Brieux, Eugene. Blanchette; comedie
en trois actes. 1924. (1).
1 .1.- ,,a , ' , i

Time of Examination

Exam.
Group
Letter

Time
of
Exercise

First Semester

Second Semester

A
B
C
D
E
F
G
H
I
J
K
L
M
N
O
P
Q
R

Mon. at
Mon. at
Mon. at
Mon. at
Mon. at
Mon. at
Mon. at
Tues. at
Tues. at
Tues. at
Tues. at
Tues. at
Tues. at
Tues. at
Special
Special
Special
Special

8
9
10
11
1
2
3
8
9
10
11
1
2
3

Mon.,
Fri.,
Wed.,
Mon.,
Tues.,
Mon.,
Tues.,
Mon.,
Tues.,
Wed.,
Tues.,
Wed.,
Fri.,
Thurs.,
Sat.,
Sat.,
Sat.,
Thurs.,

Feb.
Feb.
Feb.
Jan.
Feb.
Jan.
Feb.
Feb.
Feb.
Feb.
Feb.
Feb.
Feb.
Feb.
Feb.
Feb.
Jan.
Feb.

7,
4'
2,
31,
8,
31,
8,
7,
1,
2,
1,
9,
4,
3,
5,
5,
29,
3,

9-12
9-12
9-12
9-12
2- 5
2- 5
9-12
2- 5
2- 5
2- 5
9-12
9-12
2- 5
9,12
9-12
2- 5
2- 5
2- 5

Wed.,
Mon.,
Tues.,
Mon.,
Mon.,
Sat.,
Thurs.,
Mon.,
Tues.,
Thurs.,
Fri.,
Tues.,
Fri.,
Sat.,
Wed.,
Sat.,
Tues.,
Sat.,

June
June
June
June
June
June
June
June
June
June
June
June
June
June
June
June
June
June

8,
6,
7,
6,
13,
4,
9,
13,
7,
9,
10,
14,
10,
11,
8,
11,
14,
4,

9-12
2- 5
9-12
9-12
9-12
9-12
9-12
2- 5
2- 5
2- 5
2- 5
9-12
9-12
2- 5
2- 5
9-12
2- 5
2- 5

Any deviation from the above schedule may be made only by mutual agree-
ment between students and instructor and with the approval of the Examina-
tion Schedule Committee.
N.B. Within the past year, the time of exercise for several of the courses
listed in the Literary Announcement has been changed, but due to an over-
sight no corresponding change was made in the Examination Group Letter.
In order to avoid conflicts in such cases, the time of exercise-rather than the
Examination Group Letter-must be employed in determining the time of
examination.

TUESDAY, JAN. 24, 1937
VOL. XLVIIL No. 89
Smoking in University Buildings:
Attention is called to the general rule
that smoking is prohibited in Uni-
versity buildings except in private of-
fices and assigned smoking rooms
where precautions can be taken and
control exercised. This is neither a
mere arbitrary regulation nor an at-
tempt to meddle with anyone's per-
sonal habits. It is established and
enforced solely with the purpose of
preventing fires.In the last five years,
15 of the total of 50 fires reported, or
30 per cent, were caused by cigarettes
or lighted matches. To be effective,
the rule must necessarily apply to
bringing lighted tobacco into or
through University buildings and to
the lighting of cigars, cigarettes, and
pipes within buildings-including

1025 A.H., Willey, Philippson, Su-
dermann, Braun, Van Duren.
1035 A.H., Scholl.
German 2.
C. Haven Hall. All sections.
German 31.
25 A.H., Gaiss, Diamond, Graf,
Van Duren.
231 A.H., Willey, Reichart, Philipp-
son.
1035 A.H., Scholl.
301 U.H., Wahr.
201 U.H., Hildner.
German 32.
203 U.H., Nordmeyer.
306 U.H.. Eaton.
Mathematics, College of Literature,
Science, and the Arts: The examina-
tions in Mathematics 1, 2, 3, 4, and 7
will be held Saturday, Feb. 5, 2-5 p.m.,
according to the following schedule:
Anning, 2003 A.H.

League 0f Nations . . .
Seems Beleaguered.. .
T HOUGH AT ONE TIME the League
of Nations was'hailed as the panacea
for all world ills, economic and political, it now
seems destined for that limbo which many pre-
dicted for it at its origin.
The so-called prophets really do not deserve
much credit at that. It does not take an Aristide
Briand or a Lloyd George or a Woodrow Wilson
to realize that it would be just a bit difficult for
a body to regulate world peace if that body's
only power was the dependency on partial, in-
terested powers to chastise miscreant nations.
The League has an interesting parallel in
American history, which did not last as long as
the League did, though we expect the latter to
follow it rather soon into oblivion. That paral-
lel was the anaemic Congress under the Articles
of Confederation which was supposed to have
held the original thirteen states together and
have guided them in the troubled diplomatic
waters of the late eighteenth century.
This confederation was expected to compete
with the well-balanced and singular foreign,
political and economic policies of older na-
tions when its Congress had no authority to tax
or regulate the commerce of the various states.
Like the League, it could only make requisitions
and then hold its breath, hoping that the prayer
would be answered.
It only took the United States of the eighteenth
century eight years to decide the obvious im-
possibility of the confederation set-up. Changes
were found to be necessary for our country to
continue its existence and these changes were
luckily forthcoming or the history of the Western
Hemisphere might be altogether different. It
was found that the central government had to
have powers to coerce its members or else that
central body would soon disintegrate. The neces-
sary powers were given up by the states, which
surrendered a great deal of their sovereignty.
And thus the League has reached the point,
when it is convoked for its hundredth session on
January 26, where it must receive a life draft
of wholesome red corpuscles represented by an
authority allowing it to enforce its measures
adopted against aggressor states if it is to con-
tinue.
While the League has been moribund ever since
its birth. the process of disintegration began in
earnest when it failed to stop Japan's stealing
of Manchuria in 1931 and Italy's of Ethiopia in
195 TtIv and (rmannv nrohablv considering the

Final Examination Schedule, First Semester, 1937-38: College of Litera-
ture, Science, and the Arts, Graduate School, School of Education, School of
Forestry..

By WRAG
Two heads are as good as one--except on the
top of a small beer.
* e
The best faux pas of the week was pulled by
an English professor who was discussing one of
Keats' love poems in class when he came to the
word "lone." He asked around the group for a
definition of the word as used in the text. Miss
Soanso said, "It means a girdle of flowers." Next
came Mr. Blankety who said, "It means a belt of
flowers."
Then the prof. turned to the class as a
whole aiid asked, "Now, class-which do you
prcfer-Miss Soanso's 'girdle,' or Mr. Blan-
.kety's 'belt'?"
Max Hodge, the Garg artist and helper, is hav-
ing a lot of fun with Editor George Quick. Each
time Hodge has drawn a cover or anything else
for the Garg this year, he has put Marcia Con-
nell's name or initials somewhere in the draw-
ing. Quick threatened to dock his salary if it
happened again in the last issue. However, if you
look closely, you will find "M. Connell" in the
events of the year on Hodge's cover for last
issue.
A Kappa Delta judy is expecting a ring
from her Irish boyfriend soon. One of her
sisters said that the ring would most likely
have an artificial stone in it, because, "You
know how the Irish are-with their sham
rocks."
Talk of a new football coach still continues.
Michigan is making a mountain out of a mole-
skin.
As Others See*I
Forerunner Of Revolution?
The government of Octavian Goga at Buchar-
est, Fascist and extremist as it is in many ways,
may in the end prove to have been merely the
stepping stone for a far more radical Fascist
government should the present drift toward Cod-
reanu and his Iron Guard continue. The position
of the present government in Rumania is in some
ways like that of the Papen government in Ger-
many in 1932, with King Carol occupying the
place of Hindenburg. Carol will hardly be able
to let his prime minister go to the lengths which
Codreanu advocates, but without following a
complete program of Fascism there is little
chance of winning many of Codreanu's support-
ers away from him. On the other hand, it would

