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May 27, 1938 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1938-05-27

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FRIDAY, MAY 27, 1938
Smick's Homer
With3 On Tops
Wisconsin, 5-1
Breaks Up 10-Inning Tie
As Fishman Scatters Five
Hits; Both Score In 2nd
(Continued from Page 1)
rific four-base blow to deep right
center scoring his three teammates
ahead of him. Wisconsin failed to
score in their half.
Lisagor counted three singles in
five trips to the plate to aid the
Wolverine cause greatly. Norm 01-
son, Wisconsin keystone guardian,
paced the losers with a double and
single in five times at bat. Russ Dis-
meier had a pair of singles in four
tries. -
Danny Does It

THE MICUIGAN DAILY

Connects For Three

Pete Lisagor, second baseman for
Ray Fisher's nine, who yesterday
knocked out three singles in five
times at bat. His second inning hit
batted ,in the run that enabled the
'Wolverines to send the game into
extra innings and eventually win
on Danny Smick's homer.

Michigan 5 AB
Pink, cf...... . .....4
Brewer, ss ........... 5
Peckinpaugh, 3b.....4
Kremer, if . . . .......2
Smick, rf..........5
Trosko, rf...........0
Gedeon, lb .......... 5
Lisagor, 2b........5
Beebe, c ...........5
Fishman, p . .........3
Totals.. ....38
Wisconsin 1 AB
Olson, 2b ............5
Gerlach, ss..........3
Bietila, c .. . '.........4
Dismeier, lb.........4
A. Smith, 3b .........3
Radder, If..........4:
Demark, rf..........3
Schilling, cf .... .,....3
Henrichs, p ..........2
*Radke... ......1
**Stephen ........1

R
1
1
0
2
1
0
0
0
0
0
5

H
1
1
1
0
3
0
3
0
9

0
3
1
0
4
0
0
12
5
4
1
30

A
0
4
2
0
0
0
1
2
1
6
16
A
1
0
1'
1
4
0
0
0:
21
0'
-9
-91

,

R H
0 2
0 0
0 0
1 2
0 0
00
0 0
0 1
0 0
0 0
0 0

U
2
0
9
9
0.
3
6
1
0
0
0
30

Totals .... .....33 1 5,
*Batted for Schilling in 10th.
**Batted for Henrichs in 10th.
Michigan.. . .010 000 000 4
Wisconsin ... 010 000 000 0l
Errors: Lisagor, A. Smith.
batted in: Lisagor, Smick 4.

9 1
1 5 1
Runs
Two-

base hits:' Olson. Three base hit,
Smick. Home run, Smick. Left on
base, Michigan 9, Wisdonsin 6. Stolen
bases, Brewer, Kremer. Sacrifice hits,
Smith, Henrichs, Brewer. Struck-out
by, Henrichs 9, Fishman 3. Bases on,
balls off Fishman 2, Henrichs 5. Um-
pires, Below and Verberkmoes. Balk,
Fishman. Time 2:24.
Chuck Koesis
Is Eliminated
Former Wolverine Golfi &
Bows Out Of Amateur
LONDON, May 26.-Chuck Kocsis,
former Michigan golf captain,
reached the heights this morning in
the British Amateur over a wind- and
rain-swept Scottish course to elimin-
ate U.S. Amateur Champion Johnnyi
Goodman 3 and 2. Then Chuck went
out in the afternoon and sank to the
depths of his game as he was
swamped by Johnny Stevenson, the
local pride,. 7 and 5.
Probably never in recent history
has a player looked so much like a
champion in the morning only to lose
touch with all his clubs so completely
in the afternoon.
After dropping the first hole to
Goodman when his drive skidded in-
to the heather, Chuck was the comn-
plete master of the 1937 U.hS. cham-
pion. He was laying his irons into
the wind like a Tommy Armour at
his best, and his woody were long
and fully under control.
In the afternoon it was another
atd sadder.story. Chuck committed
every error in the 'book, and each.
missed shot gave Stevensor more
confidence. By the tenth, where the
little Scot canned a 45-footer with,
his sister's putter to be 4 up, Stev-
enson had polished Kocsis off.
Joining, Goodman and Kocsis on
the sidelines was Fred Haas, Jr., who
bowed out at 2 up to Sam McKinlay,1
Glasgow golf writer. This left blythe
and forth-right Charley Yates of At-!
lanta as America's lone hope for the
championship.
ROSS-ARMSTRONG GO TONIGHT
NEW YORK, May 26.-}P)-The 15-
round welterweight title fight be-
tween Champion Barney Ross and
Hepry Armstrong today was post-
poned until tomorrow night because
of rain.

Faculty Teams
Emulate Yanks
A ndDodgers
By TOM PHARES
Alternately resen'ibling the New,
York Yankees at their best and the
Brooklyn Dodgers at their worst,
Prof. Karl Litzenberg's English De-
partment nine battled through eight
hectic innings yesterday at Ferry
Field to wallop Prof. Anthony Jobin's
Romance Language aggregation 7 to
3.
Like the Yanks-Charles "Power-
house" Peake, slugging. English third
sacker, pounded out three homers to
I drive in five runs. Like the Dodgers
--well things began to look promising
when the fourth inning started.
Litzenberg Applies Brakes
After things quieted down Litzen-
berg stepped up and hit a clean single
to left. The ball slithered through
the legs of left-fielder Grey and this
seemed to spur the flying English
mentor to greater things. He round-
ed second like a wild steer and al-
though the ball was coming in when
he hit third he paid no heed and
headed for the plate. "Gabby" Mer-
cado got the ball about this time
and dashed toward third. Litzenberg
applied the brakes and"proceeded to
fall flat whereupon the Romance
catcher gleefully made the putout.
Peake then slugged out his second
consecutive homer, the side was re-
tired and a mysterious "Mr. Smith"
who looked rather collegiate for a
faculty man came togbat for the Ro-
n'ance Language outfit.
No Alphonse-Gaston here
Smith lifted a towering fly out to-
ward right field where the heavy-set
Mr. Norman Nelson was doing his pa-
trolling in an undershirt. "DiMag"
Nelson started in for the ball but at
the same time Andy Green, English
roving fielder, began to back-pedal
after the twisting fly.
Just as the two were about to crash,
Mr. Nelson fell down, rolled under
Mr. Green who was still after the elu-
ive ball, and Mr. Green sat down-~
heavily-on Mr. "Nelson. He snagged
the ball with aone-handed stab how-
ever and everything was rosy. Mr.
Nelson had no statement for publica-
tion.
Yankees, Red Sox Win
As Rowe Is Beaten 54
The New York Yankees snapped
out of their three game losing streak
at the expense of Detroit and the
Boston Red Sox defeated Cleveland
to climb back within two games of
the league-leading Indians yesterday
in the two feature games of four
played in the American league. All
National League games were rained
out.
Red .Ruffing pitched seven-hit ball
in defeating Mickey Cochrane's crew
and Schoolboy Rowe 5-1. Jack Wil-
son's five hit pitching and Jimmy
Foxx's tenth home run of the year
were contributing factors to the 8-4
victory of the Red Sox over the In-
dians.__ _ __

