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June 04, 1938 - Image 1

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1938-06-04

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The Weather
Continued fair and some-
what warmer.

L1

S.itr igau

~Iaitjj

I - 11-

Editorials
Can. Legislation
Change Human Nature .

UYV WYTYT LT I ~

iT

JJ. muV11.N0. 179

AN'N ARBOR, MICHIGAN, SATURDAY, JUNE 4, 1938

PRICE Twit: tnrmTfif

- aJWAN M WA V i ' .5. m

5

Detroit Mayor
Forbids 'Clubs'
In Ultimatum
To CIO Unions
Claims Two-Inch Thick
Sticks Are Unnecessary
To Support Placards
City Hall Circuited
By 1,500 Pickets
DETROIT, June 3.-(R)-An ulti-
matum forbidding pickets in future
Detroit labor disputes to carry their
placards on two-inch-thick sticks was
served on the Committee for Indus-
trial Organization today by Mayor
Richard Reading._
The Mayor delivered his ultimatum'
to a CIO committee which visited him
at his office in City Hall. Approxi-
mately 1,500 pickets marched around
the building during the interview in
response to a CIO summons for a
rally to protest "police brutality" at
the Brass Plant riot.
Heavy Clubs Not Needed
"To claim that such heavy clubs
are needed to suppprt a flimsy little
picketing placard is ridiculous," May-
Dr Reading declared. "To, tack such a
placard on such a standard is like
tacking a miniature flag on a tele-
graph pole."
The Mayor also asserted that he
was "fed up" with being called an
anti-union mayor, that he once be-
longed to a union and that he al-
ways had been sympathetic with the
"reasonable objectives" of labor
unions.
In response to the request, Larry
S. Davidow, attorney for the United
Automobile Workers (CIO), asked the
Mayor to instruct the police not to
carry night sticks.
Council Reverses Its'elf
1nThe conference ,eween the Mayor
ansd thxe CI0 co Amittee occurred
after the City Council had taken un-
.der an advisement a CIO petition for
an investigation by a special com-
mittee of the Brass Plant riot. Read-
ig agreed to cooperate in an in-
quiry if, one shou d be. called.
In permitting a brief appearance
by the CI0 group today, the Council
reversed an action of last Wednes-
day when it denied a petition for a
hearing on "police brutality" and
demands for dismissal of Police Com-
missioner Heinrich Pickert.
Tracy M. Doll, chairman of the
Detroit CIO council, told the coun-
cilmen there was "nothing unreason-
able in asking that manufacturers
be denied police help when they' seek
to use the police to deny the right
"of collective bargaining and violate
the Wagner Labor Relations Act.
Dalton To Star
In New Show
'French Without 's'ears'
Is Fourth Of Scasoi
"French Without Tears," a mod
ern comedy by Terrence Rattigan and
starring Doris Dalton, the fourth play
of the 1938 Dramatic Season, will
open Tuesday at 8:30 p.m. in Lydia
Mendelssohn Theatre.
Miss Dalton has just been elevated
to stardom in New York this season
with Henry Fonda in "Blow Ye
Winds." She has been seen before
in Ann Arbor playing Ophelia 4to Ian

Keith's Hamlet, and in "Libel,"
"Party," and other Drama Season
plays. Miss Dalton has been on the
stage since her graduation from Wel-
lesley at which time she went right
into stock work. She has been seen
consistently on the,New York stage
for the last six years, probably the
best play being "Petticoat Fever"
which ran for six months, following]
which it was three months on the'
road and several weeks in Hollywood.
For the past two summer seasons
Miss Dalton has been the leading
woman at the Newport Casino The-
atre and this summer is to have the
season lead at the Lakewood theatre
in Skowhegan, Maine.
Supporting Miss Dalton will be Au-
guste Aramini, a well known French
comedian, with Parisienne theatre
training and experience at the Com-
edie Francaise, Nigel Blake and Cor-.
nel Wilde who are coming from New
York to take part in this production,
and Otto Hulett, Alan Hewitt, Bar-
bara Dirks, Hayden Rorke, Charles
LeMay and Joanna Roos who have
been seen in the previous offerings.

I __ -

I

1 lond CountessI

Schuschigg's
Wife By Proxy
L
VIENNA, June 3.-( P)-Kurt
Schuschnigg, former Chancellor of
Austria, whose fate at the hands of
his Nazi captors still is uncertain,
was married to beautiful Countess
Vera Fugger Von Babenhausen today
at a ceremony he could not even
attend.
Dr. Arthur Schuschnigg, his bro-
ther, took the place of the former
Chancellor as proxy at the wedding
in the private chapel of the Domin-
ican Church.
Schuschnigg, champion of Aus-
tria's lost independence and a foe of
Naziism, has been detained by the
Nazi authorities since Germany an-
nexed Austria March 13.
He disappeared May 28 from Bel-
vedere Castle, his home in detention,
but authorities have insisted he still
is "somewhere in Vienna."
His platinum blond bride is 34
years old and is considered one of
the most beautiful women of Vienna.
She was his daily companion at Bel-
vedere palace until his removal last
Saturday to an undisclosed place.
But today, it was believed, even
she did not know where- her husband
was being held. It was reported she
received a letter from the-bridegroom,
dated only Vienna, which said:
"By this time we should Abe man
and wife. This makes me extremely
happy. A thousand kisses. Kurt."
Ecuador Loses
ArmyCabinet
Officers Resign To Fill
Positions In Ranks
QUITO, Ecuador, June 3.-()-The
Ecuadorian Cabinet, composed of
army officers, resigned tonight in the
midst of an Ecuadorian-Peruvian
crisis because ministers said their
place now was in the ranks of the
army.
The resignation came a few hours
after the government dispatched to
Peru a protest over a frontier inci-
dent in which an Ecuadorian soldier
was reported killed and another
wounded in a clash with Peruvian
troops.
General G. Alberto Enriquez, Su-
preme Chief of the Republic, accepted
the resignations and announced hef
would try to form a new cabinet fromt
civilian ranks.
A foreign office communique said
the incident occurred Wednesday
near the frontier garrison of Roca-
fuerte, along the River Napo in an
area over which both nations claim
sovereignty.c
It charged that Peruvian gunboats
steaming on the river passed more1
than a mile beyond the border pro-..
visionally agreed upon pending de-
marcation of the frontier.
It said shots were heard and an of-
ficer and four soldiers were sent
from the Rocafuerte garrison to in-
vestigate, only to be fired upon by 40t
Peruvian soldiers who had landed in
territory where the garrison obtained4
fresh food supplies.

Relief BillFoes
Lose Decisive
Vote In Senate
F.D.R. Defeats Opponents'
Attempt To 'Earmark'
Spending-Lending Fund
Administration Acts
For FinalPassage
WASHINGTON, June 3.-(E)-
Senate critics of the Administration's
spending-lending bill played their
ace card today-and lost.
They failed, 29 to 43, to tie up
$325,000,000 of the measure in such
a way as to make sure that the
money would be used for specific
rivers and harbors and flood control
projects.
Administration supporters had
fought such "earmarking," dec aring
the President wanted and should
have a free hand to allot the money.
They said that in that way the Ad-
ministration could mobilize dollars
quickly in areas of most severe un-
employment.
Critics of the Administration re-
plied that Congress should keep more
control over appropriations, especial-
ly in view of charges of politics in
relief. They, said the projects they
favored coul'd provide employment
quickly.
These critics had staked most of
their hopes of earmarking on the
amendment defeated today. The
amendment had been offered by
Senator Copeland (Dem., N.Y.). Re-
publicans generally joined some
Democrats in voting for the amend-
ment, while most administration sup-
porters opposed it.
After acting on the amendment,
the Senate pushed ahead toward a
final vote on the $3,723,000,000 lend-
ing-spending bill. Senator Barkley
(Dem., Ky.), the Democratic leader,
hoped to win Senate approval to-
night.
Grand Slams Rule
A t Bridge Tourney
To Be Held Here
Three hundred bridge players from
all parts of the country are expected
at the Michigan state contract bridge
championships to be held at the
Union for four days beginning next
Thursday. Oswald Jacoby and How-
ard Schenken, "Four Aces" stars, will
attend the contest, as will players
from New York, Cleveland, and Tor-
onto.
The championship matches in the
tourney will be conducted by the
American Contract Bridge League,
and the Michigan Bridge association.
NYA' Blanks Available
Students wishing NYA jobs for next
semester are asked to apply at the
Student Employment Bureau, Room
2, University Hall, before leaving Ann
Arbor for the summer.

Cooperative
Student Book
Store Planned
Union, League To Operate
Exchange; Regents To
Get Plan Next Smester
Project Limited To
Second-Hand Books
Plans for a student cooperative
book exchange, to be operated jointly
by the Union and League next semes-
ter, were announced las't night by
Douglas Tracy, '40E, chairman of the
committee formed last fall by the
Union to investigate such a book ex-
change. The plans will be submitted
to the Regents for their approval in
the fall.
The book exchange will be located
in the north lounge at the Union, and
will deal only in used books, Tracy
said. Ten per cent of the selling price
will be deducted, he pointed out, to be
used for scholarships. Students work-
ing in the bookstore will be paid from
this fund.
Will Open Next Year
"The book exchange will be a place
where the student can leave his book
to have it sold," said Tracy, who has
volunteered to manage the store with-
out pay. "The book remains his until
it is actually sold. If it is not sold,
the student can take it out of the
store without paying anything," he
explained.
It is planned to open the exchange
during final examination week next
semester to take in books, and to op-
erate through the first week of classes
in the second semester. Tracy point-
ed out that if the venture proves
successful at that time, it may be re-
opened in the late spring.
Studied Other Plans
The committee studied the organi-
zation of bookstores at Big Ten and
other nearby schools before adopting
the present plan, which is a combina-
tion of the best features of those in
use at Minnesota and Purdue. They
found that Michigan was one of the
few Middle Western schools that did
not have some kind of student-oper-
ated exchange.
"Minnesota made $1,200 profit last
year, collecting 10,per cent of the sell-
ing price, just as we plan to do,"
(Continued on Page 2)
Rebels Battle
To Hold Gains
Loyalist 'Troops Blockade
Teruel Offensive
HENDAYE, France, at the Ssanish
Frontier, June 3.-(P)-Spanish In-
surgents fought desperately today to
hold positions won at a heavy cost of
lives and munitions as the power of
the Government's defenses blocked
their Teruel-Mediterranean offen-
sive.
Galician troops under the com-
mand of Gen. Jose Varela tried to
batter their way into Western Castel-
lon province but made little progress.
After days of pounding southeast
along the Teruel - Mediterranean
Highway and Valbona River, Varela
and Gen. Miguel Aranda shifted their
attacks, but the minute their forces
were halted, the Government militia-
men counterattacked.I
Insurgents reported their troops
broke the defense line west of Alboca-

cer but Government sources said Gen.
Jose Miaja's soldiers still held Mount
Castelar and the village of Sarratella,
defending Albocacer on the south.
Slovaks Demnand
Czech Autonomy
PRAHA, Czechoslovakia, June 3.----
(M)-The Slovak Catholic People's
Party tonight presented fresh wor-
ries to the Czechoslovak government
by adding its autonomy demands to
those of Konrad Henlein's Sudeten
Germans.t
The Slovaks, at a party meeting in
Pressburg, said their program called
for a Slovak legislative body in addi-
tion to the general Czechoslovak
parliament at Praha, the transfer of'
a part of the state executive power
to a Slovak government and the cre-
ation of a Supreme Court of Justice
in Czechoslovakia,

Hull Appeals To Nation

ie ,

To

Back U. S. In Move

To Cement World Peace

Haber Speaks
At Delinquency
Meet In Union
Dr. Lowell Carr Elected
Secretary Of Council,
Herbert Orr President
Economic factors are in a large
measure responsible for and may be
correlated with juvenile delinquency,
Dr. .William IHaber of the economics
department told a gathering of near-
ly 200 social workers, teachers, jour-
nalists and clergymen from all parts
of the state at the luncheon of the
second annual Delinquency Preven-
tion Conference, held yesterday at
the Union.
Dr. Lowell J. Carr of the sociology
department was elected secretary of
the Michigan Delinquency Prevention
Council of 100, who sponsored the
conference, at the business meeting of
the Council held last night. Former
State Senator Herbert P. Orr of Caro
was elected president, to -succeed E.
S. Guckert, who was appointed to the
executive committee of the council
with Lee A White, public relations
director of the Detroit News, and
Robert Cook, Saginaw attorney. Mrs.
O. R. Keyworth, president of the
Michigan State Federation of Wom-
en's Clubs, was elected vice-president
of the Council, and Carl Zeisler, ed-
itor of the Monroe News, treasurer.
New Constitution Drawn
A new constitution, providing that
the Council do more to stimulate in-
terest and activity. in the field of
juvenile delinquency, was adopted in
the business meeting.
Plans were approved in the .dinner
meeting for a regional conference
to be held in the Upper Peninsula
in September.
The conference met in the main
ballroom at 10 a.m. yesterday to hear
a welcome by President Ruthven and
Speaker who included Lee A White,
and Charles Chute of New York, ex-
ecutive director of the National Pro-
bation Association. Representatives
of Branch, Oakland, Muskegon and
Monroe counties presented reports
on organization for delinquency pre-
vention in their own communities.
Divided Into Groups
The conference divided into four
discussion groups in the afternoon to
hear such speakers as Drs. Willard C.
Olson and E. W. Blakeman of the
University; Eleanore Hutzel, chief of
the Women's Division and Inspectors
William Johnson and Walter Ger-
main of the Juvenile Division of the
Detroit Police Department; Chief M.
J. Max of the Michigan Central
Railroad Police; Rev. Fr. Frederic
Siedenburg, Executive Dean of the
University of Detroit; Floyd Starr,
president of the Starr Commonwealth
for Boys at Albion; and Hon. D. J.
Healy, Jr., Judge of Probate, of De-
troit.
The conference reconvened in the
main ballroom at 4 p.m. to hear Fred
Johnson,'State Superintendent of the
Michigan Children's Aid Society, who
summarized the work of the after-
(Continued qn Page 6

