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December 11, 1937 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1937-12-11

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

IV.

C. 11,1937

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Weakened Sextet Meets Brantford A. C. At Coliseum T

onigh

Injuries Might
Prevent Four
FromStarting
Sick List Includes Doran,
Fabello, Hillberg, James;
Game Starts At 8:30
By BEN MOORSTEIN
Brantford A.C. blows into town
this evening boasting one of its most
powerful hockey teams in several sea-
sons and Michigan meets the Cana-
dians on the Coliseum ice at 8:30
p.m. with a sextet weakened in at
least four places. Only one bright
spot, and that only tentative, shines
amid all the clouds.
The word "if," and it's a big one,
figures prominently in all the cases.
If Everett Doran, second line cen-
ter who suffered a broken meta-
carpal in his left hand against Lon-
don A.C. last Saturday, feels that
the mitt is O.K. he will see action,
even though it won't be very much.
The possibility is remote since the
break is still bothering him consider-
ably. It's more than likely that he
will not even dress.
Tonsilitis Bothers James
If Spike James, who acted a star-
ring role in both of Michigan's earl-
ier games, doesn't get over a slight
touch of tonsilitis that he contracted
early yesterday morning, then he
might not play. Even so he won't be
up to par for tonight's melee. Spike
was not at practice last night having
been told to rest at home until game
time. Unless the illness takes a sud-
den turn for worse, however, he will
definitely start.
If Johnny Fabello, the Varsity
fight winger, doesn't get completely
off the hospital list, he to won't be
at his best. During the week he
caught .a cold but it has virtually
disappeared and from the way he
looked in last night's drill he should
be ready to go at top speed.
If Les Hillberg also fails to get
off the sick list too then he won't
play the center position on the sec-
ond line that he was slated for by
Coach Eddie Lowrey. Hillberg con-
tracted a cold earlier in the week but
has been keeping inside in order to
overcome it. He did not show up for
practice yesterday either. Hillberg,
if he is able to play, and if Doran
does not, will be the center on the
alternate line.
Chase May Mind Nets
If a broken nose doesn't prove too
bothersome for Bill Chase, substitute
goalie, and if James' tonsilitis gets
the better of him, Chase will take
over the net, minding .duties. In
Thursday's practice Chase caught a
flying puck on the nose, breaking
it.
Excluding these five, out of the
squad's 11 men, the team is in excel-
lent physical shape. The workout
yesterday seemed to click and the
squad showed considerable enthusi-
asm and pepper.
The Probable Line-Up:
Michigan pos. Brantford
E. James......... G ....... Murphy
Smith ..........D. ...........Torti
Simpson .......'.. D ......Baumgart
Allen ..........C. . ...........Grieg
Fabello .......... W ...... Webster
G. James........ W ....... Krieger
Alternates: Michigan: Hillberg,
Chase, Chadwick, Doran; Brantford:
Rimmer, Cooper, Cinnamon, Storey,
Kelley, Edmundson.
Varsity Opens
Against State
Five Tonight

Wolverines Are Heralded
As Most Promising Squad
Since Days Of 1929
(Continued from Page 1)
the Michigan system are meaning-
less.
State on the other hand will use a
fast breaking set-up, with all men
dashing down floor as soon as the ball
comes into their possession. They
pass with abandon, seeking to break
one of their front men under the
basket for a set-up shot.
Townsend and Rae are the big'
Michigan scoring threats due to their
position in the front ranks. The Mich-
igan captain-passer, ball handier,
and crack shot par excellence-is the
hub of the entire Wolverine attack.'
Rae is the surprise in the lineup.
Of unknown quality at the outset of
the season, he has surged to the
foreground and is today highly re-
garded by his teammates. He
passes deftly, is a fine ball handler,
and with Townsend serving as a
steadying influence should be a dan-
gerous man.
The back line combines dribbling
dexterity, speed, and expert ball
handling. Thomas is the speed mer-
chant and will be on the receiving

