100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

September 29, 1937 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1937-09-29

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

PAGE TWO THE MICHIGAN DAILY W"DNLS

'DRAY, SEFTUTIUIYA8R '(119, IU;57

Student Work Football 'Skull-Practice' Fi
To Be Shown -
Tn Art Q nl n'rprto0fBa

By EARL R. GILMANC
While Coaches Harry Kipke and
"Hunk" Anderson and their host of

Q- -

Directs Band

Canvases Depicting Ann assistants are wondering where the
most advantageous positions are for
Arbor Scenes merely 11 men, Prof. William D. Re-
velli and Major Walter B. Farriss
Two exhibits of work done by are facing the problem of moving
Summer Session students will be on 125 members of the Michigan Varsity
display this week in the first and sec-! Band through such novel formations
ond' floor corridors of the Architec- as Michigan football fans saw last
ture Building year.
Selections of painting work done in! The band does not meet just be-
fore the football game and receive
the outdoor painting course of Prof. instructions on what it is to do that
Alexander Valerio are in the first afternoon and then go out and do
floor display cases. Pieces included them, according to Major Farriss.
in the exhibit represent mainly Ann. The problem is much more compli-
Arbor scenes around the Huron River cated than that, so complicated that
Main Street, the railroad districts, usually two teeks of practice have
and paintings of old houses. Several to be put in to produce the smooth-
works have been done by Barbara! f owin; performance that football
Dorr, Grad, Ruth Hammond, Grad. fans are accustomed to seeing on
Lillian Politzer, Grad, Fred E. James, Saturday afternoon, he pointed out.
Grad, and J. S. Van Keuren, Grad. Usually, Major Farriss said, on
Architectural designs for a Thursday evening, two weeks before
sanitarium project are on dplarge the particular program is scheduled,
the second floor corridor. These
were done by the design classes of G "amr And S
Professors George Brigham and Clam ourAnd So
Ralph Hammett. The main lay-out
of the grounds as first designed and Popularity In
then different buildings assigned to
members of the class. These include,
designs and models of each building. By VIRGINIA VOORHEES
A large model of the University Your first fraternity party, or your
completed last spring in the architec- fifteenth, you'll want to look your
tural school will also be on the ground ravishing best. This season presents
floor for the first part of the fall. you with a variety of styles from

and marchingt x tther on Thursday Hl th ub rte
a s Pceand Friday on Fe. 'ry Field, the showAuh rte
nds Place T Hao Auhiis
goes on Saturday. To Watch Paralysis
At the present moment. Major Far-i
o r ations riss and Professor Revelli have all A close check on classmates of
the formations ready for the Michi- six-year-old Esther Hawkins of An-
- - ---- --- - -- gan State and the Northwestern!
games. An interesting feature of gell School, who shows signs of be-
there is a committee-meeting of 20 the State game will be theuse of ing Ann Arbor's second case of in-
members of the band. This group three drum majors instead of just fantile paralysis was being kept today
listens to the ideas that have been one. This is being done to enable by health and school authorities to
propounded and agrees on just what the entire band, probably the largest insure detection of further symptoms
formations are to be adopted. ever to represent the University of of the disease.
Each' man in the band is given a Michigan, to see all signals. Physicians who held a conference
umerto acilit the pigen o This is the third year that Profes- on the situation reported that the
the various members. However, be- sor Revelli has been connected with apearance o hese two cases should
fore the actual placing of the men, the band and the second year for ns ause ude alarm. d eseas on
all the formations are carried out by Major Farriss. Director Revelli is isal ters th disease u hl
of 25 oylea sldirs assisted by Lee Chrisman. '38SM, disappears with cold weather, the
means of 125 toy lead soldiers on a ' doctors said.
built-to-scale field. Then, from a and Major Farriss is assisted by Don
distance of 10 feet, a perspective is Perry, Grad.., alter Wheeler, '39,
taken to see how the formation will' and Don Rider. '39.
look and how feasible it is.
.Mimeographed copies of the ma- Assembly Hour Changed j Now Playiig !
neuvers are distributed atbband re- For Freshman Engineers
hearsal on Monday night before~ the!
game on Saturday. The men are Assembly for freshman engineers
then put through the formations which traditionally has been held at
without music on Monday, Tuesday 11 a.m. Wednesday of each week for
and Wednesday. more than 25 years has been shifted
In the meantime, Professor Revelli to 4 p.m. Wednesday, Prof. A. D.
times each maneuver and then fits in Mclore. head mentor for the engineer-
the music. After practicing music ing college announced yesterday.

