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September 21, 1937 - Image 32

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1937-09-21

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE

MT Tr

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.

.xterior W ork
Of G raduate
Sehoo Finished

Horace H. Rackham Graduate School As It Will Appear When Completed

George Pray Tells er and librarian of the A.N. Socie
At the meeting of the society Fi
01 Early Students was elected president in place of C<
lins, Welch, vice-president in pla
(Continued from Page 29) of Pray, Clark. scribe in place
_ .....Hoffman, Hall, treasurer in place4

Interior Work Is Expec
To End During First P
Of This Semester
Progress in the construction of
Aackham School for Graduate S
ies during the summer has resu
in the completion of the work on
exterior of the building, while the
tenor is expected to be finished e
this semester.
The million - and - a - half- d

tedh
'art
the

for her home on a visit during MissI
Clark's vacation. I bade her an af-
fectionate good-bye and when I didl
so I bade fareweil to everything that
is dear to me on earth. I was sad
and lonely today. I did not study
any. In the forenoon we rehearsed
our pieces in the library. In the af-4
ternoon I was down to the printing
office nearly all the afternoon., After
tea I made out my reports as treasur-

Pray, Pray reelected librarian and
Rawls reelected editor.
August 14th. This was a great day
in our lives. Tie time passed heavily
and slowly away; nothing was said
or hardly thought of but the exhibi-
tion. Nearly all the day was spent in
rehearsing and preparing for it. Eve-
ning came and the people began to
pour into the church long before
dark and soon it was filled to over-
(Continued on Page 31)

tud-
iltedI
the;
in-
arly
ollar

~Continued on Page 31)

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three-story structure, is a memorial
to the late Horace H. and Mary A
Rackham, wealthy Detroit philan-
thropists whose estate made the do-
nation for the building.
No classes will be held in the school,
whose chief purpose, according to
Dean Clarence S. Yoakum, will be to
provide facilities for morethan 30 re-
search organizations on campus and
to state and national scientific and
learned societies.
Materially, the building will be one
of the finest and most permanent of
the University. Its facing of a cer-
tain type of Indiana limestone, never
used here before except for aon
ment, will render itunique on the
campus. It will probably be the last
building of its type erected, since the
famous Dark Hollow quarry, source
of the limestone facing, is now ex-
hausted.

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Baird Carillon To Boom First

Greeting To A Freshman Class

A gigantic amphitheatre seating 1,-
100 people, about half the number or-
dinarily accommodated in similar
space, will occupy the entire north
side of the structure, from the first
floor to the second floor mezzanine.
The leading contribution the new
school isexpected to make to the
cultural side of the University will be
in the form of providing a place for
establishing inter-academic relation-
ships, Dean Yoakum has said. Boun-
daries between subjects will be less
sharply distinguished than is usually
found necessary in regular class-
rooms.

Year By Year

Third Largest Instrument pleasing. On the other hand, if the
listener is too far away, the rapidly
STo B ear dissolvingsound of the small bells
Of This School Year will be lost and only the "boom" o1
the larger bells will be heard. The
The Baird Carillon, housed in the listening post should also be chosen
Burton Memorial Tower and played where both high and low notes can
by Prof. Wilmot Pratt of the music be heard.
school, will this year boom forth its The public can probably best hear
first greeting to a freshman class, the carillon on ithe lawn of the Mich-
Concerts on the bells, making up the igan League or in Felch Park, about
third largest carillon in the world, a block each from the League.
will be a regular feature of the school
year. ~I
Donated by Charles A. Baird, '95L, U Fresh Air
prominent alumnus of Kansas City,
Mo., the carillonhconsists of 53 bells, Camserv g
weighing more than 125,00 pounds, Can pJ e v n
in chromatic sequence. The largest
(Bourdon) bell weighs slightly mole 3ta1Asnhs epco
than 12 tons and has the pitch of 50 An/a l
E flat below middle C. The smallest The 17th season of the University
bell weighs 12 pounds and sounds the Fresh Air Camp came to a close late
note of G sharp four and one-half oc- in As and 320 bo aclly
taves above the Bourdon.August,and 320 boys financially
The Burton Memorial Tower built underprivileged and socially under-
TheButonMeorii l'oer bultnourished, spent four weeks in
by subscriptions of Ann Arbor citi- the 200-acre camp on Patterson
bens and alumni of the University, Lake in such activities as swimming,
houses the carillon in a chamber on hiking, nature study, and handcraft.
the 10th floor, 120rfeet from the More than 6,000 boys from the
ground. The bells are hung rigidly oret fDotha ,000nbofrom the-
on a steel frame more than 30 feet streets of Detroit, Ann Arbor, Wyan-
in height and 18 by 26 feet at the dotte and Hamtramck have enjoyed
base, the camp during its existence. This
According to many experts, the year the total number was divided
Charles Baird Carillon represents an mto two distinct periods of one
advance over previous installations, month each.
and each bell has been tuned ac- Counselors of the camp are Univer-
curately, unlike in the old days when sity students or graduates, who teach
it was mere accident when the tones the boys swimming, book-binding,
of similar bells were full, mellow and weaving, among other things. The
rich, most important function of the camp
There is a great deal of discussion is teaching "fair play," according to
concerning where is the best place to its director, George G. Alden.
hear the carillon. When it was first More than 1,500 boys have learned
in the process of construction, many Funds for support of the Fresh Air
thought it could be heard from great Fnsfrspoto h rs i
distances. However, this is impos- project are obtained from subscrip-
sible because the volume of the rigid- tions by townspeople, faculty mem-
ly hung carillon is considerably less hers, and other friends of the camp.
than that of swinging bells. Augmenting funds collected by solici-
The four largest bells are located tions, the Student Christian Associa-
in the first tier at each of the corners tion holds two Tag Days each year,

Students Find
Fun And Work{
At 'ihi ras'
Carnival Benefited Both
M~en's Dorm. Womien's 1

1
1
r
t

C
J
r
T
a
T
R
1

e
Y
s
f
e

Many Religious Groups
Plan Various Activities
Student groups of every possible re-
ligious denomination carry on exten-
sive activities throughout the school
year, with programs held weekly or
even more often, open to all freshman
students.

1.-.k 7 V aSunday nights are, the most popular
Swimming Pool Funds meeting times of these groups and
usually informal suppers are held
Inaugurated with the sole purpose first, with faculty lectures and stu-
of benefiting the women's swimming. dent discussion panels following with
pool and Men's Dormitory Funds, the topics of general interest to all stu-
1937 Michigras carnival furnished dents. Friday and Saturday night
much amusement and hard work for parties, picnics and hikes are among
Michigan students, the other activities sponsored by
The Michigras, which was the lar- these groups.
gest mass event at the University
since the Union Fair in 1924, was a USE OF X-RAY
real carnival with booths, side shows
and the customary carnval features X-rays, which produce ionization
including a ferris wheel, a crack-the- in the tissue, are being ,widely used
whip and other concessions. now but are not universally success-
Elaborate floats-mostly in a hu- ful.
morous vein-featured a huge parade
led by the mayor of Ann Arbor on
the opening night of the Michigras,
April 23. Bursting bombs heralded
the event.
More than 7,500 students and
townspeople attended the affair,
~which was held in Yost Field House. wVY here 1W ou l
The total proceeds of the two nights
was approximately $8,000. Would you have your eyes
The booths did a land office busi- glasses by a dentist? Or, y
ness as townsfolk and students alike a watch from a hardware st
flocked to the varied attractions. Del- No!tPersh ardwareut
ta Upsilon's "Hunt Club," in which No! Perish the thought!
the customers attempted to put out Where will you buy that
candle flames with rifle fire, and pen? From a drug clerk, o
Beta Theta Pi's "Follies Berserk" maker who is trained to fit
were among the most popular on the adjust the flow to the hand o
floor. The Independent Men's Club The answer is quite obvious.
ran a radio raffle booth. gWe are the ONLY pen-m
Head man of the Michigras was Arbor. For 15 years we have
Willis Tomlinson, '37. He got theY

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"Mommommommomm

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History Given
Of University

MAGAZINE
SUBSCRIPTIONS
AND
NEWSPAPERS
HOME DELIVERY -RETAIL
Let Us Arrange Your Renewals.
50 YEARS OF PERFECT SERVICE
We are the Publishers' Representatives
for All Magazines and Newspapers
STOFFLET NEWS Co.
208 South Fourth Phone 6911

' -Oa

Site Of Present Camp
Chosen In 1837; Fun
Borrowed From State
(Continued from Page 29)

us
ds

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f

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i
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i
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t
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t
is

d You Buy a Fountain Pen?

s examined for
would you buy
ore?
new fountain
r from a pen-
the point and
f the user?
nakers in Ann
served Michi-

gan students. We still serve many former
students in their home cities by mail.
Try us out! It will save you time, trouble
and disappointment. Our fitting service is
free!
RIDER'S
302 South State Street
"THE PEN HOSPITAL"
See ""Doc" Rider

Dr. Hutchins elected to Presidency of
the University.
1911- Feb. 11 - National dinner
held at Hotel Astor, New York City.
1912 - Seventy-fifth anniversary
of University celebrated at Com-
mencement time.
1913 - University Health Service
established. Graduate School estab-
lished as separate division of Univer-
sity, with Dr. Karl E. Guthe as Dean.
Hill Auditorium completed, the be-
quest of Regent Arthur Hill, '65E.
1916 - Natural Science Building
erected. Newberry and Martha Cook
dormitories completed. April 14-
President Angell died.
1919 - New University Library.
completed. New Michigan Union
clubhouse completed.
1920 - June 30-President Hutch-
ins resigns. July 1 - Marion Leroy
Burton became President of Univer-
sity. Betsy Barbour dormitory com-
pleted. October 14-Dr. Burton of-
ficially inaugurated as President with,
three day educational conference. t
1921-Mill tax increased to three-
fifths of a mill, to yield annually $3,-
000,000. Legislature also appropriat-
ed $4,800,000 for building. School of
education established with Prof. A.
S. Whitney as Dean.1
1922 - Engineering Laboratories
Building completed. William L. Clem-
ents Library of American History, the
gift of Regent Clements, '82, dedi-
cated.
1923 - Yost Field House on Ferry
Field completed, the first building of
its kind erected in any university.
1924 -University High School and
New Physics Building completed. An-
gell Mall, the first portion of a larger
building for the Literary College
erected. Department of Business Ad-
ministration established, with Ed-
mund E. Day as Dean.
1925-February 18-President Ma-
rion Leroy Burton died. November 2
-Clarence Cook Little formally in-
augurated as sixth President of the
University of Michigan. University
Hospital completed at cost of $3,800,-
000. Lawyers' Club, gift of Hon. W.
W. Cook, '80L, of New York, opened
(Continued on Page 31)

notion of having such a carnival fror
the "Fandango" of the University c
Chicago. It took him more than
year and a half to get the initial prep
arations consummated.
It is probable another Michigra
will be held this year as plans ar
no being made for-it.

of the frame, the Bourdon hanging in
the southwest.
In a church bell the clapper swings
from a central pivot in the head of
the bell and strikes either lip of the
bell with full force. In the carillon
1 bell the clapper is held in a position
very close to the point of impact and
is brought into contact with the bell
by the pressure of the carillonneur's
hand or foot on the keys or pedals of
the clavier which transmit this
"stroke" to the clapper by means of
wires. It is not possible or desirable
to create the volume of sound in a
carillon that can be created in a
church bell.
However, the listener to the caril-
lon should more or less determine
where he can hear the bell most sat-
isfactorily to him. In general, he can
not be too close to the bell, for then
the mechanical sounds and the "strike
tone" will be too prominent and un-

L.

HOME COOKED FOOD
Mrs. Hampton's Famous
SOUTHERN FRIED
CHICKEN
-served every Sunday 12:30 to 7:30
and Daily 5:30 to 7:30

GOOD FOOD FOR
EVERY MEAL

TRY OUR
DELICIOUS STEAKS

Mrs. Hampton's Tea Room

605 Forest

Phone 2-3836

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IF YOU WRITE,

WE HAVE IT!

Headquarters for Writing Materials,
Typewriters, and Fountain Pens

i

Offensively Healthy?
maybe, but
he's just bougoht the.
NINE MAMM1OTH ISSUES
of the
YewGarg-oyle'
for only $1.00
:Mlicig ad's Own" Comic hh azine
ib

;yam=
MH -
bR V,
O o
$ ( 1

New L. C. Smith
and Corona, Roy-
al, Remington,
Underwood porta-
les in all models.

Nationally Advertised Makes-
Wahl, Parker,
Sheaffer, Waterman

and{
Priced $1

others.
.00 and up.

Na
A Variet y of
Appetizing Foods
TO CHOOSE FROM
at
K u '2

r.

Reconditioned and Used Typewriters of all
makes bought sold, rented, exchanged, cleaned
and repaired. SPECIAL RENTAL RATES to
students. Ask about our easy Rental-Pur-
chase Plan; it will save you money.
Buy where you may compare all standard
makes in a complete range of prices.

A large and complete assortment.
Service work a specialty.
STUDENT and OFFICE SUPPLIES
LOOSE LEAF NOTEBOOKS
Correspondence Stationery

IM ILAl

F -U

I= 1

Fm

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