CAPPON

-Courtesy Ann Arbor News.
OOSTERBAAN
* * * *

--Courtesy Ann Arbor News.
WEBER
4. 4. 4

-Courtesy Ann Arbor News.
ANDERSON

Their Coaching Posts Remain Uncertain

By ROY HEATH
When the ax which caught Harry
Kipke so neatly across the neck de-
.scended Thursday, it sailed past his
assistants. Whether it spared them
for future prunings by Kipke's suc-
cessor or to- be grafted back onto
the Michigan coaching staff is un-
certain.
It is generally agreed that assistant
football coaches Anderson, Weber,
Oosterbaan, and Cappon were left
hanging in exceedingly thin air in
light of the statement which in-
formed the world that Kipke was out.
To the questions of 'Where and
When, Kipke at least has a reverse
English answer. He knows what he
won't do. He won't coach anymore

football at Michigan. His staff isn't
so sure.
In the most ambiguous spot at this
stage is stocky backfield Coach
Wally Weber. The other members
of the assistant staff have coaching
assignments in other sports or out-
side interests. Not so with Wally.
Weber's Job Solely Football
Weber's job is solely football,
coaching, touring the lettuce league,
and keeping backward footballers
eligible, a job at which he is adept.
Consequently any shake up in the
grid coaching staff is bound to ef-
fect Weber. How it will effect him
is as yet uncertain.
"Hunk" Anderson, onetime Notre
Dame and North Carolina State
head coach, is also uncertain which

way circumstances will force him to
jump. His situation is ramified by
several factors.
Imported last season to aid in stav-
ing off Kipke's final fall by revamp-
ing Wolverine line play, Anderson
was thought to have thrown in his
lot with Kipke. If Kipke went so
would "Hunk."
But "Hunk" is an old Notre Damer
and regarded as one of the soundestf
line technicians in the business.
Should the Board of Control import
another disciple of the Notre Dame
system, the probability of Anderson
sticking would increase.
Cappon Has Other Duties
Cappy Cappon's position as head
basketball coach and assistant Ath-
letic Director could be regarded as

fairly secure were it not for recuring
rumors 'and news articles appearing
in Detroit and Chicago papers which
paint him has the "villain" of the
staff.
The latest of these appeared in
Chicago' questioning Cappon's "loy-
alty" in no uncertain terms. Whether
these thrusts at Cappon will damage
him materially can only be conjec-
tured upon.
Bennie Oosterbaan, assistant foot-
ball, basketball, and baseball coach,
is regarded as having the most se-
cure berth. One of the greatest, if
not the greatest athlete Michigan
ever had, Bennie works three sports,
is not quite close enough to the top
to be in great danger of getting
picked off.

I

ASIDE LINES
By IRVIN LISAGOR

Eight-Men Are
On Preferred
jList' For Coach'

i i
I

Here Are The Probable
Starting Cage Line-ups

;-,I

Me, I'll Take It...
AND OUT OF THE VALLEY of
peace and obscurity rode the 600
-coaches. Even your innocent
ASIDELINER got a vote in some-
body's poll, and our answer is that
we could stand a lot of criticism and
abuse for $8,000 or so per annum.
- - -
This metropolitan furore is
unwarranted. But we bet Mickey
Cochrane is glad, and grateful to
Michigan authorities. Mgr. Mike
came home expecting the guillo-
tine of public resentment to
claim him because of the
Gee Walker dismissal. B u t
he found himself pushed onto
the third page. There's a differ-
ence, though, between the two
cases. Cochrane got himself a
pretty good pitcher in return
and Michigan got nothing . . .
except more unfavorable pub-
licity.
Newspapers got a big play in the
coaches' office yesterday. The 'boys
were gathered around. reading about
themselves, their status, their suc-
cessors, etc. In one paper Cappon
was mentioned as a possible Kipke
successor on the front sports page
and demoted on the third. Ooster-
baan was "hired" in one and fired in
another. These assistant coaches are
up in the air about the whole affair.J
As soon as Harry Bennett,
personnel manager at Ford's,
was quoted on the situation, it is
reported that Walter Chrysler
became highly resentful because
he wasn't asked to comment.I
Also, the rumor leaked out that if
Bennett was behind Kipke, John
L. Lewis and his whole CIO
would picket the Stadium next
fall if Kipke remained.
The classic reaction to l'affaire
under fire, and a fine defensive play-
er.
For State it's the two first' year
men, George Falkowski and Marty
Hutt, that the Varsity must watch.
Six footers, they're dangerous around
the basket and .both are good shots.
Hutt is the better floor man of the
two.
In the backline the Spartans have
Dargush, their steady veteran, and
two other experienced men of fair
calibre, Howie Kraft and Leo Calla-
han. The latter is the only man on
the team under six feet and rarely
breaks into the forecourt.