such lighting just previous to goingI
outdoors. Within the last few years
a serious fire was started at the exit
from the Pharmacology building by
the throwing of a still lighted match
into refuse waiting removal at the
doorway. If the rule is to be enforced
at all its enforcement must begin at
the building entrance. Further, it
is impossible that the rule should be
enforced with one class of persons if
another class of persons disregards it.
It is a disagreeable and thankless
task to "enforce" almost any rule.
This rule against the use of tobacco
within buildings is perhaps the most
thankless and difficult of all, unless
it has the winning support of every-
one concerned. An appeal is made to
all persons using the University build-
ings-staff members, students and
others-to contribute individual co-
operation to this effort to protect
University buildings against fires.
This statement is inserted at the
request of the Conference of Deans.
Shirley W. Smith.
Notice to Sophomores: Second-
semester Sophomores who are plan-
ning on concentrating in English
should elect English 33 instead of
English 32 in the second semester of
this year. Revised schedules for this
course may be found in the Regis-
trar's Office, in the Office of the
Sophomore Counselors, and in the
English Office. I will be glad to con-
fer with students who wish to make
inquiries concerning English 33.
Karl Litzenberg
English I and II Final'Examination
Schedule, Tuesday, Feb. 1, 2 p.m.
English L
Ackerman 2003 A.H.
Allen, 215 A.H.
Baum, 225 A.H.
Bertram, 2014 A.H.
Calver, 4003 A.H.
Cassidy, 215 A.H.
Cowden, 3227 A.H.
Dean, 4203 A.H.
Ellinger, 203 U.H.
Everett, 3231 A.H.
Foro, 2203 A.H.
Giovannini, 103 R.L.
Green, 1209 A.H.
Greenhut, 35 A.H.
Haines, W. Phys.
Hanna, 208 U.H.
Hart, 201 U.H.
Hathaway, 302 M.H.
Helm, 1025 A.H.
Knode, 229 A.H.
English II.
Roellinger, 2054 N.S.
Stevens, 18 A.H.
Nelson, 4208 A.H.
Knott, 1025 A.H.
Leedy, W. Phys.
Ogden, 1025 A.H.
Peterson 2215 A.H.
O'Neill, 103 R.L.1
Peake, 205 S.W.1
Schenk, 4003 A.H.
Stibbs, 2235 A.H.
Stocking, 301 U.H.
Taylor. W. Phys.

Bradshaw, 231 A.H.
Coe, 5 A.H.
Copeland, 1035 A.H.
Dwyer,2203 A.H.
Elder, 1035 A.H.
Fitzpatrick, 2231 A.H.
Karpinski, 231 A.H.
Miller, D., 2003 A.H.
Myers, 2225 A.H.
Nyswander, 35 A.H.
Raiford, 231 A.H.
Vance, 2231 A.H.
Conflicts in Final Examinatidns,
College of Engineering: Attention is
called to the fact that all conflicts in
this College are td be reported to me
today. Instructions for reporting
conflicts are posted on the Bulletin
Board adjacent to my office.
J. C. Brier.
First Mortgage Loans. The Univer.
sity has a limited amount of funds
to loan-on modern well-located Ann
Arbor residential property. Interest
at current rates. Apply Investment
Office, Room 100, South Wing,
University Hall.
The Bureau has received notice of
several graduate fellowships and
scholarships open for the session of
1938-39 at Syracuse University in:
Liberal Arts College
Public Administration
Political Science
Social Psychology
Education
Advisers and Deans of Girls
For further information call at the
office, 201 Mason Hall.
University Bureau of Appointments
and Occupational Information
Extra-Curricular Activities: The
attentionof all students interested in
extra-curricular activities is called to
the change in procedure recently
adopted by the Committee on Stu-
dent Affairs with reference to the
method to be followed by the indi-
vidual desiring to take part in extra-
curricular activities and by the chair-
man and managers of these activities.
At the beginning of each semester
and summer session every students
shall be conclusively presumed to be
ineligible for any public activity until
his eligibility is affirmatively estab-
lished (a) by obtaining from the
Chairman of the Committee on Stu-
dent Affairs, in the Office of the Dean
of Students, a written Certificate of
Eligibility and (b) by presenting the
Certificate of Eligibility to the chair-
man of manager of the student activ-
ity in which he wishes to participate.
The Chairman or Manager of any
student activity shall file with the
Chairman of the Committee on Stu-
dent Affairs, before permitting the
student or students involved to par-
ticipate, the names of all those who
have presented Certificates of Eligi-
bility, and a signed agreement to ex-
elude all others from participation.
The issuing of Certificates of Eli-
gibility for the second semester will

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