PRESS PASSES
By BUD BENJAMIN
Marmaduke And Joe .. .
HERE'S A PRETTY PICTURE you might think about in your spare time.
It's an account of how our football players, "our little tin Gods" as one
enthusiastic alumnus put it, spend their football seasons.
First, the Hollywood version. Marmaduke, the All-American halfback
strolls down to football practice at 3:30 p.m. after a busy afternoon of coke
drinking and card playing at his favorite campus hangout. He dresses with
gusto, eager to get some needed exercise. Dashing out on the practice field,
he is greeted by a thunderous applause from the crowd of gorgeous co-eds
who never miss a daily practice. For two hours, he runs up and down
the field scoring touchdown after touchdown. Finally the coach calls a halt
to proceedings and Marmaduke, winded by his tough day, heads for the
locker room and thence to his luxurious fraternity house. There he
will recline in a big, comfortable armchair while aping brethren adoringly
listen to his description of the day's work. He eats a big dinner, lies down
for an hour or so of rest, perhaps studies until 11 (superfluous effort for a
star of his repute), and then to bed-completely exhausted.
Sounds swell, doesn't it? Not only that, but he becomes a campus
idol, wears a big letter on his sweater, and makes keen week-end trips
all over the country. Whatta life!
Now let's see how the other half lives-the side Hollwood has
forgotten. Joe, a big tackle from a small town, hasn't much money
and has to work for his board. He also has a factory job three days a
week to help him along, and he has to hustle plenty to make practice
on time. He doesn't score touchdowns in practice but spends his two
hours rehearsing blocking technique, important but not too interest-
ing work. No blondes on the sidelines to serve as incentives, for the
practices are all closed. When Joe finishes drilling, he hauls his tired
and often bruised body straight to his fraterniy house too. But
he enters the side door and goes down to the kitchen. There he will
wash dishes, peel potatoes, or wait on table, and when he finishes his
work he'll down a quick meal and drag himself home. He'll study as
long as he can keep awake, turn in, and another thrill-packed day is
over.
The Conference Acts .. .
THAT'S THE STORY of Marmaduke and Joe, two members of the football
colony. The Joes are as numerous as beards in the Red Square; the
Marmadukes are scarcer than hens' teeth. Last week-end the Western
Conference, after years of debate and investigation, decided to give Joe a
break. They made their first definite move to establish a football training
table in the Big Ten.
The plan would provide for a meal after each practice for the players.
At present, the two weeks of pre-season training and competitive week-ends
are the only times that they are fed by the University. As in the case of all
Conference legislation, the plan is now being presented to the athletic
boards of all 10 schools. Unless there is a protest within 60 college days,
it will automatically go into effect. One protest will postpone action until
the December meeting, and at that time a simple majority vote can overrule
this objection. Obviously, there is little possibility of a training table this
fall, for 60 college days would carry action over into November. Yet it's a
step forward.
Coaches throughout the Conference favor the meaure strongly.
Coach Fritz Crisler's only quote on the proposal was: "I'm for it." And
there was no doubt that he meant it.
The advantages of the proposal are mainly in its physical and
psychological effects on the team. It would end mad rushes to board
jobs after practice and would insure the players of a proper diet-
'essential to their success. It would knit the team into a much closer
and harmonious body. Anyone who has ever made a trip with one of
the teams is struck by the spirit of comraderie which prevails. Put
35 or so hungry football men in front of a big meal with no threat of
dish washing hanging over their heads and watch them open up. It
would nurture a team spirit unattainable under present conditions.
Objections-And Answers...
THAT THE PLAN has difficulties is undeniable. Here are the principal
objections:
1. What about the other teams? Wouldn't they also demand
training table facilities?
2. Wouldn't this plan arouse further unfavorable comment in
regard to the commercialization of football?
3. How would football players keep their board jobs when they
would be unable to work evenings during the season?
All of these objections do have substantial backing. They can be partially
answered, however. As to the first argument, other teams should realize
that this move would mark a period of transition. It cannot be attained
in one big jump. Certainly football, source of practically all of our athletic
revenue, deserves the first break. As to point number two-the unsavory
commercialization charges which might arise from the plan. It seems to
us that with everyone from the United States Supreme Court to pool rooni
Gus recognizing football as a business, any other concept is rather naive.
The third objection is the strongest. This is not an argument against the
plan, but rather against a possible repercussion. It might possibly be
overcome by a comprehensive stagger system among the athletes.
We're putting in our vote for the training table whole-heartedly.
That it would result in some difficulty we do not deny, but the plan
has so many advantages that these obstacles must be surmounted.
Tackle Joe and associates have earned that much of a break.

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ARBOR SPRINGS WATER COMPANY
Phone 8270

LAST WEEK FOR SPECIAL
Italian Spaghetti 25c
DINNERS . . . 40c to $1.25
1602 Packard Rd. at Marion St,
Ypsilanti

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__ , . T _ . _ _...

It's BUTTER PECAN Week

.III

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Now IS THE TIME lo fake advantage of
the superb golfing facilities which are daily
offlerecd you at . . .
w ist w --..s-E . i r -L a w ,rte

May 26--June 1
ICE CREAM
RI ITTFD rDCAKi mel \/AKII I A iR1iC1i<

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