Kipke came from a football player,
who was shooting pool in the Union
when a breathless reporter rushed
up all agog over this momentous
news, and told him about the board's'
announcement. "Nuts," said the grid-
der, obviously nettled, "I missed that
nine ball!"
One lady called the Daily andj
said she thought either Presi-
dent Roosevelt had died or war
had been declared when she
heard newsboys shouting "ex-
tra." I was certainly disappoint-
ed," she added.
A Chicago paper carried a story$
that Ivan Williamson was appointed.
We called the Windy City, contacted
the man who wrote the story and the
conversation ran something like
this:
'Say, did you fellows run a
story that Ivan Williamson wasI
'virtually assured' of the Michi-
gan coaching job?"
"You said it, pal," came the
reply. "That's the yarn, pal."
"But is this reliable?"
"Listen, punk, we're authentic,
see! What's it smell like up
there?"
"You're not only authentic,
pal," we said, at the risk of over-
doing this "pal" business, "but
you're also exclusive. We've
heard nothing about it here."
"Sure, you haven't. Get off
your haunches. In another 48
hours, we'll have another yarn
that'll knock your hat off .".
Licked, we hung up.
Phone 3205
Groceries - Beer - Wine
Ty's Service Market
420 Miller Ave.

'Field Is Wide Open'
Yost; Non-Michigan
May Be Chosen

Says
Man

(Continued from Page i)
In the past, the coach has been re-
tained on a year-to-year basis.
The report that Howard Jones,
Southern California coach, is in line
for the position is also unfounded,
the Daily was authoritatively in-
formed. Another rumor had Capt.
Gar Davidson, retired Army coach, as
having been approached.
Status Of Assistants Undecided j
Board officers declined to comment
upon Charles E. (Gus) Dorais, the
University of Detroit's widely respect-
ed mentor who has been enthusias-
tically endorsed, especially by Detroit
COLLEGE BASKETBALL
Dartmouth 40, Springfield, Mass., 38
Pittsburgh 27, Northwestern 22.

MICHIGAN MICH. STATE
Townsend ....... F ..... Falkowski
Thomas ......... F ........... Hutt
Rae ............. C ....... Dargush
Beebe ..........G......Callahan
Fishman.......G.........Kraft
Referee: John Schommer, Chicago.
Umpire: Eddie Powers, Detroit.
alumni groups. Dorais denies knowl-
edge of any official effort to secure
him.
George Veenker, former assistant
coach here and present athletic di-
rector at Iowa State, is another ru-
nored choice, as is Jack Blott, former
line coach now at Connecticut Wes-
leyan.
Upon the status of the assistant
coaches, Yost remarked yesterday,
''They will have to be mutually sat-
isfactory to the new coach and the
administration." The new coach will,
of course, be free.to namie his own as-
sistants.
Questioned as to whether the ap-
pointment would be announced be-
fore Jan. 1, the veteran athletic di-
rector said, "It's not likely to, al-
though if we get our man and come to

Louisville 23, Butler 28. terms, it may."
Wayne 47, Kalamazoo 30. Harry Kipke, the ousted mentor,
Cornell 28, Iowa St. 26 (overtime). has not determined his future as yet.
Coe 31, Grinnell 38. 1 Coast rumors had him going to either
U. of Cincinnati 33; Wilmington 26. Southern California or Oregon.
Home- Home-
Made Made
C C
AA
N N
D
YY
Take a
Box Box
Home :Home
50c up 50c up
Our wine list includes a stock from A to Z in imported
and domestic wines. CALIFORNIA, FRENCH (Bur-
gundy), GERMAN (Rhine), GREEK (Mavrodaphne)
all have those qualities which make them better than
the average.
Piping hot, superbly served Grade-A Food, also gives
the SUGAR BOWL an enviable reputation. We feature:
CHICKEN and TURKEY DINNERS 75c
OUR PREMIUM STEAK DINNERS 65c to $1.50
Why not stop in some afternoon, and have a Snack?
A delicious sandwich -we have every kind imaginable,
and something to drink helps to build up your Vim,
Vigor and Vitality for these cold winter days.

* ,"."s 1 . ,,,
00
1
Chiristmas
Trees
Trees of All Sizes
fnr All Trhnses

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