Students Are
To Donate,

Reminded
Textbooks

The Daily wishes to remind stu-
dents of their opportunity to do-
nate textbooks to the student text
book lending library during the
remainder of the examination pe-
riod. The books may be left at
any branch unit .of the University
library service.
The text book library is for the
use of students unable to afford
to purchase books at the prevail-
ing, prices.. Care will be taken by
the faculty committee in charge of.
the plan that only deserving stu-
dents are permitted the facilities
of the library.
The plan is a sincere effort to
mitigate one of the chief difficul..
ties in the way of democratic edu-
cation at the University, and de-,
serves the support of the entire
student body.
Lewis Refuses
President Aid
In Labor Study
CIO Leader Fears Inquiry
Into British Union Law
May Hurt Wagner Act
WASHINGTON, June 3.--AP)-No
sooner had President Roosevelt an-
nounced a study of the British Trade
Union Act today than John L. Lewis
refused to have anything to do with
the inquiry.
Anxiety lest the study be used to
bring about changes in the Wagner
Labor Relations Act led to the re-
fusal, the CIO leader indicated.
He stuck to his "boycott" of the
investigation despite a specific denial
by President Roosevelt that it would
have anything to do with pobssible
changes in the Wagner act.
Clarification Is Purpose
Mr. Roosevelt told reporters that'
the study, to be made by a special
commission he will send to England
this summer, is designed to clear up
misinformation in this country about,
the British law.
Lewis issued at the same time a
statement addressed to Secretary of
Labor Perkins. In it the CIO leader
said he had accepted previously an
invitation to be represented on the
President's commission. But after
reading published reports that the
study might be the basis for modifi-
cation of the Wagner Act, Lewis con-
tinued, he had changed his mind.
President's Own Idea
"The Committee for Industrial Or-
ganization," he declared, "cannot
sanction such an enterprise, nor per-
mit its representative to serve on
such a commission. It will oppose
amendment of modification of the
Wagner Act."
The President said it was his own
idea to send the commission to Eng-
land to 'get a clear and simple re-
port on the British statute.

Calls Isolation An Illusion
Ins Face Of International
AnarchyRife In Europe
State Department
DecriesBombins
NASHVILLE, Tenn., June 3.-(P)
-Secretary of State Cordell Hull
laid down a four-point program of
United States .cooperation toward a
"world order based on law," and ap-
pealed for a "strong united public
opinion" to back it.,
Before the Bar Association of Ten-
nessee, meeting in his native state,
Mr. Hull declared that, with "a spirit
of international atiarchy" abroad,
"there was never a time in our na-
tional history when the influence of
the United States in support of In-
ternational law was nore urgently
needed."
After rebuking isolationists, whose
"dream of safety and security" he
called "a bitter illusion," he stated
this program:
1. "With the world still in the throes
of a profound economic dislocation,
we are prepared to join with other
nations in directing every effort to-
ward the restoration and strengthen-
ing of sound and constructive inter-
national economic relationships."
2. "With the world groaning
under the burden of mountinig arma-
ments, we are prepared to join with
other nations in moving resolutely
toward bringing about an effective
agreement on limitation and progres-
sive reduction of armaments."
3. "With the use of armed force
assuming the aspect of scarcely imag-
inable brutality, we are prepared to
join with other nations in resuming
and vigorously carrying forward the
work, so auspici sly begun at .he
Hague two generations ago, of hu-
maniing by common agreement the
rules and practices of warfare."
4. "We are prepared to join with
other nations in exploring-all other
methods of revitalizing tha spirit' of
international cooperation.
Welles Scores Bombings
WASHINGTON, June 3.-P)--
Sumner Welles of the Department of
State called bombings in China and
Spain "barbarous" today.
The acting secretary's statement,
one of the strongest the bnited States
Government has ever made on a for-
eign subject, was issued after a con-
ference with President Roosevelt.
It referred to a series, of aerial at-
tacks which ,have killed or injured
thousands of civilians, many of them
women and children.
"Any general bombing of an exten-
sive area wherein there resides a large
population engaged in peaceful pur-
suits is 'contrary to every principle of
law and humanity," the statement
said.
"This government, while scrupu-
, (Continued on Page 2)
owOp Housing
Would Feature
T op Pr c e'-Li'mt
A proposed program of cooperative
housing for Ann Arbor was present-
ed to a meeting of the Ann Arbor
Cooperative Society by Prof. Rich-
ard U. Ratcliff, 'professor of real
estate management in Lane Hall last
night,
The proposed cooperative plan in-
volved a program that would make
possible a planned community in
which a high standard of home con-
struction and property ownership
could be maintained at a definitely
lowered cost. A unique feature of
phe program is the limitation of the
upper price of homes with a view to