Kipke To Conment On
Pictures Of State G"ame
Coach Harry G. Kipke will com-
ment on motion picturps of the Mich-
igan-Michigan State game to be
shown at the weekly meeting of the
University of Michigan Club of Ann
Arbor, meeting Tuesday, Oct. 5 in the
Union.
These football clinics, according to
Robert O. Morgan, secretary of the
alumni executive council, with some
member of the coaching staff as cc-
mentatore will be a feature of the
weekly meetings this fall.
Read Daily Classified Ads

phistication Gain
Formal Apparel
a belt of shirring, bespeaking the

5lj

NOW SHOWING

r
r
s
i

which to choose.
Last minute decrees tell us that
this is the yea rto attain as much
glamour and sophistication as your
age and type permit. The Directoire
period has inspired much of this, giv-
ing us the high, molded bodice from,
which falls a fluid skirt cut to cling
to the still figure and to swirl in the
dance. This type, made up in white
crepe or gold lame, would be stun-
ning on the taller, more lithe, and
more daring of you.
Black tulle, its full skirt splashed
with glittering sequins, seems to sa-
vor of . the exotic Far East-which
will appeal to the older men, without
a doubt, and we can give the fresh-
* men youths a little time to think it
over.
Egyptian Influences
Gowns which clothe the figure,
tightly from neck to hem, producingI
1 that long, slim, "poured-in" look, are
also much in evidence. Some of these
- have long floating panels down the
front, usually caught at the waist by

Egyptian influence. Velvets and
crepes are popular for these crea-
tions.
The long fitted basque with a full
skirt swirling out from shirring at
the low hip-line presents another
new evening silhouette. One coutur-
ier has designed such a model in
rayon and silk velvet. It features
puffed sleeves which have white lat-
tice. cuffs to match the tiny round
collar.
Rich Embroideries
However, if you are not the type
to carry off such sheath-like lines,
you may don a formal with a bouf-
fant skirt which swishes out from the
waistline and be just as definitely in
the swing of things. Some of these 1
skirts are shorter in front, sweeping
to a longer length in back, and decol-
letes are low, sleeves, enormous. Just
such a dress is pictured in a leading1
fashion magazine in a charming vel-
I vet and lace combination.
It is interesting, too, to note that
rich embroideries decorate a good
many models in imitation of the af-
fluence of the very early 1900's.

I

"Rhythm Roundup" "Going Native"
XT4I-.

Brevity
PARAMOUNT NEWS
Matinees - 2:00, 3:50.......25c
Nights - 7:00, 9:00.........35c

NttveltY

'WESTERN GRANDEUR"
SUNDAY
"SOULS AT SEA"

CORONATION
IN
COLOR

CARTOON
COLOR
CLASSIC

"LIFE OF GHENGIS
KHAN"
LATEST NEWS

Ip

P

U

i
'

r'

HORAL

NION

ONCERTS

FIFTY-NINTH ANNUAL SERIES 1937-1938

2.
2.

Rachmaninoff, Pianist
The Cleveland Orchesti
ARTUR RODZINSKI, Conductor

WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 27
r'a
TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 9
FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 19
MONDAY, NOVEMBER 29

3.
4.
5.
6.
7.

Richard Crooks,
Fritz Kreisler, V

Tenor
iolinist

Boston Symphony Orchestra
SERGE KOUSSEVITZKY, Conductor WEDNESDAY, D
Ruth Slenczynski, Pianist
MONDAY, J
Helsinki University Chorus

ECEMBER 8
ANUARY 10
NUARY 18
ANUARY 28
RUARY 17

-Rachmaninoff

I

MARTTI TURUNEN, Conductor

8.
9.

Gina Cigna, Soprano
The Roth Quartet
rmvaf%rnMIc 1ncr%

TUESDAY, JA
FRIDAY, JA
THURSDAY, FEB

I ,it '

11 A 1

IN

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan