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May 22, 1938 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1938-05-22

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

nr THE MICHIGAN DAILY SUN

DAY, 1I

Ct
tf

Ben Franklin' Hoover Attacks
New Deal InPhiladelphia Talk
PHILADELPHIA, May 21.-()- Hoover said "I also supported
sing the words and philosophy of Franklin in the theory that you got
enjamin Franklin, former President what we now call social security by
saving pennies and producing more.
erbert Hoover tonight took a dozen That was before we discovered the
tck-handed slaps at the New Deal. theory of restricted production and
Speaking at a dinner climaxing a spending ourselves into prosperity."
ree-day program dedicating a new Franklin issued wise advice on the
anklin memorial, the former presi- cure of ecortiomic depressions, the for-
mt declared that "if we waked mer President said. "He asked 'what
anklin up and walked him around signify wishing and hoping for bet-
re for a few days we might not ter times?' He asserted that 'we may
riet him down for the next 142 make these times better if we better
gars." ' ourselves' and produce. He knew none
On the other hand1, he added, "from of the joys of planned economy."
e stimulus to his magnificent sense j
humor, he might just laugh.".
In a manner unlike that in his pre- End Cleveland
ous speeches Hoover struck out atC
vernment spending, relief, the farm
ogram, public works, devaluation Relief Sit-D own
d business regulation in good-hu-
ored fashion.
Ask New Appropriation;
fates Will Attend $80,000_Almost Gone
Washington Parley CLEVELAND, May 21.- (P-The
sit-down protest of relief clients and
sympathizers in Cleveland's council
Dean Henry M.ate of t a chamber ended late today when some
hool will leave tomorrow morning; 350 men and women marched out of
attend a conference of leaders in city hall, singing "Solidarity Forever."
isiness, agriculture, labor, and sci-
ic to be held Wednesday in Wash-, Sitting in the leather-covered
Lton. chairs of the chamber in relays, the
Thirty-six leaders from the four crowd had held the austere room
Thirtsi leaeshon tyhSenfor since Monday night. With relief
Ids have been chosen. by Senator funds depleted, greater Cleveland has
sbert J. Bulkley (Dem., Ohio) to been caring for 87,000 needy with
cuiss a proposal for a national stopgap appropriations since May 1.
unrcil which can serve to promote An $80,000 appropriation voted last
operation between government -ande Monday will be exhausted over the
e various interests of the people. weekend, city officials predicted to-
day, and some new action will be
necessary when the council meets
Monday.
D R IVDEWAY David;Lasser; president of the
Workers, Alliance which has support-
ed the demonstration, has called a
state conference of the unemployed
VI Columbus for next Saturday.

Scouts Comb Debris For Bomb Victims

Lecturer Denounces Legislation
As Practical Means To Peace.

Peace cannot be obtained by legis-
lation, Mrs. Louise L. Wright, lec-
2urer and author, told a meeting of
she Canadian-American Affiliates of
the Foreign Policy Association yes-
terday in the League.
Mrs. Wright, national chairman of
Government and Foreign Policy De-
partment of the National League of
Women Voters and former Minne-
Wota faculty member, based her state-
nent on three facts. Legislation im-
plies rigidity, especially in the case
of the neutrality act, she said, where-
- - - --

Ias peace, an integral part of foreign
affairs, calls for fluidity of treatment.
Secondly,,the meaning of peace is
misunderstood by the public, which
believes it is something that can be
bought or sold. Thirdly peace is in-
ternational and legislation is purely
domestic, Mrs. Wright believes.
The best method to obtain peace is
through international trade agree-
ments and through ratifications of
treaties plus the passage of domestic
legislation to implement these, she
declared.

SPECIAL
GOSSARD'S

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Mis SimplicityIONS

Progressives To Picnic
A program of athletics and singing
is planned for the Progressive Club
picnic to be held today at Dexter
State, Park on the Huron River Drive.
The group will meet at Lane Hall
ha

B
to
bu
ens

Boy Scouts and rescue workers are shown searching debris on Tak
Hing Street in Canton, China, for victims, after Japanese bombers
dropped their havoc-spreading eggs on the metropolisMay 12.

Get the world's good news daily through
THE CHRISTIAN SCIENCE MONITOR
An International Daily Newspaper
Published by THE CHRISTIAN SCIENCE PUBLISHING SOCIETY
One, Norway Street, Boston, Massachusetts
Regular reading of THE CHRISTIAN; SCIENCE MONITOR is considered
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FIRST CHURCH of CHRIST SCIENTIST
Free Public Reading Room Hours: 11:30 - 5:00

REAL

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DAILY OFFICIAL BUIIETIN
Publication i the Buletir is orstructlve notice to al mami rs of the

L/ulveyrsity. opy received at the office of the Assistant to the President
unti 3:30. 11:00 a.m. onSaturday

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Speech Teachers
Discuss New

Meet;
Methods

KILLINS GRAVEL
COMPA NY
Telephone 7112

Meeting yesterday afternoon in
Room 318 of the Union, speech teach-
ers from colleges all over Michigan
discussed methods of teaching begin-
ning courses in their subject.
Chairman of the discussion, which
was carried on informally, was Pro-
fessor G. E. Densmore of the speech
department. Unification of methods
was discussed.

THE PARROT
338 SOUTH STATE STREET

I

OUR SPECIAL DINNERS
Chicken Gumbo Soup
Chilled Tomato Juice'
Chilled Fruit Cocktail

/

90c
Sizzling Porterhouse, with sauce
Sizzling Filet Mignon, with sauce
80c
Sizzling One-Pound T-Bone
Sizzling Regular Filet Mignon
65o .
Sizzling Branded Top Sirloin
Roast Turkey, Dressing, Jelly
Roast Duckling, Dressing, Sauce
Fried One-Halt Spring Chicken!
OUR FEATURE DINNERS
60c *
Assorted Chop Grill with Jelly
Broiled Regular T-Bone, sauce,
Grilled Wilson's Ham Steak, jelly
55c 1
Broiled Special T-Bone, sauce
Broiled Lake Trout, drawn butter

Roast Ribs of Beef, brown gravy
Fried Scallops with Tarter Sauce
Broiled Small T-Bone steak
Grilled Lamb Chops with jelly
Grilled Pork Chop, apple sauce
OUR REGULAR DINNERS
---____--_45c
Fillet of Haddock, tarter sauce
Braised Swiss Steak, ala Parrot
Tenderloin of Veal, mushrooms
Chopped Round Steak, sauce.
Grilled Beef -Liver with bacon
Fresh Mushroom Omellette
Fresh Vegetable Dinner
Cold Meat Loaf Plate
Cold Delicatessan Plate
With the Dinners, Choice of Three
Mashed Potatoes Corn Niblets
Potato' Salad Carrots and Peas
Candied Yams Green Beans
[ead Lettuce, Cottage Cheese,
Apple Sauce. For Dessert-Fruit
Jello, Pie, Ice Cream or Cake

(Continued from Page 4)
Library Science department, will dis-
cuss Husserl's idea of Philosophy as
an Exact Science on Monday evening,
May 23, at 7:45 in Room 202, S.W.
Those interested in philosophical dis-
cussion are invited to attend.
Churches
Anfn Arbor Friends (Quakers) will
hold their meeting for worship Sun-
day at 5 p.m. at the Michigan League,
followed by a business meeting at 6
o'clock, for which members are urged
to be present. All who are interested
are welcome.
First Church of Christ, Scientist,
409 So. Division St.
Sunday morning service at 10:30.
Subject: "Soul and Body."
Golden Text: Psalms 42:11.
Sunday School at 11:45 after the
morning service,
Disciples Guild (Church of Christ)
10:45 a.m., Morning Worship, Rev.
Fred Cowin, Minister.
5 p.m. Members of the Guild and
their friends will meet at the Guild
House, 438 Maynard Street, and hike
to the park by the Huron River for
games, picnic supper and a vesper,
service. If it rains the meeting willf
be held at the Guild House at 5:30
p.m.
First Congregational Church, cor-
ner of State and William.
10:45 a.m., "The Fascination of the
Commonplace"twill be the subject of
Dr. Leonard A. Parr's sermon at the
morning service of worship. The or-
gan prelude will be "Allegro Can-
tabile" from Widor's V Symphony;
the choir will sing "O Be Joyful in the'
Lord" by Gretchaninoff; and Miss
Lois Greig, soprano, will sing, "It Was
For Me" by Blount.
4:30 p.m. The Student Fellowship
will leave Pilgrim Hall at 4:30 for a
picnic at the Island. In case of rain,;
the meeting will be held in the church
parlors at 5:30.
F rst Presbyterian Church, Washte-
naw Ave.
"The Certainty of God" will be the
subject of Dr. W. P. Lemon's sermon
at the Morning Worship Service at
10:45. The student choir directed by
{Miss Claire Coci and the children's
choir under the leadership of Mrs.
Fred Morns will take part in the serv-
ice. The musical numbers will in-
clude: Organ Prelude, "Preludio" by
Corelli; Anthem, "Come, Holy Ghost"
by Palestrina; Solo, "Eye Hath Not
Seen" from "The Holy City" by Gaul,
Elizabeth Adams; Organ Postlude,
"Fugue in D. Major" by Bach.
Did you ever start a business? Did
your Christian principles work? Come
to the Westminster Guild meeting
Sunday night at 5:30 and help us

tackle the problem of organizing a
cooperative. The advisors: Mrs. How-
ard Y. McClusky and Dr. A. K. Stev-
ens.
First Methodist Church. Dr. C. W.
Brashares will preach on the theme:
"My Redeemer" at 10:40 o'clock.
Stalker Hall. The Student Class
will not meet again until next fall.
Wesleyan Guild meeting at 6 p.m.
Dr. W. E. Harrison will speak on
"From Oxford and Georgia and Re-
turn." D . Harrison is the superin-
tendent of' the Ann Arbor District of
the Methodist Church.
Fellowship Hour and supper at 7
St. Andrew's Episcopal Church:
Services of worship Sunday are: 8:00
a.m. Holy Communion, 9:30 a.m.
Church School,1 11:00 a.m. Kinder-
garten, 11:00 a.m. Morning Prayer
and Sermon by the Rev. Henry Lewis.
Harris Hall: The Rev. Ernest Piper,
rector of St. Matthias' Church, De-
troit, will speak to the student group
in Harris Hall tonight at 7 o'clock.
Mr. Piper attended , the Edinburgh
Conference on Church Unity last
summer ,and will discuss "Present
World Trends Towards Church Re-
union." All Episcopal students and
their friends are cordially invited.
There will be a picnic for Episcopal
students this afternoon. The group
will leave from Harris Hall at 4:30.
Please call 7735 or 8613 for reserva-
tions.
St. Paul's Lutheran Church, corner
of Liberty and Third, C. A. Brauer,
pastor. Church School at 9:30. Morn-
ing worship at 10:30 instead of 10:45
This will be a Pre-Confirmation serv-
ice in which a class of confirmands
will be catechized on the fundamen-
tals of the Christian religion.
St. Paul's Student Club, meeting at
Liberty and Third, will sponsor its
annual Senior-Alumni and Walther
League Banquet in the social rooms
of the church at 6:30 this Sunday
evening. The Graduating students
of the University are to be the hon-
ored guests. Prof. Albert Hyma of
the University will be the principal
speaker. He has chosen for his topic:
"The Church sand the World." All
Lutheran students and their friends
are cordially invited.
Unitarian Church: 11 a.m. Sunday
morning forum: Last of series on
World Clinic. Topic, "Has Capital-
ism Outlived Its Usefulness?"
Discussion by Prof. John F. Shepard
and Prof. Albert Hyma with ques-
tion period to follow.
7:30 p.m. Liberal Students' Union:
Discussion of "Political Prejudice"
led by William Rohn and other stu-
dents.

A Dif i ut Cjc eee
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I'M/,AD DEfVEcLOINCSERICE*
10//1
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t h Univrtimely, an doustulAvf. . W n t o
to7 lokoe u opeedslyo aea
\' toay
COMPETE AMER
ADfficuLtPINChoRICE..
A RAfN GITsaiffiulwcocmae.
t2 o rok noversuicoplee dsay 'ortcAe.

MisSimplicity* garments are
only available at this special
price twice 'a year. At all other
times they must be sold at reg-
ular prices. Remember, this is
not old stock, but fresh mer-
chandise made of NEW elastics
and fabrics. The MisSimplicity*
feature (elastic straps that pull
diagonally) cinch in the dia-
phram and waist.
8 .
8 NICKELS ARCADE

I1:

Par. G+
Pos. No.
40~9,zje

Read The Daily Clasified

r

- WAWA

COTTONS for
COOLN ESS
Work and play in comfort !

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Attention Everyone!
Our 15th Annual.
COLLEGE-END SALE

I

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t '.e _,.
1
:ii

Men's and
Women 's
STARTS MONDAY MORNING at 9 o'clock
(one week earlier than usual) The most drastic
reductions of the year on our newest and finest
shoes - including whites. We are badly over-
stocked due to cold weather and slow trade con-
ditions and are compelled to move these shoes out
before thousands leave Ann Arbor at the close of
college.
1000 pairs MEN'S SHOES go out at
$490 -$590-$690u
1500 pairs LADIES' SHOES go out at

I. .

7=77=77,1 1

CONSULT*...

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COTTON DRESSES,

washable, fast colors,
prints, bright and
cool. 'Skirts either
swirl or slim-fitting.
2.00 12.95

US FOR ADVICE and help on all paint ques-
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Our first service: Free Parkinz next to our store

$390 -$490-$590

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