the elimination of competitive con-
struction and the promotion of a
more homogeneous community.
Two methods of construction plan-
ning were suggested by Professor
Ratcliff, one of which was the in-
dividual purchase of property and
home construction based on FHA
loans which could be obtained up to
ninety per cent of the property's
value. A seond and more #e'.nnm-

Final Examination Schedules
June 4 to June 14, 1938
College of Engineering
NOTE: For courses having both lectures and quizzes, the Time
of Exercise is the time of the first lecture period of the week; for
courses having quizzes only, the Time of Exercise is the time of the
first quiz period.
Drawing and laboratory work may be continued through the exam-
ination period in amount equal to that normally devoted to such work
during one week.
Certain courses will be examined at special periods as noted below
the regular schedule. All cases of conflicts between assigned exam-
ination periods must be reported for adjustment to Professor J. C.
Brier, Room 3223 East Engineering Building, before June 1. To avoid
misunderstandings and errors, each student should receive notification
from his instructor of the time and place of his appearance in each
course during the period June 4 to June 14.
No single course is permitted more than four hours of examination.

Final Exarmnation Schedules
June 4 to June 14, 1938
College of Literature, Science and the Arts, Graduate School,

No date of examination may
Classification Committee.
Time of Exercise

be changed without the consent of the

Monday
Monday
Monday
Monday
Monday
Monday
Monday
Tuesday
Tuesday
Tuesday
Tuesday
Tuesday
Tuesday
Tuesday

at
at
at
at
at
at
at
at
at
at
at
at
at
at

8
9
10
11
1
2
3
8
9
10
11
1
2
3

Time
Wednesday,
Monday,
Tuesday,
Monday,
Monday,
Saturday,
Thursday,
Monday,
Tuesday,
Thursday,
Friday,
Tuesday,
Friday,
Saturday,

of Examination
June 8 8-12
June 6 2- 6
June 7 8-12
June 6 8-12
June 13 8-12
June 4 8-12
June 9 8-12

Exam.
Group
Letter
A
B
C
D
E
F
G
H
I
J
K
L
M
N
0
P

School of
Monday
Monday
Monday
Monday
Monday
Monday
Monday
Tuesday
Tuesday
Tuesday
Tuesday
Tuesday
Tuesday
Tuesday
Special
Special
Special

at
at
at
at
at
at
at
at
at
at
at
at
at
at

8
9
10
11
1
2
3
8
9
10
11
1
2
3

Education, School of Forestry
Time Time of Examination
of - '
Exercise Second Semester

Wednesday,
Monday,
Tuesday,
Monday,
Monday,
Saturday,
Thus sday,
Monday,
Tuesday,
Thursday,
Friday,
Tuesday,
Friday,
Saturday,
Wednesday,
Saturday,
Tuesday,

June
June
June
June
June
June
June
June
June
June
June
June
June
June
June
June
June
711"

8
6
7
6
13
'4
9
13
7
9
10
14
10
11
8
11
14
A

9-12
2- 5
9-12
9-12
9-12
9-12
9-12
2- 5
2- 5
2- 5
2- 5
9-12
9-12
2- 5
2- 5
9-12
2- 5
%)

June
:June
June
June
June
June
June

13
7
9
10
14
10
11

2- 6
2- 6
2- 6
2- 6
8-12
8-12
2- 6

L

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