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December 07, 1937 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1937-12-07

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

How Marquette Co-eds Pass Time

EVENING RADIO
PROGRAMS

It's higher education on the art of gum chewing for these Marquette
University co-eds as Dawn Bennett (center) passes the test of chewing
with the glass atop her head. Jean Savage (left) proffers the gum, as
Frances McGrath looks on.
Art Authorities Watch Progress
Of Michigan's Hall Of Fame

WWJ
P.M.
6:00-Tyson's Sports.
6:15-Dinner Music.
6 :30-Bradeast.
7:00-Amos 'n' Andy.
7 :15-"Voices."
7:45-Sport Review.
8 :00-Phillip Morris.
8:30-Lady Esther Serenade.
9 :00-Vox Pop.
9:30-Hollywood Mardi Gras.
10:30-Jimmy Fidler.'
11 :00-Newscast.
11:15-Webster Hall Music.
11:30-Dance Music.
12:00-Northwood Inn.
WJR
P.M.
6:00-Stevenson News.
6:15-Comedy Stars.
6:30-Glen Gray Orch.
6 :45-Songtime.
7:00-Poetic Melodies.
7:15-Hollywood Screen Scoops.
730-Helen Mencken.
8:00-Edward G Robinson.
8:30-Al Jolson-Martha Raye.
9:00-Al Pearce.
9:30-Jack Oakie College.
10:30-News Comes to Life.
11:00-Headline News.
11:15-Reminiscing.
11:45-Meditation.
12:00-Emery Deutsch Orch.
12:30-Ted Fio Rito Orch.
CKLW
P.M.
6:00-Day in Review.
6 :15-News and Sports.
6:30-Exciting Moments.
6:45-Rhythm Men.
7:00-Luigi Romanelli.
7:15-Rube Appleberry.
7:45-Crime Clinic.
8 :00-Optimist Club.
8:30-Happy Hal.
9:00-Paul Whiteman Orch
9:30-Jazz Nocturne.
10:00-Symphonic Strings.
10:30-Witch's Tate:
11:00-Canadian Club Reorter.
11:15-Melody Men.
11 30-Isham Jones Orch.
12:00-Horace Heidt Orch.
WXYZ
P.M.
6:00-Day in Review.
6: 1 5-Fact? inder.
6:30-Linger A While.
6 :45-Lowell Thomas.
7:00-Easy Aces.
7:15-Keen Tracer
7:30-Green Hornet.
.:00-Husbands and Wives
8:30-It Can Be Done.
9 :00-American Revue
9:30-NBC Night Club.
10 :00-Hugh Johnson.
10:15-Victor Arden.
10:30-Celia Gamba.
11:00-Tomorrow's Headlines.
11 :30-Jimmy Dorsey Orch_
12 :00-Graystone.
12:30-Long Thompson Orch.

Remer Warns
Of eneral War
From Far Eat
(Continued from Page 1)
and therefore no specific obligation
rests upon us as a result of signing
the League Covenant.
7. (But) The United States has an
accepted policy in foreign relations
which is based upon the collective
principle, the policy of .the Open
Door in China.
8. The present war in China has
been said by the United States and
by the parties t6 the Nine Power
Treaty to be in violation of that
treaty.
9. The Brussels Conference is eith-
er a failure or it is still the basis of
possible collective action to give ef-
fect to the Nine Power Treaty.
10. If the Brussels Conference has
failed, it means the failure of one of
the few remaining argreements based
on the collective principle, and the
abandonment of the collective prin-
ciple greatly increases the danger of

Remodeled

Repaired
Cleaned

E. L. Greenbaum

448 Spring Street

J

I

Sculptor Class Remnants
Stored On Third Floor
Of Old University Hall
By DUNCAN MAC KINTOSH
Michigan has a Hall of Fame! Al-
~though art authorities throughoutJ
the country have been watching its
growth attentively since it first camel
into existance eight years ago, few
university students are aware of its
presence on campus.
Those few students who havet
climbed the three flights of stairs of
old University Hall, have seen,
through the half light of the top-
most floor, a host of motionless fig-
ures and statues, tangible proof that
the study of sculpture at the'Univer-
sity of Michigan has transcended the
confines of the lecture courses to!
which it is limited in most universi-
'ties and has found true expression
in the creative ability of talented
students.
In 1928, the University decided to
allow students wishing to express
themselves in the fine arts special
opportunity to work on original prob-
lems. The same year, the Carnegie
Corporation interested itself in the
project and granted $100,000 to in-
itiate ithe program. To head the
work came Avard Fairbanks, of Ore-

war on a great scale in which theImade the basis of collective action,
United States may well be involved., the United States should make a new
I1 1f the Brussels Conference hns and more carefully prepared effort to
failed, ita y be fliA, is l a6ire ca Ifs ' ((~ o--] Nire Powor Treaty.
for the applicatiol of the i'itlralityt 13. To do nOt hlnWis to go back at
Act for the acceptance of the is,"a-"once and the same time on our own
tionist principle. Neurtality Act and on the Nine Pow-
12. If the Brussels Conference has er Treaty which embodies our tra-
not entirely failed and it may still be ditional policy in the Far East.

gon, as associate professor of sculp-
ture.
The classes began in 1929 and the
department was immediately be-
sieged with students . interested in
sculpture. The problem soon be-
came one of keeping the classes small
enough to preserve the necessary
close contact between pupil and
teacher, but the result of this careful
handpicking of students is shown in
the fact that of the numerous sta-
tues, busts and plaques on display in
the hall outside the University Hall
studios, many have been exhibited
at the Detroit Institute of Art and
other Michigan art centers. Many
have been in competition in New
York and photographs of some of
the pieces have appeared in The
American Magazine of Art.
Today, Professor Fairbanks said,
the influence of the project is just
beginning to be felt. Those students
who become teachers of sculpture in
Michigan high schools are now send-
ing their students to Michigan,
FISHOW'S WATCH
and
JEWELRY REPAIR
347 Maynard Cor. William
Watch Crystals 35c

rr
-Announcing-
jt; CHRISTMAS
VALUES.
Come in and see our
selection of Compacts
and Cosmetics.
RITZ
BEAUTY SHOP
605 William St.
F agg

Christmas Qifts of Quality
WATCH ES SILVERWARE
Hamiltons Tvowle . .. Gorham
Omegas . .. Elgins International
Girard-Perregaux Wallace
GENUINE ORANGE BLOSSOM RINGS
ei2erchandise of Good Value and Fine Quality
JEWELERS and SILVERSMITHS
208 South Main Street

which, in turn, increases1
tition for entering the
courses.

the compe-
beginning

*

- it

BAD HATL
A new story
of adventure in
Trinidad '9
Only hunger, gnaw-
ing and insistent, j
could stir Bad Hat. A gun would
bring money, and food. He hadn't
figured what happens when the gun
you reach for hangs from the hip of
a naval M. P.
by WILLIAM C. WHITE
AT
3000!
It was 2:37 a. m.
when the airport
called Luce
Wendell. Ice was forming on the in-
coming transport, and they needed
another plane to test the weather
below them. All Luce had to do was
to go up, find out how bad it was-
and get back. A short story
by LELAND JAMIESON
Around the Clock with a
RENO DIVORCEE
What do they do to kill time in
Reno? You'll find the answer in Day
of a Divorcee, illustrated with twelve
natural-cokdr photographs, taken es-
pecially for The Saturday Evening
Post by Ivan Dmitri.
Will an Indiana man be the
NEXT PRESIDENT?
Who's the No. 1 threat for 1940? Why
is Roosevelt keeping an eye on him?
Here's a lively account of White
House prospects in a state where
anything can happen politically.
Ijies on the Wabash
by PAUL R. LEACH
A New Novel by
CLARENCE BUDINGTON
KELLAND
author of STAND-IN
Meet the marriage-fleeing Mr.
Bunbury Parsloe, who found a girl
stowaway and $25,000 in his trailer.
That's the start of Fugitive Father,
a new Kelland romance well seasoned
with mystery! Second part of six.
AND ... more stories and articles,
plus serials, editorials, fun and car-
toons. All in the Post on vour news

is

t

A coonskin coat, we've heard it said,
Wards of chill winds from heel to head;
In which respect its chief vocation's
Much like No Draft Ventilation's.
MASURE
ks take such things as No Draft Ventila-
tion as a matter of course now that all GM
cars have this improvement. But when you
add Knee-Action, the Unisteel Body, the
Turret Top, improved Hydraulic Brakes and
a steady parade of betterments-you see how
a great organization moves ahead-using its
resources for the benefit of the public -
: ,,- ,n t .. in .-.-, :. n -o: 4 " ,;nn 4 . riI

by DR. ROBERT M. HUTCHI-NS

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